The Tao of the Slayer

April 22, 2009

In the ever-changing world of IT, there are few times when a technician gets to relax. There are always new issues, new products/services, and long hours of investigation. However, once in awhile you find a moment of Zen in all the commotion: Rack Prep.

Recently, I had assigned myself to Rack Prep to allow my teammates to focus on their other duties. During this time, I was able to complete a large portion of the rack assembly process and release myself from the direct stresses of the IT environment in a busy NOC (network operations center).

The preparation of new racks in the datacenter is an arduous (and sometimes monotonous) task, but gives a technician time to reflect on his accomplishments and direction for his career. There are no distractions, other than the occasional dropped cage nut or screw. This allows the free mind to ponder the inner workings of itself and the body it inhabits.

I thought about the first time I had installed a rack rail. I had only been working in IT for a few months and was assigned to the task due to my lack of knowledge on the other portions of the project. I learned a lot that summer about architecture of hardware, networks, and even business.

I had time to think about how I had arrived at one of the fastest-growing host providers in the world. All the different places I had worked. I remembered the people who shared information – technical or otherwise – which had furthered my ability to solve issues – in servers and myself.

I remembered the managers and supervisors that I looked up to and hope to emulate in my current position in management. I was trying to remember all the wisdom which had been passed to me, leading me to reevaluate my approach and initiatives.

In short, the Rack Prep allowed me to reflect on all the things in my life. I was able to forget the current project while mindlessly pushing in cage nuts and look at my career from a wider perspective. Luckily, I can say that I am proud of how far I have come. Now, I have to install the cables which require much more thought. I better leave the Zen and continue with the task at hand.

.IIIi

Comments

April 23rd, 2009 at 2:44am

Ahhh- the cabling side of rack prep. A true art form.

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Comments

April 23rd, 2009 at 2:44am

Ahhh- the cabling side of rack prep. A true art form.

Leave a Reply

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