From Packet Exchanges to Application Exchanges

August 8, 2007

I once ran across an article that said Equinix customers can access over 90% of the world’s internet networks and users due to the number of carriers, content providers and peering located in their IBX facilities. That is a very staggering thought if you really think about it. The Internet is an endless array of fiber spread across the globe and most of it touches an Equinix facility somewhere along the path. There is little doubt about the value in being located inside an Equinix facility. The world’s largest carriers have standardized on using their facilities as global POPs to reach anyone and everyone connected to the net

While reading Mark Cuban’s latest blog, he proposes using an IntraNet vs the InterNet for large scale application deployment. He basically outlines the inability to sustain high bandwidth quality of service across the public internet. He believes that if the hosted application were to reside on the same network as the end user, the probability of success would be greatly enhanced. Although not quite the traditional IntraNet as we know it today, I do agree that having the content and user on the same network will probably lead to a much higher quality of service.

Taking that thought process and merging it into the latest Web2.0 initiative creates interesting possibilities. Isabel Wang has very provoking thoughts on social networking, SaaS, grid technology, EC2, S3, web integration and an endless list of possibilities. SWSoft and VMWare are talking SaaS and virtualization integration. Vlad and his team at 3Tera are deploying grids like there’s no tomorrow and Facebook, Salesforce, and Amazon are now building apps on an open API system designed to cater to developers. The whole world is reaching out to interact, merge, integrate, build, piggyback, and coordinate technology to make the geek world user friendly.

So I come back to SoftLayer and think – where do we fit into this big picture. It seems our network-within-the-network approach appears to fulfill Mark Cuban’s desire for both Intranet and Internet. The ability to rapidly deploy dedicated, virtualized, and grid technologies at the click of button serves the fundamental need of the Web2.0 entries. The ability of these companies to interact/integrate publicly and privately among each other is well served through our customer exchange. It sounds like if we were to strategically drop SoftLayer PODs inside the Equinix’s of the world – we could bring the world a much needed service for the future. On network Application exchanges to your local IntraNet. Now, there’s an idea.

-@lavosby

Comments

August 8th, 2007 at 1:53pm

To really capitalize on your network within a network, you have to conquer the last mile of connectivity problem. Unless you live in a major metro area, your possibilities for connectivity are highly limited. For example, here at our offices, we've two choices: Comcast or ATT. Sure there are lots of other players but in a few hops you are back to comcast or ATT. The quality and throughput is very poor.

In NYC, Cogent will drop a 100Mbit fiber right into your office and connect it to their Multi-GigE metro loop. For example, we've a client that uses co-lo facilities at the DRT facility at 111 8th Ave in Manhattan. One reason for using that site is they may start distributing video via pay per view to other outlets. They would need a lot of bandwidth to take the video from their office and onto the distribution network. Using cogent, they can get 100's Mbit connectivity directly from their office to the datacenter. This would eliminate the need for them to send tapes/dvd's to a distribution center.

I've a friend that owns two restaurants about a block from each other. Because his POS (point-of-sale but the other meaning is equally appropriate) equipment is stand-alone, he walks back and forth half-dozen times a night checking on operations and sales.

I asked him, wouldn't it be better if he could be in his office or even at home, see what tables are full, see the revenues, see the stock levels at each restaurant. So when the bar at Foster's runs out of Grey Goose Vodka, he can quickly send a message to go get some from Miso. Transfer the inventory in the online system. The entire operation could be hosted at SL and linked up over VPN. The problem ... ATT and Comcast. Bandwidth and service issues would require you to have multiple providers on-site, which could quickly negate any productivity savings.

 

August 10th, 2007 at 11:34am

People are not packets! I am so frustrated that SoftLayer doesn't seem to get it :(

James Governor says open source software is social media: the communities that form around projects turn every component, every bug fix into a social object. Lance Crosby thinks Internet infrastructure can be social media too. He says SoftLayer's cust...

August 13th, 2007 at 12:50pm

The issue with Softlayers private network is that at least the last time I looked at it it was a single provider. Who wants to build a mission critical system that can only connect to their colo through a single provider? Be it routing flaps or connectivity cuts, that's just silly.

Much better to put a VPN on the front facing side of your servers, then tunnel through to the backend if needed.

Even adding just one other provider would go a long way. I should check, maybe one has been added.

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Comments

August 8th, 2007 at 1:53pm

To really capitalize on your network within a network, you have to conquer the last mile of connectivity problem. Unless you live in a major metro area, your possibilities for connectivity are highly limited. For example, here at our offices, we've two choices: Comcast or ATT. Sure there are lots of other players but in a few hops you are back to comcast or ATT. The quality and throughput is very poor.

In NYC, Cogent will drop a 100Mbit fiber right into your office and connect it to their Multi-GigE metro loop. For example, we've a client that uses co-lo facilities at the DRT facility at 111 8th Ave in Manhattan. One reason for using that site is they may start distributing video via pay per view to other outlets. They would need a lot of bandwidth to take the video from their office and onto the distribution network. Using cogent, they can get 100's Mbit connectivity directly from their office to the datacenter. This would eliminate the need for them to send tapes/dvd's to a distribution center.

I've a friend that owns two restaurants about a block from each other. Because his POS (point-of-sale but the other meaning is equally appropriate) equipment is stand-alone, he walks back and forth half-dozen times a night checking on operations and sales.

I asked him, wouldn't it be better if he could be in his office or even at home, see what tables are full, see the revenues, see the stock levels at each restaurant. So when the bar at Foster's runs out of Grey Goose Vodka, he can quickly send a message to go get some from Miso. Transfer the inventory in the online system. The entire operation could be hosted at SL and linked up over VPN. The problem ... ATT and Comcast. Bandwidth and service issues would require you to have multiple providers on-site, which could quickly negate any productivity savings.

 

August 10th, 2007 at 11:34am

People are not packets! I am so frustrated that SoftLayer doesn't seem to get it :(

James Governor says open source software is social media: the communities that form around projects turn every component, every bug fix into a social object. Lance Crosby thinks Internet infrastructure can be social media too. He says SoftLayer's cust...

August 13th, 2007 at 12:50pm

The issue with Softlayers private network is that at least the last time I looked at it it was a single provider. Who wants to build a mission critical system that can only connect to their colo through a single provider? Be it routing flaps or connectivity cuts, that's just silly.

Much better to put a VPN on the front facing side of your servers, then tunnel through to the backend if needed.

Even adding just one other provider would go a long way. I should check, maybe one has been added.

Leave a Reply

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