Author Archive: Cassandra Wolff

October 23, 2014

CSS3 Tips and Tricks – Mastering Multiple Backgrounds

I’ve written a lot of blog posts, some on our very own SoftLayer Development Network, but most of them have been posted right here on SoftLayer’s main blog. One of the most popular is a tutorial I wrote on being able to create a customized background depending on the user’s location. For example: A person visiting a website from the United States during the daytime may see a beautiful yellow background with an orange glow and a bright yellow sun just above the horizon, while a surfer from China may see the same website, but with a dark purple background with subtle white stars and a shimmering moon because it is night. The example I wrote customized the CSS to the time zone based on locale tailoring the site with a more personal touch.

The demand for sites to serve a more interactive experience has always been large in volume, but few websites actually deliver.

Luckily, our Web languages are evolving all of the time, and since I’ve written the “What time is it for you?” blog on our SLDN, more advancements have been made to the background functionality and browser compatibility. This means MORE browsers support these new features, and it’s compliant across the board!

Let’s start off with our usual HTML document (with an addition of an empty div for now, this is where we’re going to master our background techniques).

<html>
<head>
    <title>CSS3 Tips and Tricks – Mastering Multiple Backgrounds</title>
</head>
<body>
    <div class=”slBackgrounds”></div>
</body>
</html>

With CSS3, we can define multiple backgrounds in one declaration, like this:

background: url('earth.png') no-repeat top 30px center, url('star_bg.png') repeat-y center;

By separating each background with just a comma, we’re able to declare many backgrounds for one div. Let’s go ahead and add our multi-background CSS in the <head> of our document:

<style>
    .slBackgrounds {
        width: 300px;
        height: 300px;
        margin: 0 auto;
        background: url('earth.png') no-repeat top 30px center, url('star_bg.png') repeat-y center;
        transition:background-position 600s;
    }
 
    .slBackgrounds:hover {
        background-position: top 30px center, 0px 60000px;
    }
</style>

After adding the CSS styling, you should have something that looks similar to the following:

You’ll notice I added a transition property to the .slBackgrounds class, and I bet you’re wondering why? Everybody has their own learning technique that helps them absorb concepts better and faster than other methods. My learning method (and probably 75 percent of other developers) happens to be the challenge technique: When I learn something new, I think about something extremely fun and challenging that I would like to do with this newfound knowledge beyond just the base use. For instance, why learn how to use multiple backgrounds with CSS3 and just have a five-line blog when we can learn to use multiple backgrounds, AND create an awesome animation sequence that can jazz up the old and boring background system?

Not only does this jazz it up, but by using additions such as the transition and :hover properties, we’re able to open new doors to possibilities with interactivity.

If you haven’t guessed already, the .slBackgrounds:hover section covers what should happen to the .slBackgrounds div when the user hovers over it; in this case, there’s a background-position declaration. The ‘top 30px center’ applies to the first background image, and the ‘0px 60000px’ applies to the second (gotta love multiple backgrounds!).

Go ahead and hover over our images! You should see something like this:

Something pretty simple, but I bet you can already think of a hundred things you can do with the CSS3 multiple background ability, huh? The great news is that the cross-browser compatibility is awesome and supports all newer browsers and most reasonably older ones too! And to think . . . barely five or six years ago it took MUCH more innovative coding and workarounds to achieve results like this without just embedding a flash file or an animated gif!

We’d love to hear how YOU’RE using multiple backgrounds!

- Cassandra

October 16, 2014

#T4 – Tips and Tricks–jQuery Select2

Who doesn’t like a walk down memory lane? In our #T4 series, SoftLayer brings back popular tech tip blog posts. #ThrowbackThursday #T4 #ThrowbackThursdayTechTips

Creating a drop-down menu? Here’s an abridged version of our Tips and Tricks – jQuery Select2 Plugin post from two years ago tomorrow!

Turn your drop-down menu from this:
Option Select

To this:

Pretty Option Select

  1. Download Select2 and upload it to your server.
  2. Add the jQuery library and scripts to the <head> of the page document:
  3. <script src="jquery.js" type="text/javascript"></script> 
    <script src="select2.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  4. Add Select2's included style sheet:
  5. <link href="select2.css" rel="stylesheet"/>

  6. Before closing the <head> tag, invoke the Select2 function:
  7. <script>
    $(document).ready(function() { $("#selectPretty").select2(); });
    </script>
  8. Then add the #selectPretty ID to the select element you want to improve:
    <select id="selectPretty">
    <option value="Option1">Option 1</option>
    <option value="Option2">Option 2</option>
    <option value="Option3">Option 3</option>
    <option value="Option4">Option 4</option>
    </select>

For questions, comments, or just feel like chatting, contact us at social@softlayer.com.

-Cassandra

September 24, 2014

HTML5 – Back to Basics with a Strong Foundation Pt. 1

If you guys have read any of my other blogs, I’m sure you’ll notice a pattern: rather than discussing opinions or news of new technologies, more often than not, I like to write more in the form of tutorials and hands-on exercises that demonstrate either fundamentals or new tips and tricks that I have learned.

In this blog, I’d like to discuss HTML5. I know, I know, it’s not exactly a subject that’s brand new. However, with as many HTML5 implementations as there are out there, and throughout many discussions, I’ve realized that many of the most talented Web developers have had to return to the basics of HTML5 features and techniques in order to redesign projects the same way they developed them.

Simply put: If we forget what we’ve done and scripted for over two decades with previous HTML versions and return to the basics, we can re-learn a new foundation that is sure to make us stronger developers and smarter engineers.

I. Declaration of Independence … or at least a declaration you don’t have to spend hours memorizing!

One of the most raved about features of HTML5 (and yet one of the simplest new features) is the new Doctype. How many of you had to Google the standard Doctype every single time you started a new project? Or perhaps you kept the tag in a code bin for easy copy/pasting? Well, no more!

The old (4 and below) way:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC “=//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN”
http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd>

Of course the actual strict/transitional or html/xhtml would vary depending on your page, but they pretty much worked the same way.

The new HTML5 way:

<!DOCTYPE html>

Done. I know it seems like such a simple thing, but returning to the foundation of what we learned so many years ago and re-learning them in the new HTML5 way will not only strengthen our sites, but it will also build a brand new foundation of flexibility and efficiency. Technology evolves at such a rapid pace that if we don’t keep up, we’re going to be left chasing the wagon of the future.

II. Editable content WITHOUT JavaScript!

HTML5 has added so many advanced features that our need for jQuery can be cut by nearly a third (depending on our requirements of course), which in turn greatly reduces the overhead of the browser’s need to process a ton of jQuery functions. If we utilize just a few of HTML5’s awesome new jQuery-like features, we can speed up our site and keep our .js scripts smaller!

Just for giggles (if you’re not familiar with HTML5’s editable content), give this a try:

<!DOCTYPE html>
 <html>
<head>
    <title>SLayer’s Awesome List</title>
</head>
<body>
    <h1> SLayer’s 5 Most Awesome Bloggers </h1>
        <ul contenteditable=”true”>
            <li>Steve Kinman</li>
            <li>Kevin Hazard</li>
            <li>Gary Kinman</li>
            <li>Matthew Herring</li>
            <li>Mark Quigley</li>
        </ul>
</body>
</html>

Put that into an .html file, and open it up in your favorite browser. You’ll see what should look like this:

A simple list of course. In the years of your career I’m sure you’ve made tens of thousands of these. What’s cool about this list, if you’re not familiar with all of HTML5’s neat little tricks, is that this list is editable. Go ahead and try clicking on the list item and replace the names; even add your own name!

As you can see, I didn’t have the heart to remove any of our most frequent bloggers, so I just appended my name to Mark Quigley (of course, that’s not my true SoftLayer Blog ranking, but one day soon … it shall be!)
This feature may not save the user’s edits, but if you add in some nifty HTML5 storage abilities (local or session), you could have yourself a pretty robust application!

III. Beautiful placeholders to hold a place for my heart.

One of my biggest gripes every time I’d either design or program a user interface (registration, account functionality) was the fact that I would have to integrate a jQuery function just to add a little bit of extra help with the text boxes. Placeholders never worked as they should. Sometimes we just didn’t have enough real estate on the page for the amount of instruction as we needed, which meant another placeholder maker for jQuery.

HTML5 now comes equipped with beautiful support for placeholder text (well, I suppose it depends on your POV on designing/developing forms. If you do it as much as I do, the new placeholders are the holy grail of usable forms!). A very simple preview of what HTML form life was like before HTML5 (without the jQuery function to add text to just one input box):

The fact is: Sometimes we don’t always have the real estate that we would like to provide the user enough instructions to clarify what needs to be done!

This simple form could end up being very confusing for the user. It’s so simple, yet there are several ways to enter a phone number, and depending on the backend, it may only accept one format.

Let’s add a placeholder to that textbox and clear things up:

<input placeholder="(555) 555-5555" type="text" name="phone" id="phone" />

Just by adding the simple placeholder attribute, we have now cleared up exactly what format we need the phone number! Now let’s have a look:

It’s funny how a simple, light-colored demonstration of acceptable input can really beautify a form and increase usability. With the placeholder attribute in place in this example, I’m not even sure it’s necessary to have the instruction text on the right, as we can clearly see we need 10 digits, with parenthesis and dashes.

Well my friends, looking at the word count of this document, it looks like this blog is coming to a close, and I’ve only gone over three of my favorite foundational features of HTML5, so you know what that means … Part 2!

-Cassandra

September 16, 2014

CSS3 Tips and Tricks – Generated Content Without jQuery

If you guys have read any of my past blogs, you know how much I LOVE jQuery, but every good developer knows that if there’s an easier or more efficient way of doing something: DO IT. With all the new developments with CSS3, HTML5, etc. etc., sometimes we have to get back to basics to relearn how to do things more efficiently, so here it goes!

Nearly every website has some form of 2.0/dynamic/generated content nowadays, and if your site doesn’t… well, it probably should catch up! I’ll show you how with some new CSS tricks and how it can reduce a lot of overhead of including the entire jQuery library (which would save you approximately 84kb per page load, assuming you have no other asynchronous/client side functionality you need).

I’ll start off with an easy example, since I know most of you take these examples and let your creativity run wild for your own projects. (Note to self: start a “Code Gone Wild” series.)

Usually this is the part where I say “First, let’s include the jQuery library as always.” Not this time, let’s break the rules!

FIRST, start off your document like any other (with the basic structure, set your DOCTYPE appropriately, i.e. strict vs transitional):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>

Wow, you can already tell this generated content’s going to be a TON easier than using jQuery (for those of you whom aren’t already jQuery fans).

Now let’s add in a div there; every time we hover over that div, we’re going to display our generated content with CSS. Inside of our div, we’re going to place a simple span, like so:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
     <div class=”slisawesome”>
          <span data-title="Hello Cassandra!">What’s my name?</span>
     </div>
</body>
</html>

As you can see, the span content contains a simple question and the data-title attribute contains the answer to that question.

Now let’s just make this div a little bit prettier before we get into the fancy stuff.

Add some style to the <head> section of our document:

<style>
     .slisawesome  {
          /* Will TOTALLY be making another blog about the cool CSS gradients soon */
          background:linear-gradient(to bottom, #8dd2d9 , #58c0c7);
          padding: 20px;  /* give the box some room to breathe */
          width: 125px;  /* give it a fixed width since we know how wide it should be  */
          margin: 100px auto;  /* move it away from the top of the screen AND center it */
          border: 1px solid black;  /* this is just a little border */
          position: relative;  /* this is to help with our generated content positioning */
     }
</style>

Now you should have something that looks like this:

This is good; this is what you should have. Now let’s make the magic happen and add the rest of our CSS3:

<style>
     .slisawesome  {
          /* Will TOTALLY be making another blog about the cool CSS gradients soon */
          background:linear-gradient(to bottom, #8dd2d9 , #58c0c7);
          padding: 20px;  /* give the box some room to breathe */
          width: 125px;  /* give it a fixed width since we know how wide it should be  */
          margin: 100px auto;  /* move it away from the top of the screen AND center it */
          border: 1px solid black;  /* this is just a little border */
          position: relative;  /* this is to help with our generated content positioning */
     }
     .slisawesome span::before {
          content:attr(data-title); /* assigning the data-title attribute value to the content */
          opacity: 0; /* hiding data-title until we hover over it */
          position: absolute; /* positioning our data-title content */
          margin-top: 50px; /* putting more space between our question and answer */
 
          /* Fancy transitions for our data-title when we hover over our question */
          /* which I’m TOTALLY going to write another blog for ;) If you guys want, of course */
          -webkit-transition:opacity 0.4s; /* determines the speed of the transition */
          transition:opacity 0.4s; /* determines the speed of the transition */
     }
</style>

Now, right now, your page should still look like this:

That’s okay! We still have ONE more step to go:

<style>
     .slisawesome  {
          /* Will TOTALLY be making another blog about the cool CSS gradients soon */
          background:linear-gradient(to bottom, #8dd2d9 , #58c0c7);
          padding: 20px;  /* give the box some room to breathe */
          width: 125px;  /* give it a fixed width since we know how wide it should be  */
          margin: 100px auto;  /* move it away from the top of the screen AND center it */
          border: 1px solid black;  /* this is just a little border */
          position: relative;  /* this is to help with our generated content positioning */
     }
     .slisawesome span::before {
          content:attr(data-title); /* assigning the data-title attribute value to the content */
          opacity: 0; /* hiding data-title until we hover over it */
          position: absolute; /* positioning our data-title content */
          margin-top: 50px; /* putting more space between our question and answer */
 
          /* Fancy transitions for our data-title when we hover over our question */
          /* which I’m TOTALLY going to write another blog for ;) If you guys want, of course */
          -webkit-transition:opacity 0.4s; /* determines the speed of the transition */
          transition:opacity 0.4s; /* determines the speed of the transition */
     }
     /* Drum Roll --------- Here’s our hover magic */
     .slisawesome span:hover::before{
          opacity:1;
     }
     /* Okay… that was a little anticlimactic… losing cool points */
</style>

Despite my anticlimactic adding of “the magic,” we just added a :hover that will show full opacity when we hover, so refresh your page and try it out! You should see something like this when you hover over THE QUESTION:

Of course you could REALLY start getting fancy with this by adding some php variables for the logged in user, or perhaps make it dynamic to location, time, etc. The possibilities are endless, so go… go and expand on this awesome generated content technique!

-Cassandra

June 3, 2014

My 5 Favorite Sublime Text 2 Plugins

I can’t believe that is was only a mere year ago since I learned of Sublime Text 2. I know, I know … where have I been? What kind of developer was I that I didn’t even know of Sublime Text? I’ll take the criticism, as I can honestly say it has been the best text editor I have ever used.

It’s extremely fast. I rarely wait for saves, uploads, or syntax highlighting, it keeps up with everything I do and allows me to develop directly from the keyboard. I hardly ever reach for my mouse!

It looks awesome. It has kind of retro-look for those developers who remember coding purely from the terminal or DOS. It really brings back memories.

It can be extended. Need some extra functionality that doesn’t come out-of-the-box? Sublime Text 2 has a range of available plugins that you can install to enhance your capabilities with this awesome text editor. In this blog, I’ll cover my top five favorite plugins of all time, what they do, and why they’re great!

1. BracketHighlighter

Many people believe that bracket highlighting should be a ready-made helper for developers of all languages. I agree on this point, however, at least Sublime Text 2 provides a plugin for this. It’s a very simple addition; it allows you to see if your opening brackets have an accompanying closing bracket. Many developers will tell you stories of these large and complex programs that consumed much of their time as they searched for one simple error … only to find that it was just a missing closing bracket.

In addition, it highlights opening and closing tags and quotes, for those of you who do a lot of HTML/XHTML, both bracket and tag settings are customizable.

For more details on the plugin check out the BracketHighlighter GitHub page.

2. DocBlockr

This is a neat plugin that speeds up and simplifies documentation. It supports PHP, Javascript, Java, Action Script, Objective C, C, C++, and Coffee Script.

By typing this:

/** (Press Enter)

The plugin automatically returns this:

/**
*
*/

Boom, the quickest way to document that I’ve ever seen.

In order to document your functions, just put it in your comment:

/** (Press Enter)
function myFunction(var1, var2) { }

And, it'll become:

/**
*[myFunction description]
* @param {[type]} var1 [description]
* @param {[type]} var2 [description]
* @param {[type]}
*/

function myFunction (var1, var2) { }

When you want to do variable documentation, the structure is similar:

/** (Press Enter)
myVar = 10

The plugin will fill out the documentation block like this:

/**
*[myVar description]
* @type {Number}
*/

Tell me that this isn’t nifty! If you want to try it out or just get a closer look at this plugin, head here.

3. Emmet (previously known as Zen Coding)

Unfortunately, I encountered some oddities when I tried to install Emmet with SublimeLinter, so I decided to disable the Linter in favor of Emmet to give it a spin. I absolutely love Emmet.

It provides a much more efficient way to code by providing what they call “abbreviations.” For example, if I want to create a div with an unordered list and one bullet point in it, Emmet lets me save myself a lot of time ... I can type this into Sublime:

div>ul>li

And press Control+E, and my code automatically turns into this:

<div>
    <ul>
        <li></li>
    </ul>
</div>

If I need to add multiple <li> tags, I can easily replicate them with a small addition:

div>ul>li*3

When I hit Control+E, voila! The unordered list structure is quickly generated:

<div>
    <ul>
        <li></li> 
        <li></li>
        <li></li>
    </ul>
</div>

That's just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Emmet's functionality, and if you’re as impressed as I am, you should check out their site: http://docs.emmet.io/

4. SFTP

I think the title of the plugin says it all. It allows you to directly connect to your server and sync projects and files just by saving. You will never have to edit a file in a text editor, open your FTP client and upload the file again. Now, you can do it directly from Sublime Text 2.

When used in conjunction with Projects, you’ll find that you can easily save hours of time spent on remote uploading. By far, SFTP for Sublime Projects is one of the most essential plugins you’ll need for any project!

5. SideBarEnhancements

This is a small plugin that makes minor adjustments to the Files and Folders sidebar, providing a more intuitive interface. Though this doesn’t add much functionality, it can definitely speed things up. Take a look at the plugin on the SideBarEnhancements GitHub page

I hope this list of Sublime Text 2 plugins will enhance your capabilities and ease up your processes, as it has done for me. Give them a try and let me know what you think. Also, if you have a different favorite plugin, I’d love to hear about it.

-Cassandra

September 20, 2013

Building a Mobile App with jQuery Mobile: The Foundation

Based on conversations I've had in the past, at least half of web developers I've met have admitted to cracking open an Objective-C book at some point in their careers with high hopes of learning mobile development ... After all, who wouldn't want to create "the next big thing" for a market growing so phenomenally every year? I count myself among that majority: I've been steadily learning Objective-C over the past year, dedicating a bit of time every day, and I feel like I still lack skill-set required to create an original, complex application. Wouldn't it be great if we web developers could finally get our shot in the App Store without having to unlearn and relearn the particulars of coding a mobile application?

Luckily for us: There is!

The rock stars over at jQuery have created a framework called jQuery Mobile that allows developers to create cross-platform, responsive applications on a HTML5-based jQuery foundation. The framework allows for touch and mouse event support, so you're able to publish across multiple platforms, including iOS, Android, Blackberry, Kindle, Nook and on and on and on. If you're able to create web applications with jQuery, you can now create an awesome cross-platform app. All you have to do is create an app as if it was a dynamic HTML5 web page, and jQuery takes care of the rest.

Let's go through a real-world example to show this functionality in action. The first thing we need to do is fill in the <head> content with all of our necessary jQuery libraries:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>SoftLayer Hello World!</title>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.3.2/jquery.mobile-1.3.2.min.css" />
    <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.9.1.min.js"></script>
    <script src="http://code.jquery.com/mobile/1.3.2/jquery.mobile-1.3.2.min.js"></script>
</head>

Now let's create a framework for our simplistic app in the <body> section of our page:

<body>
    <div data-role="page">
        <div data-role="header">
            <h1>My App!</h1>
        </div>
 
        <div data-role="content">
            <p>This is my application! Pretty cool, huh?</p>
        </div>
 
        <div data-role="footer">
            <h1>Bottom Footer</h1>
        </div>
 
    </div>
</body>
</html>

Even novice web developers should recognize the structure above. You have a header, content and a footer just as you would in a regular web page, but we're letting jQuery apply some "native-like" styling to those sections with the data-role attributes. This is what our simple app looks like so far: jQuery Mobile App Screenshot #1

While it's not very fancy (yet), you see that the style is well suited to the iPhone I'm using to show it off. Let's spice it up a bit and add a navigation bar. Since we want the navigation to be a part of the header section of our app, let's add an unordered list there:

<div data-role="header">
    <h1>My App!</h1>
        <div data-role="navbar">
            <ul>
                <li><a href="#home" class="ui-btn-active" data-icon="home" data-theme="b">Home</a></li>
                <li><a href="#softlayer_cool_news" data-icon="grid" data-theme="b">SL Cool News!</a></li>
                <li><a href="#softlayer_cool_stuff" data-icon="star" data-theme="b">SL Cool Stuff!</a></li>
            </ul>
        </div>
    </div>

You'll notice again that it's not much different from regular HTML. We've created a navbar div with an unordered list of menu items we'd like to add to the header: Home, SL Cool News and SL Cool Stuff. Notice in the anchor tag of each that there's an attribute called data-icon which defines which graphical icon we want to represent the navigation item. Let's have a peek at what it looks like now: jQuery Mobile App Screenshot #2

Our app isn't doing a whole lot yet, but you can see from our screenshot that the pieces are starting to come together nicely. Because we're developing our mobile app as an HTML5 app first, we're able to make quick changes and see those changes in real time from our phone's browser. Once we get the functionality we want to into our app, we can use a tool such as PhoneGap or Cordova to package our app into a ready-to-use standalone iPhone app (provided you're enrolled in the Apple Development Program, of course), or we can leave the app as-is for a very nifty mobile browser application.

In my next few blogs, I plan to expand on this topic by showing you some of the amazingly easy (and impressive) functionality available in jQuery Mobile. In the meantime, go grab a copy of jQuery Mobile and start playing around with it!

-Cassandra

August 29, 2013

HTML5 Tips and Tricks - Local Storage

As I'm sure you've heard by now: HTML5 is all the rage. People are creating amazing games with canvases, media interactivity with embeds and mobile/response sites with viewports. We've come a long way since 1990s iFrames! In this blog, I wanted to introduce you to an HTML5 tool that you might find useful: Local Web Storage — quite possibly the holy grail of web development!

In the past (and still most of the present), web sites store information about a surfer's preferences/choices via cookies. With that information, a site can be customized for a specific user, and that customization makes for a much better user experience. For example, you might select your preferred language when you first visit a website, and when you return, you won't have to make that selection again. You see similar functionality at work when you select themes/colors on a site or when you enlist help from one of those "remember me" checkboxes next to where you log into an account. The functionality that cookies enable is extremely valuable, but it's often inefficient.

You might be aware of some of the drawbacks to using cookies (such as size limitation (4KB) and privacy issues with unencrypted cookies), but I believe the most significant problem with cookies is overhead. Even if you limit your site to just a few small cookies per user, as your userbase grows into the thousands and tens of thousands, you'll notice that you're transferring a LOT data of over HTTP (and those bandwidth bills might start adding up). Cookies are stored on the user's computer, so every time that user visits your domain, the browser is transferring cookies to your server with every HTTP request. The file size for each of these transactions is tiny, but at scale, it can feel like death by a thousand cuts.

Enter HTML5 and local storage.

Rather than having to transmit data (cookies) to a remote web server, HTML5 allows a site to store information within the client web browser. The information you need to customize your user's experience doesn't have to travel from the user's hard drive to your server because the customization is stored in (and applied by) the user's browser. And because data in local storage isn't sent with every HTTP request like it is with cookies, the capacity of local storage is a whopping 5MB per domain (though I wouldn't recommend pushing that limit).

Let's check out how easy it is to use HTML5's local storage with JavaScript:

<script type="text/javascript">
    localStorage.setItem('preferredLanguage', 'EN');
</script>

Boom! We just set our first variable. Once that variable has been set in local storage for a given user, that user can close his or her browser and return to see the correct variable still selected when we retrieve it on our site:

<script type="text/javascript">
    localStorage.getItem('preferredLanguage');
</script>

All of the lead-up in this post, you're probably surprised by the simplicity of the actual coding, but that's one of the biggest reasons HTML local storage is such an amazing tool to use. We set our user's preferred language in local storage and retrieved it from local storage with a few simple lines. If want to set an "expiration" for a given variable in local storage the way you would for a cookie, you can script in an expiration variable that removes an entry when you say the time's up:

<script type="text/javascript">
    localStorage.removeItem('preferredLanguage');
</script>

If we stopped here, you'd have a solid fundamental understanding of how HTML5 local storage works, but I want to take you beyond the standard functionality of local storage. You see, local storage is intended primarily to store only strings, so if we wanted to store an object, we'd be out of luck ... until we realized that developers can find workarounds for everything!

Using some handy JSON, we can stringify and parse any object we want to store as local storage:

<script type="text/javascript">
    var user = {};
    user.name = 'CWolff';
    user.job = 'Software Engineer II';
    user.rating = 'Awesome';
 
    //If we were to stop here, the entry would only read as [object Object] when we try to retrieve it, so we stringify with JSON!
    localStorage.setItem('user', JSON.stringify(user));
 
    //Retrieve the object and assign it to a variable
    var getVar = JSON.parse(localStorage.getItem('user'));
 
    //We now have our object in a variable that we can play with, let's try it out
    alert(getVar.name);
    alert(getVar.job);
    alert(getVar.rating);
</script>

If you guys have read any of my other blogs, you know that I tend to write several blogs in a series before I move on to the next big topic, and this won't be an exception. Local storage is just the tip of the iceberg of what HTML5 can do, so buckle up and get ready to learn more about the crazy features and functionality of this next-generation language.

Try local storage for yourself ... And save yourself from the major headache of trying to figure out where all of your bandwidth is going!

-Cassandra

April 29, 2013

Web Development - Installing mod_security with OWASP

You want to secure your web application, but you don't know where to start. A number of open-source resources and modules exist, but that variety is more intimidating than it is liberating. If you're going to take the time to implement application security, you don't want to put your eggs in the wrong basket, so you wind up suffering from analysis paralysis as you compare all of the options. You want a powerful, flexible security solution that isn't overly complex, so to save you the headache of making the decision, I'll make it for you: Start with mod_security and OWASP.

ModSecurity (mod_security) is an open-source Apache module that acts as a web application firewall. It is used to help protect your server (and websites) from several methods of attack, most common being brute force. You can think of mod_security as an invisible layer that separates users and the content on your server, quietly monitoring HTTP traffic and other interactions. It's easy to understand and simple to implement.

The challenge is that without some advanced configuration, mod_security isn't very functional, and that advanced configuration can get complex pretty quickly. You need to determine and set additional rules so that mod_security knows how to respond when approached with a potential threat. That's where Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) comes in. You can think of the OWASP as an enhanced core ruleset that the mod_security module will follow to prevent attacks on your server.

The process of getting started with mod_security and OWASP might seem like a lot of work, but it's actually quite simple. Let's look at the installation and configuration process in a CentOS environment. First, we want to install the dependencies that mod_security needs:

## Install the GCC compiler and mod_security dependencies ##
$ sudo yum install gcc make
$ sudo yum install libxml2 libxml2-devel httpd-devel pcre-devel curl-devel

Now that we have the dependencies in place, let's install mod_security. Unfortunately, there is no yum for mod_security because it is not a maintained package, so you'll have to install it directly from the source:

## Get mod_security from its source ##
$ cd /usr/src
$ git clone https://github.com/SpiderLabs/ModSecurity.git

Now that we have mod_security on our server, we'll install it:

## Install mod_security ##
$ cd ModSecurity
$ ./configure
$ make install

And we'll copy over the default mod_security configuration file into the necessary Apache directory:

## Copy configuration file ##
$ cp modsecurity.conf-recommended /etc/httpd/conf.d/modsecurity.conf

We've got mod_security installed now, so we need to tell Apache about it ... It's no use having mod_security installed if our server doesn't know it's supposed to be using it:

## Apache configuration for mod_security ##
$ vi /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

We'll need to load our Apache config file to include our dependencies (BEFORE the mod_security module) and the mod_security file module itself:

## Load dependencies ##
LoadFile /usr/lib/libxml2.so
LoadFile /usr/lib/liblua5.1.so
## Load mod_security ##
LoadModule security2_module modules/mod_security2.so

We'll save our configuration changes and restart Apache:

## Restart Apache! ##
$ sudo /etc/init.d/httpd restart

As I mentioned at the top of this post, our installation of mod_security is good, but we want to enhance our ruleset with the help of OWASP. If you've made it this far, you won't have a problem following a similar process to install OWASP:

## OWASP ##
$ cd /etc/httpd/
$ git clone https://github.com/SpiderLabs/owasp-modsecurity-crs.git
$ mv owasp-modsecurity-crs modsecurity-crs

Just like with mod_security, we'll set up our configuration file:

## OWASP configuration file ##
$ cd modsecurity-crs
$ cp modsecurity_crs_10_setup.conf.example modsecurity_crs_10_config.conf

Now we have mod_security and the OWASP core ruleset ready to go! The last step we need to take is to update the Apache config file to set up our basic ruleset:

## Apache configuration ##
$ vi /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

We'll add an IfModule and point it to our new OWASP rule set at the end of the file:

<IfModule security2_module>
    Include modsecurity-crs/modsecurity_crs_10_config.conf
    Include modsecurity-crs/base_rules/*.conf
</IfModule>

And to complete the installation, we save the config file and restart Apache:

## Restart Apache! ##
$ sudo /etc/init.d/httpd restart

And we've got mod_security installed with the OWASP core ruleset! With this default installation, we're leveraging the rules the OWASP open source community has come up with, and we have the flexibility to tweak and enhance those rules as our needs dictate. If you have any questions about this installation or you have any other technical blog topics you'd like to hear from us about, please let us know!

-Cassandra

March 7, 2013

Script Clip: HTML5 Audio Player with jQuery Controls

HTML5 and jQuery provide mind-blowing functionality. Projects that would have taken hours of development and hundreds of lines of code a few years ago can now be completed in about the time it'll take you to read this paragraph. If you wanted to add your own audio player on a web page in the past, what would it have involved? Complicated elements? Flash (*shudders*)? It was so complicated that most developers just linked to the audio file, and the user just downloaded the file to play it locally. With HTML5, an embedded, cross-browser audio player can be added to a page with five lines of code, and if you want to get really fancy, you can easily use jQuery to add some custom controls.

If you've read any of my previous blogs, you know that I love when I find little code snippets that make life as a web developer easier. My go-to tools in that pursuit are HTML5 and jQuery, so when I came across this audio player, I knew I had to share. There are some great jQuery plugins to play music files on a web page, but they can be major overkill for a simple application if you have to include comprehensive controls and themes. Sometimes you just want something simple without all of that overhead:

Oooh... Ahhh...

That song — Pop Bounce by SoftLayer's very own Chris Interrante — is written in five simple lines of HTML5 code:

<audio style="width:550px; margin: 0 auto; display:block;" controls>
  <source src="http://cdn.softlayer.com/innerlayer/Interrante-PopBounce.ogg" type="audio/ogg">
  <source src="http://cdn.softlayer.com/innerlayer/Interrante-PopBounce.mp3" type="audio/mpeg">
Your browser does not support the audio element.
</audio>

If IE 9+, Chrome 6+, Firefox 3.6+, Safari 5+ and Opera 10+ would all agree on supported file formats for the <audio> tag, the code snippet would be even smaller. I completely geek out over it every time I look at it and remember the days of yore. As you can see, the HTML5 application has some simple default controls: Play, Pause, Scan to Time, etc. As a developers, I couldn't help but look for a to spice it up a little ... What if we want to fire an event when the user plays, pauses, stops or takes any other action with the audio file? jQuery!

Make sure your jQuery include is in the <head> of your page:

<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.2/jquery.min.js"></script>

Now let's use jQuery to script separate "Play" and "Pause" links ... And let's have those links fire off an alert when they are pressed:

$(document).ready(function(){
  $("#play-button").click(function(){
   $("#audioplayer")[0].play();
   alert('You have played the audio file!');
  })    
 
  $("#pause-button").click(function(){
   $("#audioplayer")[0].pause();
   alert('You have paused the audio file!');
  })    
})

With that script in the <head> as well, the HTML on our page will look like this:

<div class=:"audioplayer">
  <audio id="audioplayer" name="audioplayer" controls loop>
    <source src="http://cdn.softlayer.com/innerlayer/Interrante-PopBounce.ogg" type="audio/ogg">
    <source src="http://cdn.softlayer.com/innerlayer/Interrante-PopBounce.mp3" type="audio/mpeg">
  Your browser does not support the audio element.
  </audio>
 
  <a id="play-button" href="#">Play!</a>
  <a id="pause-button" href="#">Pause!</a>
</div>

Want proof that it works that simply? Boom.

You can theme it any way you like; you can add icons instead of the text ... The world is your oyster. The bonus is that you're using one of the lightest media players on the Internet! If you decide to get brave (or just more awesome), you can explore additional features. You're using jQuery, so your possibilities are nearly limitless. If you want to implement a "Stop" feature (which returns the audio back to the beginning when "Stop" is pressed), you can get creative:

$("#stop-button").click(function(){
    $("#audioplayer")[0].currentTime = 0; // return the audio file back to the beginning
}

If you want to include some volume controls, those can be added in a snap as well:

$("#volumeUp").click(function(){
    $("#audioplayer")[0].volume +=0.1;
}
 
$("#volumeDown").click(function(){
    $("#audioplayer")[0].volume -=0.1;
}

Try it out and let me know what you think. Your homework is to come up with some unique audio player functionality and share it here!

-Cassandra

February 14, 2013

Tips and Tricks – Building a jQuery Plugin (Part 2)

jQuery plugins don't have to be complicated to create. If you've stumbled upon this blog in pursuit of a guide to show you how to make a jQuery plugin, you might not believe me ... It seems like there's a chasm between the "haves" of jQuery plugin developers and the "have nots" of future jQuery developers, and there aren't very many bridges to get from one side to the other. In Part 1 of our "Building a jQuery Plugin" series, we broke down how to build the basic structure of a plugin, and in this installment, we'll be adding some usable functionality to our plugin.

Let's start with the jQuery code block we created in Part 1:

(function($) {
    $.fn.slPlugin = function(options) {
            var defaults = {
                myVar: "This is", // this will be the default value of this var
                anotherVar: "our awesome",
                coolVar: "plugin!",
            };
            var options = $.extend(defaults, options);
            this.each(function() {
                ourString = myVar + " " + anotherVar + " " + coolVar;
            });
            return ourString;
    };
}) (jQuery);

We want our plugin to do a little more than return, "This is our awesome plugin!" so let's come up with some functionality to build. For this exercise, let's create a simple plugin that allows truncates a blob of text to a specified length while providing the user an option show/hide the rest of the text. Since the most common character length limitation on the Internet these days is Twitter's 140 characters, we'll use that mark in our example.

Taking what we know about the basic jQuery plugin structure, let's create the foundation for our new plugin — slPlugin2:

(function($) {
    $.fn.slPlugin2 = function(options) {
 
        var defaults = {
            length: 140,
            moreLink: "read more",
            lessLink: "collapse",
            trailingText: "..."
        };
 
        var options = $.extend(defaults, options);
    };
})(jQuery);

As you can see, we've established four default variables:

  • length: The length of the paragraph we want before we truncate the rest.
  • moreLength: What we append to the paragraph when it is truncated. This will be the link the user clicks to expand the rest of the text.
  • lessLink: What we append to the paragraph when it is expanded. This will be the link the user clicks to collapse the rest of the text.
  • trailingText: The typical ellipses to append to the truncation.

In our jQuery plugin example from Part 1, we started our function with this.each(function() {, and for this example, we're going to add a return for this to maintain chainability. By doing so, we're able to manipulate the segment with methods. For example, if we started our function with this.each(function() {, we'd call it with this line:

$('#ourParagraph').slPlugin2();

If we start the function with return this.each(function() {, we have the freedom to add further manipulation:

$('#ourParagraph').slPlugin2().bind();

With such a simple change, we're able to add method calls to make one massive dynamic function.

Let's flesh out the actual function a little more. We'll add a substantial bit of code in this step, but you should be able to follow along with the changes via the comments:

(function($) {
    $.fn.slPlugin2 = function(options) {
 
        var defaults = {
            length: 140, 
            moreLink: "read more",
            lessLink: "collapse",
            trailingText: "..."
        };
 
        var options = $.extend(defaults, options);
 
        // return this keyword for chainability
        return this.each(function() {
            var ourText = $(this);  // the element we want to manipulate
            var ourHtml = ourText.html(); //get the contents of ourText!
            // let's check if the contents are longer than we want
            if (ourHtml.length > options.length) {
                var truncSpot = ourHtml.indexOf(' ', options.length); // the location of the first space (so we don't truncate mid-word) where we will end our truncation.
 
   // make sure to ignore the first space IF the text starts with a space
   if (truncSpot != -1){
       // the part of the text that will not be truncated, starting from the beginning
       var firstText = ourHtml.substring(0, truncSpot);
 
       // the part of the text that will be truncated, minus the trailing space
       var secondText = ourHtml.substring(truncSpot, ourHtml.legnth -1);
                }
            }
        })
    };
})(jQuery);

Are you still with us? I know it seems like a lot to take in, but each piece is very straightforward. The firstText is the chunk of text that will be shown: The first 140 characters (or whatever length you define). The secondText is what will be truncated. We have two blobs of text, and now we need to make them work together:

(function($) {
    $.fn.slPlugin2 = function(options) {
 
        var defaults = {
            length: 140, 
            moreLink: "read more",
            lessLink: "read less",
            trailingText: "..."
        };
 
        var options = $.extend(defaults, options);
 
        // return this keyword for chainability
        return this.each(function() {
            var ourText = $(this);  // the element we want to manipulate
            var ourHtml = ourText.html(); //get the contents of ourText!
            // let's check if the contents are longer than we want
            if (ourHtml.length > options.length) {
                var truncSpot = ourHtml.indexOf(' ', options.length); // the location of the first space (so we don't truncate mid-word) where we will end our truncation.
 
   // make sure to ignore the first space IF the text starts with a space
   if (truncSpot != -1){
       // the part of the text that will not be truncated, starting from the beginning
       var firstText = ourHtml.substring(0, truncSpot);
 
       // the part of the text that will be truncated, minus the trailing space
       var secondText = ourHtml.substring(truncSpot, ourHtml.legnth -1);
 
       // perform our truncation on our container ourText, which is technically more of a "rewrite" of our paragraph, to our liking so we can modify how we please. It's basically saying: display the first blob then add our trailing text, then add our truncated part wrapped in span tags (to further modify)
       ourText.html(firstText + options.trailingText + '<span class="slPlugin2">' + secondText + '</span>');
 
       // but wait! The secondText isn't supposed to show until the user clicks "read more", right? Right! Hide it using the span tags we wrapped it in above.
       ourText.find('.slPlugin2').css("display", "none");
                }
            }
        })
    };
})(jQuery);

Our function now truncates text to the specified length, and we can call it from our page simply:

<script src="jquery.min.js"></script>
<script src="jquery.slPlugin2.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {  
    $('#slText').slPlugin2();  
});
</script>

Out of all the ways to truncate text via jQuery, this has to be my favorite. It's feature-rich while still being fairly easy to understand. As you might have noticed, we haven't touched on the "read more" and "read less" links or the expanding/collapsing animations yet, but we'll be covering those in Part 3 of this series. Between now and when Part 3 is published, I challenge you to think up how you'd add those features to this plugin as homework.

-Cassandra

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