More RAM!

June 16, 2008

More RAM. DDR2 must be going out of style, because Microcenter is selling a gig for $12.99. This time I don't make it in time before they run out, and I settle for sour grapes: my home pc can't use all the addressable memory, anyway. 4 Gigabytes. The maximum addressable memory for a 32-bit motherboard / OS. It used to be such a big deal to me- maxing out the 4 slots on my Dell, but not anymore. Why? Because now I work for SoftLayer. When you work with motherboards with up to 32 slots, 1 or 2 gig each; 4 measly slots just seems sad. I start nosing around for a video card that will fit the last expansion slot on my pc. No luck. I end up going home empty handed from Microcenter (outrageous!) and ordering the pci-e x1 video card from Newegg.

So, the hardware that customers can order at SoftLayer is impressive enough to jade the geek tech-lust of any home technician. And everything fits so nice and clean. Working on SoftLayer servers has really spoiled me for home pc's. Open up the case on your home pc and what do you see? Fabulous shiny bits? No. Cables. Cables in the computer. Cables behind the computer. Cables everywhere! You get the nifty zips and loops from Radio Shack, spend 2 hours zipping and looping, and as you proudly call your wife over to take a look she says, "Can't it all be wireless?"

The truth is neat cables take time, and SoftLayer engineers spend every spare minute making neat, organized, color-coordinated cables running to the servers. Cat 5e. Fiber. Special cables. Cables we can't talk about. All very neat and aesthetic. If Mr. Crosby ever takes you for a walk through the dc (datacenter), it looks effortless and lovely. But it took hours. Hundreds of hours. Just on cabling (I think SoftLayer might have stock in zip ties). You can be sure your SoftLayer server is not lost in a sea of Cat5 and power cables. It has been gracefully bound to its slot, the formidable innards pumping away at your command, your data streaming straight and true from switch to switch into the Internet beyond...

-Philip

Comments

June 19th, 2008 at 12:06pm

Show us some photos, lol!

It would be nice to see the actual servers and racks softlayer rents to customers.
You're not the only one who likes to see lean mean machines you know...

June 19th, 2008 at 1:04pm

ha ha, lance should give you 50 bucks if you tell in this posting that he is the best ever ceo that sl had :)

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Comments

June 19th, 2008 at 12:06pm

Show us some photos, lol!

It would be nice to see the actual servers and racks softlayer rents to customers.
You're not the only one who likes to see lean mean machines you know...

June 19th, 2008 at 1:04pm

ha ha, lance should give you 50 bucks if you tell in this posting that he is the best ever ceo that sl had :)

Leave a Reply

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