Author Archive: Mac Devine

September 12, 2013

"Cloud First" or "Mobile First" - Which Development Strategy Comes First?

Company XYZ knows that the majority of its revenue will come from recurring subscriptions to its new SaaS service. To generate visibility and awareness of the SaaS offering, XYZ needs to develop a mobile presence to reach the offering's potential audience. Should XYZ focus on building a mobile presence first (since its timing is most critical), or should it prioritize the completion of the cloud service first (since its importance is most critical)? Do both have to be delivered simultaneously?

It's the theoretical equivalent of the "Which came first: The chicken or the egg?" causality dilemma for many technology companies today.

Several IBM customers have asked me recently about whether the implementation of a "cloud first" strategy or a "mobile first" strategy is most important, and it's a fantastic question. They know that cloud and mobile are not mutually exclusive, but their limited development resources demand that some sort of prioritization be in place. However, should this prioritization be done based on importance or urgency?

IBM MobileFirst

The answer is what you'd expect: It depends! If a company's cloud offering consists solely of back-end services (i.e. no requirement or desire to execute natively on a mobile device), then a cloud-first strategy is clearly needed, right? A mobile presence would only be effective in drawing customers to the back-end services if they are in place and work well. However, what if the cloud offering is targeting only mobile users? Not focusing on the mobile-first user experience could sabotage a great set of back-end services.

As this simple example illustrated, prioritizing one development strategy at the expense of the other strategy can have devastating consequences. In this "Is there an app for that?" generation, a lack of predictable responsiveness for improved quality of service and/or quality of experience can drive your customers to your competitors who are only a click away. Continuous delivery is an essential element of both "cloud first and "mobile first" development. The ability to get feedback quickly from users for new services (and more importantly incorporate that feedback quickly) allows a company to re-shape a service to turn existing users into advocates for the service as well as other adjacent or tiered services. "Cloud first" developers need a cloud service provider that can provide continuous delivery of predictable and superior compute, storage and network services that can be optimized for the type of workload and can adapt to changes in scale requirements. "Mobile first" developers need a mobile application development platform that can ensure the quality of the application's mobile user experience while allowing the mobile application to also leverage back-end services. To accommodate both types of developers, IBM established two "centers of gravity" to allow our customers to strike the right balance between their "cloud first" and "mobile first" development.

It should come as no surprise that the cornerstone of IBM's cloud first offering is SoftLayer. SoftLayer's APIs to its infrastructure services allow companies to optimize their application services based on the needs of application, and the SoftLayer network also optimizes delivery of the application services to the consumer of the service regardless of the location or the type of client access.

For developers looking to prioritize the delivery of services on mobile devices, we centered our MobileFirst initiative on Worklight. Worklight balances the native mobile application experience and integration with back-end services to streamline the development process for "mobile first" companies.

We are actively working on the convergence of our IBM Cloud First and Mobile First strategies via optimized integration of SoftLayer and Worklight services. IBM customers from small businesses through large enterprises will then be able to view "cloud first and "mobile first" as two sides of the same development strategy coin.

-Mac

Mac Devine is an IBM distinguished engineer, director of cloud innovation and CTO, IBM Cloud Services Division. Follow him on Twitter: @mac_devine.

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