Maintnenance FTW

January 18, 2010

I am a bit of an automotive enthusiast, so when I'm not working, I do spend a fair amount of time browsing automotive websites. I, like many people in the hosting industry, crave information. I like hearing about new design directions, emerging technologies, and past stories about others' experiences with their vehicles. While browsing, I came across some images of the guts of a BMW that had gone in excess of 60 thousand miles without an engine oil change. Needless to say, the internals were slathered with a gummy sludge and the engine was ruined.

Many technologies we use these days have become so common place and are operationally intuitive enough that we are often able to figure them out and use them without ever having to crack open an owner’s manual. I bring this up because, many technologies in the hosting industry follow suit. There are a number of developers who create software that is designed to make it easy to host websites. They are marketed as the only solution you ever need and, in some cases, imply that all you need to know is how to use a web browser to successfully host websites, not only for oneself but a plethora of other clients too! The servers run themselves, and you only need to spend a few minutes setting your clients up! It's like free money!

Unfortunately, as the owner of the previously mentioned BMW found out, this is not the case. There are a lot more things going on behind the scenes than just seats and a steering wheel, as are the same with servers. On occasion, we receive support tickets that just say "the site stopped working." In an attempt to gather more information, we will often ask the client a wide range of questions that help us find the problem faster and come up with the best possible solution. However, sometimes the answer from the customer is, "I haven't touched or logged into the server in days/ months/ (hopefully not) years." The more relevant metaphor for this is, "I haven't changed my BMW's oil in years!" Servers are like any other complex machine. They require constant maintenance. This includes: updating anti-virus definitions, monitoring bandwidth usage for anomalous spikes, rotating logs out if they are getting too large (provided some other rotation scheme is not already in place), keeping an eye on disk space usage, and creating a disaster recovery plan and backups. So take some time, get to know your server, and familiarize yourself with good preventative maintenance techniques. Your server, your clients, and your BMW (if applicable) will love you for it.

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