Once a Bug Killer, Now a Killer Setup

December 2, 2010

Not everyone enjoys or has the benefit of taking what they learn at work to apply at home in personal situations, but I consider myself lucky because the things I learn from work can often be very useful for hobbies in my own time. As an electronics and PC gaming fanatic, I always enjoy tips that would increase the performance of my technological equipment. Common among PC gaming enthusiasts is the obsession with making their gaming rig excel in every aspect by upgrading video card, ram, processor, etc. Before working at SoftLayer, I had only considered buying better hardware to improve performance but never really looked into the advantages of different types of setups for a computer.

This new area of exploration for me started shortly after my first days at SoftLayer when I was introduced to RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) for our servers. In the past, I had heard mention of the term but never had any idea of what that entailed and was only familiar with our good ole bug killer brand Raid. You can imagine my excitement as I learned more about its intricacies and how the different types of RAID could benefit my computer’s performance.

Armed with this new knowledge, I was determined to reconfigure my gaming pc at home to reap the benefits. Upon looking at the different RAID setups, I decided to go with a RAID 0 because I did not want to sacrifice storage space and my data was not critical enough that I would need a mirror such as provided with RAID 1.

One thing led to another as I became occupied for a good amount of time with benchmarking drive performance in my old setup versus my new setup. In the end, I was happy to report a significant performance gain in what I now refer to as my “killer setup”. Applications would launch noticeably faster and even in games where videos were stored locally on hard drives, the cinematic scenes would come up faster than before.

To add to the hype, a coworker was also building a new computer in anticipation of a new game called Final Fantasy XIV. It felt like a competition to exceed each other with better scores. I’m already planning ahead for future upgrades since this time around I had only used SATA drives. For my next upgrade I would love to run a RAID 0 with two SSD drives to see what kind of boost I would get.

So for business or pleasure, have you ever considered the benefits of setting up a RAID system?

-Danny