Tips and Tricks - jQuery Lazy Load Plugin

September 26, 2012

In the late 90's, web pages presented their information in a relatively structured fashion, with little concern on how "pretty" the content looked. To a certain extent, that was a result of available technology and resources being a little more limited, but much of the reason was probably because we had no idea what was possible. We've come a long way, my friend. These days, it's tough to spend an hour online without coming across a gorgeous web site with huge animations, a pallet of every color possible, full-width backgrounds and high definition detail.

Those sites may be aesthetically pleasing, but they can be a big pain from a developer's perspective.

How much load does all of that stuff put on the server every time that web page is visited? As developers, it's our job to think about both what the visitor sees AND the visitor's experience in seeing it. Even the most beautiful sites will be ignored if a page takes too long to load. We spend hours optimizing every detail so users can fluidly browse without having to wait. It was in one of these optimization sessions that I discovered "lazy load."

To be honest, I wasn't too fond of the word "lazy" in the name, and I especially wasn't fond of having to explain to my boss that *I* wasn't being lazy ... The jQuery plugin is *named* "Lazy Load." Lazy Load effectively allows large pieces of content to stay in the backlog until they're needed. To give you an example of what that looks like, let's say you have a website with three humungous images, but they're all in different locations. Instead of pushing the entire load onto the user when they first land on your page, we can break them up and have them load only when the user goes to view them. We're not reducing the size of the web page; we're merely helping it work smarter.

Without Lazy Load, a normal web page loads each item when its page is visited. If a website has videos, music, images and some neat user interactivity applications, each of those items will load at the same time:

Lazy Load Illustration

If you take into consideration how large each of those items are, you can sense the problem. The user only has so much bandwidth to load these items, and something's gotta give. Usually, it means long loading times. We can't control how fast each user's ISP is, but we can reorder our items and let Lazy Load help us prioritize items and load the page more efficiently.

After we snag Lazy Load on Github (jquery.lazyload.js), we put our jQuery scripts in the <head> of our page:

<script src="jquery.js" type="text/javascript"></script> 
<script src="jquery.lazyload.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

Now that the plugin is available to us, we need to determine what we want to load lazily. Images are probably one of the most bothersome page elements, so let's apply Lazy Load to the images we load in the belazy class. In the <head> of your page (or in the footer if you prefer your JavaScript entries there), you'll add:

<script type="text/javascript">$("img.belazy").lazyload();</script>

As a result of that function, all image tags with a class of belazy will have Lazy Load run on them. This helps us ensure that we're not loading ALL of our images lazily. Now we need to choose which images we want to apply Lazy Load to.

Let's say the image tag of the largest image on one of our page looks like this:

<img src="bighonkingimage.png"/>

To have the lazyload function apply to it, we just have to make a couple tweaks:

<img class="belazy" src="bighonkingimage.png" data-original="bighonkingimage.png"/>

We added class="belazy" to trigger the lazyload function, and we added data-original="bighonkingimage.png" to line up with the formatting required by the newest version of Lazy Load (it's simply a repeat of the source).

When a user visits our page, bighonkingimage.png will load only when it's needed!

Pretty neat, eh?

-Cassandra