Is That a Real Computer?

October 2, 2009

Some mornings after work when the weather is nice I'll go to a local coffee shop on the way home to read or study for the CCNA exams. Sometimes I'll just end up pulling out the netbook and browse around online. There are times during these outings when I'll get asked the title question of this blog: is that a real computer? I guess the size that throws people but the answer is yes.

For those who are not familiar with the netbook class of systems here are the specs for mine:

  • 10.2 inch screen
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 1.6GHz Intel Atom processor
  • 160GB SATA hard drive
  • 3 USB ports
  • Card reader
  • Built-in Wifi
  • Built-in webcam
  • Windows XP (I've got plans for Windows 7)
  • 5 hour battery life
  • Light weight (I've got books that weigh more)

Netbooks are great for when you're just knocking around town and might want to do some light web work. This morning while at Starbucks I've checked e-mail several times, caught up on the daily news, and reviewed the game statistics from the Cowboys game I missed last night. Other mornings I've fired up a VPN connection into the office and been able to remotely help with tickets, work on documentation for our SSL product and tinker around with a NetScaler VPX Express virtual machine (an interesting bit of tech for a later article).

So how does this tie into server hosting?

You've probably had a time when your monitoring has indicated a service ceasing to respond on a server. If all you have is a cell phone the options are somewhat limited. With a fancy enough phone you might have an SSH or RDP client but do you really want to do anything on a PDA sized screen? I didn't think so. You can put in a ticket from your phone and our support can help out but the person best able to fix a service failure is still going to be you, the server administrator who knows where all the bodies are buried and how the bits tie together.

A small netbook can be a lightweight (and inexpensive) administration terminal for your servers hosted with us. Just find an Internet connection, connect up to the SoftLayer VPN and now you have complete access to work on your servers via a secure connection.

Through the wonders of the IPMI KVM this access even includes the console which opens up the possibility of doing a custom kernel build and install safely, while sitting under the stars, drinking a hot chocolate and watching the local nightlife.

Sounds like a pretty nice reality to me.