August 19, 2015

Selling Cloud in the Cloud

August 19, 2015

Conventionally, the sales department’s style consists of men and women dressed to the nines—tailored suits and expensive Italian shoes. Appearance is a key factor to success, and most follow and master S.C.O.T.S.M.A.N., a forecasting and qualification system that stands for scope, competition, originality, time, size, money, authority, and need (we’ll get to this later).

Once a prospective client is qualified, they are placed in the sales funnel, and that’s when the fun begins. Deals are made over fancy dinners or a round of golf. Factors like location and size determine the time it takes to close the deal. Sometimes it takes days. Sometimes it takes months.

But in the cloud industry, where “on-demand” is the name of the game, following the conventional sales process can be a bottleneck in and of itself. Cloud, by its very nature, allows for spontaneity—such that by the time conventional salesmen arrange a wine-and-dine meeting, the new breed of cloud salesmen have already closed the deal and happy customers are accessing their deployed servers.

In the cloud, there’s no time for face-to-face with the customer, so most opt for comfortable t-shirts and jeans over tailored suits and fine Italian leather shoes. And in the absence of these things, products and services provide the wow factor that lure customers.

SoftLayer offers a variety of wow factors. Depending on how the customer will be using servers based on their business, any of the points below (or combination of them) could serve as a wow factor:

  • Free incoming and server-to-server data transfer, as well as bandwidth pooling
  • Auto Scale and rapid deployment (virtual servers in as little as five to 10 minutes and bare metal in as little as one to four hours)
  • Free, premium, round-the-clock technical, billing, and sales support
  • Complete control and flexibility
  • Dedicated basic server resources, including CPU, RAM and storage, on all server types
  • No long-term contracts
  • Seamless connectivity between virtual and bare metal platforms

Although the cloud marketplace today looks saturated, the providers offering genuine cloud services are few and far between, and the disparity between the services they offer are abundant, laying waste to the theory that cloud is a commodity. Today, there are ads boasting price advantages and overtly dramatized high-pitch marketing punch lines promising unrealistic offerings. Remember the old adage, “The bitterness of low quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.”

Given the control and flexibility inherent in the SoftLayer platform with no contract to tie you down, the SoftLayer sales process cuts through the clutter and seeks to satisfy the last three elements of the S.C.O.T.S.M.A.N. system:

  • Is there a need for a new cloud environment? Are you looking to host a new application or are you looking to move an existing application from another hosting provider or from an in-house environment? If existing, what are your primary reasons for wanting to move?
  • Do you have a budget for a new cloud environment?
  • Do you have the authority to place an order on behalf of your organization? (To make it easy, it will cost $0.00 for the first month with a no-strings attached cancellation if you’re not satisfied.)

Some cloud consumers I have spoken to confess to choosing their hosting provider based on convenience rather than value offering. Cloud providers who are household names try as much as they can to blur the differences between offerings and propagate the doctrine of cloud being a commodity. As the cloud marketplace matures, the success of this strategy has an expiration date—soon!

- Valentine Che, Global Sales, AMS01

Comments

August 19th, 2015 at 8:05pm

Whilst this might be true when dealing with a SME customers, it does not apply to the Enterprise market. Sales people selling cloud are typically better equipped with knowledge on what it takes to deliver a complex solution. In a green field deployment, which seldom happens, you might not require any workshops, PM or technical expertise either but that all changes when looking at a hybrid roll out which by the way occurs 95% of the time in the Enterprise space

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Comments

August 19th, 2015 at 8:05pm

Whilst this might be true when dealing with a SME customers, it does not apply to the Enterprise market. Sales people selling cloud are typically better equipped with knowledge on what it takes to deliver a complex solution. In a green field deployment, which seldom happens, you might not require any workshops, PM or technical expertise either but that all changes when looking at a hybrid roll out which by the way occurs 95% of the time in the Enterprise space

Leave a Reply

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.