Pre-configuration and Upgrades

July 1, 2009

I recently bought a new computer for my wife. Being a developer, and a former hardware engineering student, I opted the buy the parts and assemble the machine ourselves. Actually assembling a computer these days doesn't take too long, it's the software that really gets you. Windows security updates, driver packs, incompatibilities, inconsistencies, broken websites, and just plain bad code plagued me for most of the night. The video card, in particular, has a “known issue” where it just “uh-oh” turns off the monitor when Windows starts. The issue was first reported in March of 2006, and has yet to be fixed.

This is why SoftLayer always tests and verifies the configurations we offer. We don't make the end user discover on their own that Debian doesn't work on Nehalems, we install it first to be sure. This is also why our order forms prevent customers from ordering pre-installed software that are incompatible with any of the rest of the order. We want to make sure that customers avoid the frustration of ordering things only to find out later that they don't work together.

The problem with desktop computers, especially for people who are particular about their configurations, is that you cannot buy a pre-configured machine where all the parts are exactly what you want. We attempted to get a computer from Dell, and HP, but neither company would even display all the specifications we were interested in, nevermind actually having the parts we desired. Usually pre-built systems skimp on important things like the motherboard or the power supply, giving you very little room to upgrade.

At SoftLayer, we don't cut corners on our systems, and we ensure that each customer can upgrade as high as they possibly can. Each machine type can support more RAM and hard drives than the default level, and we normally have spare machines handy at all levels so that once you outgrow the expansion capabilities of your current box, you can move to a new system type. If you're thinking of getting a dedicated server, but you're worried about the cost, visit the SoftLayer Outlet Store and start small. We have single-core Pentium Ds in the outlet store, and you can upgrade from there until you're running a 24-core Xeon system.