Bringing Home Data Center Security

May 31, 2011

Look at any time period in mankind's history, and you'll come to the undeniable conclusion that technology changes the daily lives people in any society. With the evolution of technology, our lives have gotten so much easier. Consider all the little luxuries and conveniences available now to get tasks done in the workplace and home. Unfortunately, our rapid technological advancements aren't necessarily exclusive to the "good guys" ... The "bad guys" are benefiting from new technologies as well. Crime and theft have become more sophisticated, and as a result, more technological advancement has to be pursued in security, and it's pretty remarkable to see some of the security measures and technologies put in place by companies like SoftLayer.

The day I started working here, I thought I was actually joining the CIA. I had to undergo several procedures to gain access to all the facilities: I had my photo taken and my fingerprints scanned before I registered for multiple key cards. The first job I had out of college only required its employees to have a single key card that allowed entrance through one door with access to all areas. Needless to say, it was a lot different to work in such a secure environment.

To give you an idea of what kinds of security we have at our data center, I'll walk you through my daily experience. I step into our lobby and am usually greeted by multiple security guards behind what appears to be bullet-proof glass. I have to pass a fingerprint scanner and numerous secured door checkpoints to get into the office. Every move is under the scrutiny of video cameras recording every square inch of the building. Big Brother is always watching, and for SoftLayer customers, that should be reassuring.

The facility's security reminds me of the movie Minority Report, and while those security measures may seem unnecessary or excessive, they're actually just visible evidence of SoftLayer's focus on the importance of security both online and in the physical realm.

Thinking about safety, I've also started considering heightening security at my home with a few security cameras. Some of my friends joke that this consideration is a sign of impending paranoia, but the "better safe than sorry" mantra should always be kept close to heart when it comes to protecting valuables. Apparently, I'm not alone in my home security research ... A day after writing a good portion of this article, I came to work and in the morning a coworker told me he'd recently bought a security camera with night vision for personal use. I didn't expect such a coincidence, and of course I enthusiastically replied to my coworker that I was thinking about making a similar purchase.

In closing, I'd like to ask you if you've entertained the idea of increasing security in your own home, and if so, do you have any suggestions about what equipment to purchase and features that prove useful? I doubt I'll go as far as hiring security guards and installing fingerprint scanners, but you never know!

-Danny

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