SoftLayer's Android Client Gets an Extreme Makeover

May 3, 2011

One of the things you expect when you merge two organizations in the same vertical space is for your talent pool to get deeper. SoftLayer had a seriously talented bunch of developers before the merger - I should know, I consider myself one of them - and as I was promised would be the case, after the merger, we were joined by an equally talented group of engineers from The Planet. Where we had two low-level developers, now we have four. Where we had a dozen guys with .NET experience, now we have twenty. It's better for us employees, and better for our customers too.

What I didn't expect as part of the merger was that our talent pool would get wider. No, I don't mean we now employ an army of body builders and Siamese twins. I mean as result of the merger, we ended up with an entirely new group of folks here unlike any SL previously had on the payroll. This new and exotic breed of folks - new and exotic at least from my perspective - are collectively known as "user experience" engineers.

I admit (and I suspect most software engineers will concur) when I develop something, it becomes my baby. Each software engineer has his or her own method for inciting that spark of genius ... I start out with some ideas on a yellow pad, refine them until I can whip up an actual spec, code some unit tests and wait to see if my baby takes its first step or falls flat on its digital face. Either way, over time with gentle nudging and TLC, eventually an application grows. And like any loving parent I'm certain that my application can do no wrong.

So when I was told a "usability study" would be done on one of my babies by the user experience, team you can imagine what went through my mind. After all, I was there when the first API call succeeded. I was the one who got up in the middle of the night when the application got cranky and decided to throw an unhandled exception. Who the heck are these user interface specialist and what do they know that I don't?

In retrospect, I couldn't have been more wrong. I am a professional coder with more than a decade of experience under my belt. But I'm often more interested in how I can squeeze a few more CPU cycles out of a sub-routine than how much easier it would be for the user if I rearranged the order of the GUI's a little bit. The user interface review I received really got me thinking from a user's perspective and excited about the application in a way I hadn't been since the early days when I banged out those first few lines of code.

Two weeks ago, we released a new, radically different looking Android client. If you are a current user of the application, you've undoubtedly received an OTA update by now, and I hope you are as pleasantly surprised by the result as I am. For those of you with Android phones who have not installed the SoftLayer client, I encourage you to do so. You can get more info by visiting http://www.softlayer.com/resources/mobile-apps/.

Before I let you go, what kind of father would I be if I didn't take out my wallet and bore you to tears with pictures of my children? Without further ado, I present to you the latest and greatest Android Mobile Client:

SL Android App

SL Android App

SL Android App

SL Android App

-William

Comments

 

May 3rd, 2011 at 11:52am

I've been using the Android application for a few months and it's definitely an improvement. I've also played with it on an Android tablet (rooted Nook Color) and it's also quite pleasant although there are some sizing issues.

One thing to note is the ticket view doesn't really play nice when tilted / horizontal.

May 3rd, 2011 at 10:55pm

Definitely an improvement, even if most of it seems to be eyecandy.

One thing that keeps me wondering is why all password fields on Android still forces dots. With the OSK not being very precise I usually take 10 attempts to type it right. Come on, who is going to watch over my shoulder as I enter the password and it displays in tiny-winy fonts on the display. At least make it an option to display it.

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Comments

 

May 3rd, 2011 at 11:52am

I've been using the Android application for a few months and it's definitely an improvement. I've also played with it on an Android tablet (rooted Nook Color) and it's also quite pleasant although there are some sizing issues.

One thing to note is the ticket view doesn't really play nice when tilted / horizontal.

May 3rd, 2011 at 10:55pm

Definitely an improvement, even if most of it seems to be eyecandy.

One thing that keeps me wondering is why all password fields on Android still forces dots. With the OSK not being very precise I usually take 10 attempts to type it right. Come on, who is going to watch over my shoulder as I enter the password and it displays in tiny-winy fonts on the display. At least make it an option to display it.

Leave a Reply

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