Author Archive: J.R. Lehmann

July 11, 2016

Certified Ubuntu Images Available in SoftLayer

In partnership with Canonical, we are excited to announce today that SoftLayer is now an Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud Partner for Ubuntu guest images.  

For clients, this means you can harness the value of deploying Ubuntu certified images in SoftLayer. The value to our clients includes: 

  • Running Ubuntu on SoftLayer’s high performance and customizable virtual and bare metal server offerings
  • Ubuntu cloud guest image updates with enablement, publication, development, and maintenance across all data centers. Customers will have the latest Ubuntu features, compliance accreditations and security updates
  • Quality assurance ensures that customers enjoy one of the highest-quality Ubuntu experiences, including some of the fastest security patching of any Linux provider
  • Archive mirrors for faster updates retrieval for Ubuntu images
  • The opportunity to engage with Canonical for enterprise-grade support on Ubuntu cloud guest images, and use Landscape, Canonical’s award-winning system monitoring tool

In a continued effort to enhance client experience, SoftLayer’s partnership with Canonical assures clients as they look to accelerate transformation on Ubuntu workloads with a consistent SoftLayer experience.

“Canonical has a broad partnership with IBM with Ubuntu images already available on LinuxOne, Power and Z Systems,” said Anand Krishnan, EVP, Cloud, Canonical. “By signing this new public cloud partnership with SoftLayer we have made Ubuntu images available for its customers.”

Canonical continually maintains, tests, and updates certified Ubuntu images, making the latest versions available through Softlayer within minutes of their official release by Canonical. This means that you will always have the latest version of Certified Ubuntu images.

Please visit these pages for more information:

Find an Ubuntu Partner

Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud

About Canonical

Canonical is the company behind Ubuntu, the leading OS for container, cloud, scale-out and hyperscale computing. Sixty-five percent of large-scale OpenStack deployments are on Ubuntu, using both KVM and the pure-container LXD hypervisor for the world’s fastest private clouds. Canonical provides enterprise support and services for commercial users of Ubuntu.

Canonical leads the development of Juju, the model-driven operations system, and MAAS (Metal-as-a-Service), which creates a physical server cloud and IPAM for amazing data center operational efficiency. Canonical is a privately held company.

July 7, 2016

New SoftLayer Accounts Now With IBMid Authentication

Hi, and welcome to SoftLayer. We’re so happy you are joining our cloud family. For our new customers, if you haven’t heard the news, SoftLayer was acquired by IBM in 2013. With this comes transition, including the setup of an IBMid.

But this is a great news for our new customers because not only does this ID allow you to manage your SoftLayer account, but you can also access Bluemix-based services and resources by using a single sign-on. Although separate accounts, you can link your Bluemix and SoftLayer accounts. This is just a step toward providing you with an optimal IBM Cloud user experience.

Here’s what you need to know.

SoftLayer account login screen

Customers who created SoftLayer accounts after July 6, 2016 will need to follow the “IBMid Account Login” link at the bottom of the customer portal login page to use their IBMid to log in. Customers will be redirected to their Customer Portal Dashboard after their IBMid has been successfully authenticated.

Sign in to IBM

Two-Factor Authentication for IBMid Users

Customers with Two-Factor Authentication enabled will be asked to provide security code as shown below.

Two-Factor Authentication

How do I know if my account is using SoftLayer IDs or IBMids?

An IBMid is always an email address (e.g., joe@company.com). User accounts created after July 6, 2016 must follow the “IBMid Account Login” link and use their IBMid credentials, provided during their SoftLayer user creation process, to log into the SoftLayer customer portal.

If users do not know when their accounts were created and they’re using an email address to log in, they should attempt to use the SoftLayer login form first. In the future, these forms will be combined into a single one in order to simplify this experience.

Use of VPN Access and API Key

An IBMid cannot be used for VPN access. If a SoftLayer user has been granted VPN access, he or she can connect to VPN using the VPN username and password found on the customer’s profile page in the SoftLayer customer portal.

An IBMid cannot be used for API calls. If a SoftLayer user has been granted an API Key, that customer can access his or her API username and key on the profile page in the SoftLayer customer portal.

Access to VPN and API credentials has not changed for current users.

Edit User Profile

A Note to Our Current Customers

For the time being, existing accounts created prior to July 6, 2016 will continue to use the SoftLayer username and password authentication. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact your sales representative.

For more information, check out these KnowledgeLayer articles:

Reset the SoftLayer Customer Portal Password

Add a New User to a Customer Portal Account

Bluemix FAQ

Remove a User from the Customer Portal

Log in as a New User

Set Up Your Account

Customer Portal FAQ

Edit a User Profile

If you are experiencing issues with IBMid login, please email identsrv@us.ibm.com with the subject, "Problem Logging In With IBMid."

June 1, 2016

For a Limited Time Only: Free POWER8 Servers

So maybe you’ve heard that POWER8 servers are now available from SoftLayer. But did you know you can try them for free?

Yep. That’s right. For. Free.

Even better: We’re excited to extend this offer to our new and existing customers. For a limited time only, our customers can take up to $2,238 off their entire order using promo code FREEPOWER8.

That’s a nice round number. (Not!)

I bet you’re wondering how we came up with that number. Well, $2,238 gets you the biggest, baddest POWER8-est machine we offer: POWER8 C812L-SSD, loaded with 10 cores, 3.49GHz, 512GB RAM, and 2x960GB SSDs. Of course, if you don’t need that much POWER (pun intended), we offer three other configs that might fit your lifestyle a little bit better. Check them out here.

 

For a limited time only, our customers can take up to $2,238 off their entire POWER8 order.

 

Oh, and the not-so-fine print (as if I have to say it, but legal told me I had to, so…): This offer is good only on POWER8 servers. (Duh!) The offer expires September 30, 2016. You’re limited to one promo code use per customer only. Customers take up to $2,238 off the first order in the first billing cycle of your POWER8 server (which means new customers should order at the beginning of the month to take full advantage of the offer; if you wait till the 20th of the month, you only get it for 10 days—11 depending on whether the month has 30 or 31 days, but I digress. And for existing customers, your current billing anniversary will dictate the length of time you can use POWER8). POWER8 is currently only rocking out in DAL09. This offer cannot be combined with any other offers, and SLIC accounts are not eligible.

For more information on this offer, please check out the FAQ or contact a sales representative. POWER up!

August 12, 2015

Network Performance 101: What is latency, and why does it matter?

We’ve all been there. Waiting for a web page to load can be so frustrating that we end up just closing out. You might ask yourself, “Hey, I have high-speed Internet. Why is this happening to me?” Well, there are a lot of factors outside your control that … control page loads. And whether you have an online store, run big data solutions, or have your employees set up on a network accessing files around the world, you never want to hear that your data, consumer products, information, or otherwise, is keeping you from a sale or slowing down employee productivity because of slow data transfer.

So why are some pages so much slower to load than others?
It could be that poorly written code or large images are slowing the load on the backend, but slow page loads can also be caused by network latency. This might sound elementary, but data is not just floating out there in some non-physical Internet space. In reality, data is stored on hard drives … somewhere. Network connectivity provides a path for that data to travel to end users around the world, and that connectivity can vary significantly—depending on how far it’s going, how many times the data has to hop between service providers, how much bandwidth is available along the way, the other data traveling across the same path, and a number of other variables.

The measurement of how quickly data travels between two connected points is called network latency. Network latency is an expression of the amount of time it takes a packet of data to get from one place to another.

Understanding Network Latency
Theoretically, data can travel at the speed of light across optical fiber network cables, but in practice, data typically travels slower than light due to the variables we referenced in the previous section. If a network connection doesn’t have any available bandwidth capacity, data might temporarily queue up to wait for its turn to travel across the line. If a service provider’s network doesn’t route a network path optimally, data could be sent hundreds or thousands of miles away from the destination in the process of routing to the destination. These kinds of delays and detours lead to higher network latency, which lead to slower page loads and download speeds.

We express network latency in milliseconds (that’s 1,000 milliseconds per second), and while a few thousandths of a second may not mean much to us as we’re living our daily lives, those milliseconds are often the deciding factors for whether we stay on a webpage or give up and try another site. As consumers of high-speed Internet, we like what we like, and we want what we want when we want it. In the financial sector, milliseconds can mean billions of dollars in gains or losses from trade transactions on a day-to-day basis.

Logical conclusion: Everyone wants the lowest network latency to the greatest number of users.

Common Approaches to Minimize Network Latency
If our shared goal is to minimize latency for our data, the most common approaches to addressing network latency involve limiting the number of potential variables that can impact the speed of data’s movement. While we don’t have complete control over how our data travels across the Internet, we can do a few things to keep our network latency in line:

  • Distribute data around the world: Users in different locations can pull data from a location that’s geographically close to them. Because the data is closer to the users, it is handed off fewer times, it has a shorter distance to travel, and inefficient routing is less likely to cause a significant performance impact.
  • Provision servers with high-capacity network ports: Huge volumes of data can travel to and from the server every second. If packets are delayed due to fully saturated ports, milliseconds of time pass, pages load slower, download speeds drop, and users get unhappy.
  • Understand how your providers route traffic: When you know how your data is transferred to users around the world, you can make better decisions about where you host your data.

How SoftLayer Minimizes Network Latency
To minimize latency, we took a unique approach to building our network. All of our data centers are connected to network points of presence. All of our network points of presence are connected to each other via our global backbone network. And by maintaining our own global backbone network, our network operations team is able to control network paths and data handoffs much more granularly than if we relied on other providers to move data between geographies.

SoftLayer Private Network

For example, if a user in Berlin wants to watch a cat video hosted on a SoftLayer server in Dallas, the packets of data that make up that cat video will travel across our backbone network (which is exclusively used by SoftLayer traffic) to Frankfurt, where the packets would be handed off to one of our peering or transit public network partners to get to the user in Berlin.

Without a global backbone network, the packets would be handed off to a peering or transit public network provider in Dallas, and that provider would route the packets across its network and/or hand the packets off to another provider at a network hop, and the packets would bounce their way to Germany. It’s entirely possible that the packets could get from Dallas to Berlin with the same network latency with or without the global backbone network, but without the global backbone network, there are a lot more variables.

In addition to building a global backbone network, we also segment public, private, and management traffic onto different network ports so that different types of traffic can be transferred without interfering with each other.

SoftLayer Private Network

But at the end of the day, all of that network planning and forethought doesn’t amount to a hill of beans if you can’t see the results for yourself. That’s why we put speed tests on our website so you can check out our network yourself (for more on speed tests, check out this blog post).

TL;DR: Network Latency
Your users want your data as quickly as you can get it to them. The time it takes for your data to get to them across the Internet is called network latency. The more control you (or your provider) have over your data’s network path, the more consistent (and lower) your network latency will be.

Stay tuned. Next month we will be discussing Network Performance 101: Security, where we’ll discuss all things cloud security—including answering your burning questions: Can other people see or access my data in a public cloud? Is my data more prone to hackers? And, what safeguards do SoftLayer have in place to protect data?

-JRL

April 29, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1, No. 11

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

Q1
A recent study deemed SoftLayer the top-mentioned hosting provider for cloud services among 50 percent of IT decision makers. This news comes on the heels of IBM’s first quarter earnings report, announcing a 75 percent increase in cloud revenue (with yearly revenue at $7.7 billion). Forbes explains IBM’s rise to power over the competition in “Move Over Amazon, IBM Can Also Claim Top Spot In Cloud Services.” Additionally, Mark Jones, SoftLayer’s chief technology officer, gave details to CRN on how IBM expects to stay on top of the cloud competition by offering pricing benefits over its market-leading rivals.

SoftLayer opens data center in The Netherlands…again.
Last week, in an effort to continue delivering on our promise to expand data centers worldwide, SoftLayer opened a second data center in the Netherlands—just outside Amsterdam in Almere. “The new facility demonstrates the demand and success IBM Cloud is having at delivering high-value services right to the doorstep of our clients,” said James Comfort, IBM cloud services general manager.

Building Applications in the Cloud with SoftLayer
For those who enjoy broadcast over print, our lead technology evangelist, Phil Jackson, sat down with Jacob Goldstein of Wireframes to discuss how to choose the right servers for your needs. Listen to the podcast.

-JRL

Categories: 
April 20, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1, No. 10

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

The Battle for Global Market Share
Warmer weather must be around the corner—or it could just be the cloud industry heating up. How will cloud providers profit as more and more providers push for world domination? The Economist predicts an industry change as prices drop.

IBM Partners with TI on Secure APIs for IoT
Allow me to translate: the International Business Machines Corporation is partnering with Texas Instruments to secure application program interfaces with the help of the Internet of Things. Through its collaboration with TI, IBM will create a Secure Registry Service that will provide trust and authentication practices and protocol across the value chain–from silicon embedded in devices and products to businesses and homes.

(Join the conversation at #IoTNow or #IoT.)

The U.S. Army Goes Hybrid
The U.S. Army is hoping to see a 50 percent cost savings by utilizing IBM cloud services and products. Like many customers, the Army opted for a hybrid solution for security, flexibility, and ease of scale. Read more about what IBM Cloud and SoftLayer are doing for the U.S Army and other U.S. government departments.

The Only Constant is Change
Or so said Heraclitus of Ephesus. And to keep up with the changing times, IBM has reinvented itself over and over again to stay relevant and successful. This interesting read discusses why big corporations just aren't what they used to be, what major factors have transformed the IT industry over the last couple of decades, and how IBM has been leading the change, time-after-time.

-JRL

Categories: 
April 10, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1, No. 9

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

Welcome to the Masters
If you’re not practicing your swing this weekend, you’re watching the Masters. Over the next couple of days, professional golfers will seek their shot at landing the coveted Green Jacket. And while everyone might be watching the leaderboard, IBM will be hard at work in what they are calling the “bunker,” located in a small green building at the Augusta National Golf Club.

What does IBM have to do with the Masters? Everything.

Read how IBM, backed by the power of the SoftLayer cloud, is making the Masters website virtually uncrashable.

And for those that can’t line the greens to watch your favorite player, IBM is utilizing the lasers the Golf Club has placed around the course to track the ball as it flies from hole-to-hole. Learn more about the golf-ball tracking technology here.

Open Happiness
In a move to streamline tech operations and cut costs, Coca-Cola Amatil is partnering with IBM Cloud to move some of its platforms to SoftLayer data centers in Sydney and Melbourne—a deal sure to open happiness.

"The move to SoftLayer will provide us with a game-changing level of flexibility, resiliency and reliability to ramp up and down capacity as needed. It will also remove the need for large expenditure on IT infrastructure." - Barry Simpson, CIO, Coca-Cola Amatil

Read more about the new CCA cloud environment and the five-year, multimillion-dollar deal.

-JRL

Categories: 
April 1, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1 No. 8

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

Sunny Skies for IBM Cloud and The Weather Company
IBM made big headlines on Tuesday when it announced they would team up with The Weather Company boasting “100 percent chance of smarter business forecasts.”

Bloomberg sits down with Bob Picciano, IBM Analytics Senior VP, and David Kenny, The Weather Company CEO to discuss what makes this different than other companies that have analyzed the weather in the past. Using Watson Analytics and the Internet of Things, the partnership will transform business decision-making based on weather behavior. Read how IBM’s $3 billion investment in the Internet of Things will collect weather data from 100,000 weather stations around the world and turn it into meaningful data for business owners.

Indian Startups Choose SoftLayer
According to the National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM), India has the world’s third largest and the fastest-growing startup ecosystem. Like many SoftLayer startup customers, Goldstar Healthcare, Vtiger, Clematix, Ecoziee Marketing utilize the SoftLayer cloud infrastructure platform to “begin on a small scale and then expand rapidly to meet workload demands without having to worry about large investments in infrastructure development.”

New SoftLayer Storage Offerings
Last week, SoftLayer announced the launch of block storage and file storage complete with Endurance- and Performance-class tiers. The media was fast to report the new offerings that provide customers more choice, flexibility, and control for their storage needs and workloads.

“ … SoftLayer’s focus on tailored capacity and performance needs coincides with the trend in the cloud market of customizing technology based on different application requirements.”– IBM Splits SoftLayer Cloud Storage Into Endurance, Performance Tiers

“In the age of the cloud, the relationship between cloud storage capacity and I/O performance has officially become divorced.” – IBM Falls Into Cloud Storage Pricing Line

Pick your favorite online tech media and read all about it: SiliconANGLE, Computer Weekly, Data Center Knowledge, CRN, V3, Cloud Computing Intelligence, Storage Networking Solutions UK, and DCS Europe.

#IBMandTwitter
There are more than half a billion tweets posted to Twitter every day. IBM is teaming up with Twitter to turn those “tweets into insights for more than 100 organizations around the world.” Leon Sun of The Motley Fool takes a closer look at what the deal means to IBM and Twitter.

“Twitter provides a powerful new lens through which to look at the world. This partnership, drawing on IBM’s leading cloud-based analytics platform, will help clients enrich business decisions with an entirely new class of data. This is the latest example of how IBM is reimaging work.” – Ginni Romety, IBM Chairman, President and CEO

-JRL

Categories: 
March 6, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1 No. 7: the IBM InterConnect Edition

Last week, an estimated 21,000 IBMers, SLayers, customers and partners from around the world flooded Las Vegas, Nev. to attend the first-ever IBM InterConnect. This new conference combined three popular IBM conferences (Impact, Innovate and Pulse) into a single, premier cloud and mobile techno-topia.

What our engineers and developers did in Las Vegas after conference hours might have stayed in Las Vegas, but IBM’s InterConnect hits and announcements didn’t. Here’s a recap:

Speed to Market Wins the Cloud Computing Race
Everyone likes to go fast, and the new senior vice president for IBM Cloud, Robert LeBlanc, likes to go super-fast. “What I’m focusing on is speed,” LeBlanc says.

In this blink-and-the-market-changes world, time-to-market determines the winners and losers in cloud computing. Part of LeBlanc’s strategy is opening new SoftLayer datacenters. If you haven’t heard the news, SoftLayer will be launching Sydney and Montreal data centers in the next 30 days — with more coming soon. Stay tuned for more locations.

Read more on how LeBlanc plans to win the cloud business race.

Cloudy skies on the horizon—that’s a good thing!
Our CEO, Ginni Rometty, announced a $4 billion investment on cloud services (shared with the data analytics and mobile businesses). She’s hoping that the investment will spur $40 billion a year in revenue come 2018.

Signs of the investment could be seen as execs at InterConnect announced new hybrid services coming in 2015, including enterprise containers. [What’s a container? Read our blog post.]

In fact, hybrid was a big theme at InterConnect. “We are going to make all those clouds act like one,” says Angel Diaz, vice president of IBM cloud technologies. IBM cloud (powered by SoftLayer) will be a one-stop shop: a cloud superstore with a smorgasbord of aaS offerings.

It looks like it’ll be an exciting ride for IBM over the next couple of years. Make sure to keep up with the headlines for more announcements in the coming months.

-JRL

Categories: 
February 9, 2015

Eradicating Ebola with Grid Computing Linked by the SoftLayer Network

On September 30, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control confirmed the first case of Ebola in the U.S. Although not uncommon to hear of outbreaks in other parts of the world, this first case in the U.S. just happened to be in our own headquarters’ backyard—Dallas.

IBM jumped at the opportunity to help find a cure or at least a treatment for the virus, not necessarily because SoftLayer happened to be in the “storm’s eye,” but as Stanley S. Litow, IBM’s vice president of Corporate Citizenship and president of the IBM International Foundation said, “It is a privilege to partner with The Scripps Research Institute to advance the process of identifying an Ebola cure.”

But finding a cure is difficult. The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), an independent, not-for-profit organization has been researching Ebola for the past 11 years. Dr. Erica Ollmann Saphire, says, “We’ve solved the structures that explain what the surface of Ebola virus looks like, how it attaches to and drives itself into cells, and how it behaves like a wolf in sheep’s clothing in hiding itself from an immune response.” [Read more on the research.] Finding a cure could take hundreds of years of computing time—not manpower. And now that more people are more mobile, it is vital to find a cure since the disease can easily spread over vast distances and quickly escalate into an epidemic.

The Technology Behind The Science

IBM’s philanthropic division, Corporate Citizenship, created World Community Grid in 2004 as a way for individuals to donate their spare processing power from their personal computers, tablets, and mobile phones when not in use. The World Community Grid is utilizing grid computing for researchers, like TSRI, to accelerate their research by breaking the research into millions of little tasks. When a device is not in use, it downloads one of these tasks, calculates, and then sends it back to the researchers when complete. Instead of utilizing one super computer, researchers harness the power of a virtual super computer. This collection of computing power is all connected via the SoftLayer network.

After the Ebola outbreak last fall, the number of infections increased steadily until last week. Officials link the increase to emergency funds for containing the disease in West Africa starting to run out. We may not see Ebola cured overnight, but thanks to grid computing and the efforts of scientists and individuals donating their idle computing power resources, hopefully treatments and vaccinations for this disease and many other diseases can be developed sooner.

- JRL

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