A Melting Pot of Techies

December 16, 2011

Now that I've had about twelve years of work experience, I'm at a point in my life where I can't really claim to be "young" or "inexperienced" anymore. Throughout my professional career, I've been exposed to many different types of work environments, and I must say that never have I encountered as diverse a work force as the one I work with now at SoftLayer *ndash; everything from family background to hobbies.

Since my first day at SoftLayer, I've been amazed to learn about all the different places my coworkers have come from. To name a few that stood out and to give you an idea of how diverse our team is, I have colleagues that are from Madagascar, Sri Lanka, El Salvador, Korea, Japan, and even "Texas." It is fascinating to learn more about other cultures from them, and because we work together every day, I have a lot of great opportunities to do so.

To take this concept of diversity even further, as I got to know my coworkers more, I soon realized that our differences extended significantly beyond nationality since we have such varied personal hobbies and interests from all walks of life. I've gotten to know individuals that are into acting for short films, piloting airplanes, live-action role playing, skateboarding, cooking, car drifting, and barbecuing. You may not find this unusual if you've have encountered people with similar interests at some point in your lives, but to have them all in a single workplace is pretty incredible to me.

Despite all these differences in nationality and personal interests, we all share the same passion for computer hardware and software that is an integral part of the business services that SoftLayer offers. We could talk for hours on end about the different technologies, and even with all of our differences, SoftLayer's unified, inviting corporate culture makes it easy for us to share a passion for excellent customer support. If you talk to Lance, you'll hear him say that the customer experience is the only thing that matters to him, and when your CEO lives and breathes that mantra, it's easy for everyone to follow.

When I first heard about the plans to expand overseas into Amsterdam and Singapore, I was a little nervous at the challenge, but when I started to think about it, our business model has always involved employing diverse talents with a common goal that could be implemented essentially anywhere in the world with little difficulty.

SoftLayer has become a great melting pot of technical staff, and because new employees are rapidly assimilated into the team, their unique interests and personalities immediately become a part of the far-reaching (and growing) landscape of SoftLayer diversity.

Want to bring some of your diversity to our team? Right now we have 50+ open positions in almost every department of the company and in every location. Just promise when you join our team that you'll send me a message to introduce yourself!

-Danny

Comments

December 16th, 2011 at 12:48pm

I couldn't help but think of Ron Burgundy's definition of 'diversity' as I was reading this post: "I could be wrong, but I believe 'diversity' is an old, old, wooden ship that was used during the Civil War era." :-)

December 18th, 2011 at 8:33am

Hello Danny,

Along with diversity I think Softlayer fundamentally has it's focus set on the right thing. It is all about customer service at the end of it all, whether external or internal. What about your internal processes? Are there any standards and architectural teams that define your technology strategies? Do you encourage telecommuting and other options for your technology workers to work remotely? Thanks for sharing the specifics around diversity at Softlayer. It was an interesting read.

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Comments

December 16th, 2011 at 12:48pm

I couldn't help but think of Ron Burgundy's definition of 'diversity' as I was reading this post: "I could be wrong, but I believe 'diversity' is an old, old, wooden ship that was used during the Civil War era." :-)

December 18th, 2011 at 8:33am

Hello Danny,

Along with diversity I think Softlayer fundamentally has it's focus set on the right thing. It is all about customer service at the end of it all, whether external or internal. What about your internal processes? Are there any standards and architectural teams that define your technology strategies? Do you encourage telecommuting and other options for your technology workers to work remotely? Thanks for sharing the specifics around diversity at Softlayer. It was an interesting read.

Leave a Reply

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