Author Archive: Mathijs Dubbe

January 8, 2016

A guide to Direct Link connectivity

So you’ve got your infrastructure running on SoftLayer, but you find yourself wishing for a more direct way to connect your on-premises or co-located infrastructure to your SoftLayer cloud infrastructure—with higher bandwidth and lower latency. And you also think the Internet just isn’t good enough when we’re talking VPN tunnels and private networking connectivity. Does that sound like you?

What are my options?

SoftLayer offers three Direct Link products that are specifically for customers looking for the most efficient connection to their SoftLayer private network. A Direct Link enables you to connect to the SoftLayer private network backbone with low latency speeds—up to 10Gbps using fiber cross-connect patches directly into the SoftLayer private network. A Direct Link is used to connect to a SoftLayer private network within the same geographical location of the physical cross-connect. (An add-on is available that enables you to connect to any of your SoftLayer private networks on a global scale.)

Direct Link Network Service Provider


The Direct Link NSP option allows you to create a cross-connect using single-mode fiber from one of our PoP locations onto the SoftLayer private backbone. You’ll have a Network Service Provider of your own preference that provides you with connectivity from your on-prem location to the SoftLayer PoP. This could be an “in-facility” cross-connect to your own equipment, MPLS, Metro WAN, or Fiber provider. The Direct Link NSP is the top-tier connectivity option we offer pertaining to private networking connectivity onto the SoftLayer private backbone.

Direct Link Cloud Exchange Provider


A cloud exchange provider is a carrier/network provider that is already connected to SoftLayer using multi-tenant, high capacity links. This allows you to purchase a virtual circuit at this provider and a Direct Link cloud exchange link at SoftLayer at reduced costs, because the physical connectivity from SoftLayer to the cloud exchange provider is already in place and shared amongst other customers.

Direct Link Colocation Provider


If your gear is co-located in a cabinet purchased via SoftLayer that’s in the same facility near or adjacent to a SoftLayer data center or POD, this option would work for you. Similar to the NSP option, this is a single-mode fiber but there’s no need to connect to a SoftLayer PoP location first—you can connect directly from your cabinet to the relevant SoftLayer data center.

How do you communicate over a Direct Link?

The SoftLayer Direct Link service is a routed Layer 3 service. Routing options are: routing using a SoftLayer assigned subnet, NAT, GRE or IPsec tunnels, VRF, and BGP.

Routing
We directly bind the 172.x.x.x IP block to your remote hosts that need to communicate with your SoftLayer infrastructure. You can either renumber your existing hosts on the remote networks or bind these as secondary IPs and setup appropriate static routes on the host. You can then use the 172.x.x.x IP space to communicate with the 10.x.x.x IP's of your SoftLayer hosts as necessary. Routing via BGP is optional.

NAT
With NAT, SoftLayer will assign you a block of IPs from the 172.16.0.0/12 IP block to NAT into a device from your remote network to prevent IP conflicts with the SoftLayer 10.x.x.x IP range(s) assigned.

GRE / IPsec Tunneling
You can create a GRE or IPSEC tunnel between the remote network and your infrastructure here at SoftLayer. This allows you to use whatever IP space you want on the SoftLayer side and route back across the tunnel to the remote network. With that being said, this is a configuration that will have to be managed and supported by you, independent of SoftLayer. Furthermore, this configuration could break connectivity to the SoftLayer services network if you use a 10.x.x.x block that SoftLayer has in use for services. This solution will also require that each host needing connectivity to the SoftLayer services network and the remote network have two IPs assigned (one from the SL 10.x.x.x block, and one from the remote network block) and static routes setup on the host to ensure traffic is routed appropriately. You will not be able to assign whatever IP space you want directly on the SoftLayer hosts (BYOIP) and have it routable on the SoftLayer network inherently. The only way to do this is as outlined above and is not supported by SoftLayer.

VRF
You can opt-in to utilizing a VRF (Virtual Routing and Forwarding) instance. This allows the customer to either utilize their own remote IP addresses or overlap with a large majority of the SoftLayer infrastructure; however, you must be aware that if you utilize the 10.x.x.x network you still cannot overlap with your hosts within SoftLayer nor within the SoftLayer services network (10.0.0.0/14 and 10.200.0.0/14). You will not be able to set any of the following for your remote prefixes: 10.0.0.0/14, 10.200.0.0/14, 10.198.0.0/15, 169.254.0.0/16, 224.0.0.0/4, and any IP ranges assigned to your VLANs on the SoftLayer platform. When choosing the VRF option, the ability to use SoftLayer VPN services for management of your servers will no longer be possible. Routing via BGP is optional.

Example:

FAQ

Will I need to provide my own cross-connect?
Yes, you will need to order your own cross-connect at your data center of choice—to be connected to the SoftLayer switch port described in the LOA (Letter of Authorization) provided.

What kind of cross-connects are supported?
We strictly use Single Mode Fiber (SMF). We do not accept MMF or Copper.

What is the default size of the remote 172.16.*.* subnet assigned?
Unless otherwise requested, Direct Link customers will be assigned a /24 (256 IPs) subnet.

Which IP block has been reserved for SoftLayer servers on the backend?
We've allocated the entire 10.0.0.0/8 block for use on the SL private network. Specifically, 10.0.0.0/14 has been ear-marked for services. Here’s the full list of service subnets: http://knowledgelayer.softlayer.com/faqs/196#154

Which IP block has been reserved for point-to-point SoftLayer XCR to customer router?
10.254.0.0/16 range. We normally allocate either a /30 or /31 subnet for the point-to-point connection (between our XCR and their equipment on the other end of the Direct Link).

Does Direct Link support jumbo frames?
Yes, just like the private SoftLayer network Direct Link can support up to MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit) 9000-size jumbo frames.

Pricing and locations

A list of available locations and pricing can be found at www.softlayer.com/direct-link.

-Mathijs Dubbe

November 4, 2015

Shared, scalable, and resilient storage without SAN

Storage area networks (SAN) are used most often in the enterprise world. In many enterprises, you will see racks filled with these large storage arrays. They are mainly used to provide a centralized storage platform with limited scalability. They require special training to operate, are expensive to purchase, support, or expand, and if those devices fail, there is big trouble.

Some people might say SAN devices are a necessary evil. But are they really necessary? Aren’t there alternatives?

Most startups nowadays are running their services on commodity hardware, with smart software to distribute their content across server farms globally. Current, well established, and successful companies that run websites or apps like Whatsapp, Facebook, or LinkedIn continue to operate pretty much the same way they started. They need the ability to scale and perform at unpredictable rates all around the world, so they use commodity hardware combined with smart software. These types of companies need the features that SAN storage offers them—but with more scalable, global resiliency, and without being centralized or having to buy expensive hardware. But how do they provide server access to the same data, and how do they avoid data loss?

The answer is actually quite simple, although its technology is quite sophisticated: distributed storage.

In a world where virtualization has become a standard for most companies, where even applications and networking are being virtualized, virtualization giant VMware answers this question with Virtual SAN. It effectively eliminates the need for SAN hardware in a VMware environment (and it will also be available for purchase from SoftLayer before the end of the year). Other similar distributed products are GlusterFS (also offered in our QuantaStor solution), Ceph, Microsoft Windows DFS, Hadoop HDFS, document-oriented databases like MongoDB, and many more.

Many solutions, however, vary in maturity. Object storage is a great example of a new type of storage that has come to market, which doesn’t require SAN devices. With SoftLayer, you can and may run them all.

When you have bare metal servers set up as hypervisors or application servers, it’s likely you have a lot of drive bays within those servers, mostly unused. Stuffing them with hard drives and allowing the software to distribute your data across multiple servers in multiple locations with two or three replicas will result in a big, safe, fast, and distributed storage platform. For such a platform, scaling it would be just adding more bare metal servers with even more hard drives and letting the software handle the rest.

Nowadays we are seeing more and more hardware solutions like SAN—or even networking—being replaced with smarter software on simpler and more affordable hardware. At SoftLayer, we offer month-to-month and hourly bare metal servers with up to 36 drive bays, potentially providing a lot of room for storage. With 10Gbps global connectivity options, we offer fast, low latency networking for syncing between servers and delivering data to the customer.

-Mathijs

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