Think Large, Think Global!

November 6, 2009

As an executive at Softlayer, one of the things that I am amazed by is the number of unique and extremely innovative ideas that we see on a daily basis from our customers. We love the fact that these groups understand the value of what we do, while focusing their energy on their core competencies. It’s the perfect relationship for us and one that we try to cultivate and grow continuously.

One of the challenges that we face is sharing information related to the entire breadth of our service offerings in a simple and useful way. Our business model is such that the cycle from first contact to purchase decision tends to be short. Most customers typically come in with a specified set of required services. We often hear comments like “we didn’t know you offered that as well” from customers that come to us with a shopping list and take advantage of the self-service capabilities that we offer. Global load balancing, CDN, and Data Center to Data Center back-up are all examples of products that we have heard get overlooked. It’s a tough balance between over selling and allowing a tech savvy customer work his way through the waters (so to speak).

One of the other challenges that we face here is overcoming the “we don’t need that” syndrome. I look at it practically and associate it with insurance and how it’s never needed, until something occurs that it makes it a must have. In tech terms, I recently read an article on CNNMoney.com “The Tech Catastrophe you’re ignoring” that typifies this “we don’t need that syndrome”. The article encompasses the idea of back-ups for your data. There is discussion that the business of dead drive recovery globally is up staggering rates and it’s due to the lack of people backing up data on a continuous basis. We hear this loud and clear at SoftLayer when a customer would accidentally lose data that they wish they would have spent the extra few dollars a month to back up. It seems trivial post incident, but pre incident it’s one of those decisions that gets passed on quite frequently.

As mentioned, the uniqueness and innovation that lives in SoftLayer’s service offering is tremendous. As our CEO hammers home the message of think large and think global to us every day, I want to pass that message onto our customers. What you do is driving industry, innovation and all that comes along with it. We hope that the decision making process for you as a customer is driven by thinking large and thinking globally and that you take advantage of the solutions that we offer to make your work more functional, more secure, more robust, and more effective. I can’t imagine telling my boss that ‘we didn’t need that’ if it was something that we did need and it was right in front of me. I am sure many of you share that sentiment!

Comments

November 6th, 2009 at 4:12pm

Well said Sean.

I think many well-intentioned system administrators skip proper backup technologies for a variety of reasons, including a feeling to high cost or a fundamental misunderstanding of proper disaster recovery strategy.

When faced with the challenge of a proper backup solution being too costly, my immediate response is typically "How much is your business worth?"

Is $100/yr, $250/yr, even $500/yr too expensive to protect a business that is worth 5000 times or more?

Backups are cheap. Data loss, re-development of applications, lost revenues from customers who move to the competitor and all manners of similar effects of disaster are not cheap.

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Comments

November 6th, 2009 at 4:12pm

Well said Sean.

I think many well-intentioned system administrators skip proper backup technologies for a variety of reasons, including a feeling to high cost or a fundamental misunderstanding of proper disaster recovery strategy.

When faced with the challenge of a proper backup solution being too costly, my immediate response is typically "How much is your business worth?"

Is $100/yr, $250/yr, even $500/yr too expensive to protect a business that is worth 5000 times or more?

Backups are cheap. Data loss, re-development of applications, lost revenues from customers who move to the competitor and all manners of similar effects of disaster are not cheap.

Leave a Reply

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