Building a Mobile App with jQuery Mobile: The Foundation

September 20, 2013

Based on conversations I've had in the past, at least half of web developers I've met have admitted to cracking open an Objective-C book at some point in their careers with high hopes of learning mobile development ... After all, who wouldn't want to create "the next big thing" for a market growing so phenomenally every year? I count myself among that majority: I've been steadily learning Objective-C over the past year, dedicating a bit of time every day, and I feel like I still lack skill-set required to create an original, complex application. Wouldn't it be great if we web developers could finally get our shot in the App Store without having to unlearn and relearn the particulars of coding a mobile application?

Luckily for us: There is!

The rock stars over at jQuery have created a framework called jQuery Mobile that allows developers to create cross-platform, responsive applications on a HTML5-based jQuery foundation. The framework allows for touch and mouse event support, so you're able to publish across multiple platforms, including iOS, Android, Blackberry, Kindle, Nook and on and on and on. If you're able to create web applications with jQuery, you can now create an awesome cross-platform app. All you have to do is create an app as if it was a dynamic HTML5 web page, and jQuery takes care of the rest.

Let's go through a real-world example to show this functionality in action. The first thing we need to do is fill in the <head> content with all of our necessary jQuery libraries:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>SoftLayer Hello World!</title>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.3.2/jquery.mobile-1.3.2.min.css" />
    <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.9.1.min.js"></script>
    <script src="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.3.2/jquery.mobile-1.3.2.min.js"></script>
</head>

Now let's create a framework for our simplistic app in the <body> section of our page:

<body>
    <div data-role="page">
        <div data-role="header">
            <h1>My App!</h1>
        </div>
 
        <div data-role="content">
            <p>This is my application! Pretty cool, huh?</p>
        </div>
 
        <div data-role="footer">
            <h1>Bottom Footer</h1>
        </div>
 
    </div>
</body>
</html>

Even novice web developers should recognize the structure above. You have a header, content and a footer just as you would in a regular web page, but we're letting jQuery apply some "native-like" styling to those sections with the data-role attributes. This is what our simple app looks like so far: jQuery Mobile App Screenshot #1

While it's not very fancy (yet), you see that the style is well suited to the iPhone I'm using to show it off. Let's spice it up a bit and add a navigation bar. Since we want the navigation to be a part of the header section of our app, let's add an unordered list there:

<div data-role="header">
    <h1>My App!</h1>
        <div data-role="navbar">
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#home" class="ui-btn-active" data-icon="home" data-theme="b">Home</a></li>
                <li><a href="#softlayer_cool_news" data-icon="grid" data-theme="b">SL Cool News!</a></li>
                <li><a href="#softlayer_cool_stuff" data-icon="star" data-theme="b">SL Cool Stuff!</a></li>
            </ul>
        </div>
    </div>

You'll notice again that it's not much different from regular HTML. We've created a navbar div with an unordered list of menu items we'd like to add to the header: Home, SL Cool News and SL Cool Stuff. Notice in the anchor tag of each that there's an attribute called data-icon which defines which graphical icon we want to represent the navigation item. Let's have a peek at what it looks like now: jQuery Mobile App Screenshot #2

Our app isn't doing a whole lot yet, but you can see from our screenshot that the pieces are starting to come together nicely. Because we're developing our mobile app as an HTML5 app first, we're able to make quick changes and see those changes in real time from our phone's browser. Once we get the functionality we want to into our app, we can use a tool such as PhoneGap or Cordova to package our app into a ready-to-use standalone iPhone app (provided you're enrolled in the Apple Development Program, of course), or we can leave the app as-is for a very nifty mobile browser application.

In my next few blogs, I plan to expand on this topic by showing you some of the amazingly easy (and impressive) functionality available in jQuery Mobile. In the meantime, go grab a copy of jQuery Mobile and start playing around with it!

-Cassandra

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