Of Cage Nuts and Customer Service

April 6, 2012

Sometimes it's the little hardships and annoyances that really mold you. How do you react? Do you manage to work through them, or do you let them eat away at you to the point that you're more paralyzed by them than you are a bigger problem?

As a new hire, I was required to take part in a Truck Day — an experience that helps everyone in the company understand (at a base level) what is involved with the actual products and services we sell. If you've ever had the fortune of working on one, there are certain activities that can leave you feeling weary. For me, that weariness-inducing activity was working with cage nuts.

For those of you unfamiliar with cage nuts, they're small pieces of metal that accommodate screw-in server rails on a rack meant for slide-in server rails. Installing them is one of the most frustrating things ever ... They have two little clips that fit inside the rack, and you have to bend them to get them in. Here's a great illustration of how they work from an Oracle Sun Rack user's guide:

Cage Nuts

I'd installed them before, but never more than eight or so at a time. After Truck Day, I now have nothing but the greatest respect for the amazing people working in the data centers who have to do them in massive volumes. I don't think I've ever received as many tiny cuts on my hand as I did in the few hours I spent installing the relatively small number I managed to complete.

As a Customer Support Administrator (CSA), I spend the majority of my time sitting at a computer, helping customers with their servers and doing my best to resolve issues as they are encountered. Physically installing cage nuts isn't part of my day-to-day responsibilities (until the next Truck Day), but I realized that my job has its own "cage nuts."

A customer wanting to lease a server from us isn't particularly worried about the fact that cage nuts have to be meticulously installed in the rack, and they also aren't paying any mind to the fact I might have worked with a dozen customers in my shift already — And, certainly, they shouldn't. They're paying for a great customer experience and helpful, friendly service, so they don't need to take into account the context of our operations when they're simply asking for us to help them with a server reboot to finish the installation of an OS patch upgrade.

SoftLayer, as a company, has amazed me in that everyone I've met is not only willing to deal with their "cage nuts," but they will also do so without losing the smile from their face (even if there's some good-natured grumbling every now and then). In many of the places I've worked, this sort of task would be met with protest, foot dragging and a tired resignation to doing the work. That simply isn't the case here.

I'm definitely a newbie around here, and I'm still getting a feel for the culture, catching up on the inside jokes, and learning the ins and outs of the company (and the people in it). The one thing that was abundantly clear to me from the very first night, though: SLayers are truly dedicated to what they do, and the resulting work environment is one that fosters and rewards that dedication.

So in my estimation, how have the little annoyances — the cage nuts of our lives — molded SoftLayer and the people who work here? I'd say that not only do we work through them, we do so enthusiastically in the company of friends, proud of the fact that these seemingly small things are part of what has made this all possible.

I hope all of you work in environments that enable you to deal with the small things you see every day without cursing under your breath and feeling stressed. If you don't, maybe you should look into finding a place that does. I hear we're hiring.

-Gregory

Comments

April 7th, 2012 at 8:47am

Gregory, thank you for sharing.

We've been a SoftLayer customer for a few years now with servers spread out in two of your several day centers.

I'm thankful that you and your team run such an effective data center operation that I don't have to call support on a regular basis (typically when I do call, it is an emergency).

When I have called, every single time, the person on SoftLayer's end showed patience and kindness.

If you have every been in an emergency, I'm sure you can appreciate that when the people around you show patience and kindness, it goes along way in helping everyone remain calm knowing the problem(s) will be worked out.

Thank you, Gregory, for sharing, for your smile, for your patience and kindness, and being a part of a great team.

April 19th, 2012 at 2:52pm

Great post. Love the analogy of "cage nuts", something we deal with frequently for clients in the customer service and quality assurance industries.

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Comments

April 7th, 2012 at 8:47am

Gregory, thank you for sharing.

We've been a SoftLayer customer for a few years now with servers spread out in two of your several day centers.

I'm thankful that you and your team run such an effective data center operation that I don't have to call support on a regular basis (typically when I do call, it is an emergency).

When I have called, every single time, the person on SoftLayer's end showed patience and kindness.

If you have every been in an emergency, I'm sure you can appreciate that when the people around you show patience and kindness, it goes along way in helping everyone remain calm knowing the problem(s) will be worked out.

Thank you, Gregory, for sharing, for your smile, for your patience and kindness, and being a part of a great team.

April 19th, 2012 at 2:52pm

Great post. Love the analogy of "cage nuts", something we deal with frequently for clients in the customer service and quality assurance industries.

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