Author Archive: Mary Hall

January 20, 2010

Hosting for Haiti

SoftLayer is joining the online project Hosting for Haiti in an effort to raise awareness and funding for the American Red Cross. The earthquakes in Haiti on January 12 and the resulting aftershocks have left the country devastated.

The American Red Cross is dedicated to providing emergency relief and recovery to help those affected by the disaster.

This project is a joint effort between hosting providers like ourselves. Peer1 Hosting, GoGrid, The Planet, ServInt, and Rackspace are all involved in helping with donations and spreading awareness. If you would like to get involved, follow the info link at http://hostingforhaiti.com/.

Follow on Twitter: @hostingforhaiti or use the hashtag #hostingforhaiti.

April 8, 2009

More “SLingo”: SLanket vs. Snuggie

I am not ashamed to say that I own both the Slanket and the Snuggie. I got the Snuggie as a gift last year, and I purchased the Slanket for myself a couple of months ago (only partly because of the cool SL name). The Slanket turned out to be a WAY better product. As I sat on the couch with my Slanket and my kitten Linux, I started drawing these hilarious and uncanny parallels between the Slanket and my company, SoftLayer. Once I got started, I just couldn’t stop:

  1. The Slanket is bigger, and thicker. The fabric of the Slanket is far more robust, and doesn’t start “pilling” immediately. It’s designed for constant and vigorous use, and will last me a very long time before wearing out.
  2. There are more buying options with the Slanket – they come in different sizes and many more colors (including a shade that’s *almost* SoftLayer Red), so there’s a Slanket for every need.
  3. The Slanket has a better name – Sleeves + Blanket = Slanket. I’m not likely to talk about my “Snuggie” to my peers, because … well, I’m not a 4-year old.
  4. While the Slanket is a bit more expensive, it is a far superior product. In the Blankets-With-Sleeves industry, you seem to get what you pay for.
  5. I used the Contact Us form on the Slanket website to talk to their SLales team, and got great, personalized service, and a discount! Btw, the owner’s email address is also available online, which shows that he is involved in the day to day operations, and wants to hear from you.

Does any of this sound familiar? These are the same things people love about SoftLayer. I am a very proud SLanket customer. A++ would buy again.

SLanket

July 20, 2008

SLales Quotas

It's usually unwise to place bets on what the SoftLayer Slales Team can and cannot sell. We will blow the quota out of the water every time.

But still, we like to place harmless wagers from time to time. Sure we have sales quotas every month, but sometimes our Management team likes to make it interesting by seeing how far beyond our goals we can get each month. May was the BEST sales “spiff” to date. George Karidis was unfortunately on the losing end this month, and had to shave the 3-bars logo into the back of his head. He wore it proudly to customer/vendor meetings & dinners until they grew out.

To be fair, the SoftLayer Sales team has a remarkably easy time making our numbers - it's almost effortless to meet or exceed our server quota every month when you're are standing behind the best product on the market, and working among the most knowledgeable and enthusiastic sales team in the industry.

Go Team SoftLayer!

-Mary

Categories: 
March 26, 2008

.llli

It looks like nonsense to you, but it means OH SO MUCH more to the members of SLales.

".llli" is the international SoftLayer Sales symbol for *high five*, invoked when major deals are closed, or when hilarious jokes are made over the cube walls.
Here’s how it works: the period is the thumb, the three lower case Ls are the index, middle and ring finger, and the lower case I is the pinky. See it?

SoftLayer Sales are the big mouths of the company - we are louder, more boisterous and more interactive with our teammates than most of the other office departments, so high-fiving is pretty much a standard mode of communication. (I don’t think it hurts that pretty much everyone on the sales team was in a frat/sorority in college.)

Not everyone loves the high-five, though. When there’s a .llli session going on in the sales area, most others steer clear. When a potential high-fiver (read: Douglas Jackson) is hired, part of the training documentation includes a list of C-titles and VPs who you should not attempt to high five. Doug seems to specialize in getting people to high-five, knowing that they don’t want to.

Just another peek into the world in which we live. Come on sales chat sometime and give us a high five. Or make it a double:
illl. .llli

-Mary

December 4, 2007

Team SoftLayer

When we first opened our doors, Jeaves and Josh used to split 24-hour shifts in the DC to provide 24x7 support coverage, and there was a “napping couch” in the office for the occasional overnight work shift up in Plano. Most of us had a toothbrush if not a change of clothes in our desk drawer, and a fun Friday night entailed sitting around a whiteboard talking numbers, and coming up with new ideas for the datacenter.

Team SoftLayer is much much larger now, but the spirit is much the same. This picture is from a swingin’ SL party we had a few Thursdays ago, where the office got together to label power cables for the new Seattle DC. There are members of Dev, Sales, Accounting, Marketing, & Management here working together. It makes me so proud.

July 18, 2007

There is no "I" in "Sales"

I've been working with Amanda, Daniel, Miller and Laude for a long time in a shared sales team environment. Until recently, it had never occurred to me how bizarre it is that five such independent and competitive sales people are able to drive the SoftLayer Sales Machine almost 24x7x365 as a single seamless entity.

How do we do this?

First and foremost, we get along with each other - The value of this statement only really hits home if you understand how much time we spend with one another. Splitting an almost 24x7 work-week between 5 people means that we all work a *lot* of hours. Overlapping schedules, late nights, the almost constant blackberry messaging back and forth. If I didn't love these guys, this job would be impossible.

Great management - (Clearly, a shameless effort to suck up to the boss ^_^) Lance and Steven both have very hands-off management styles. They both give us "Just enough rope to hang [our]selves", meaning that we get to do a whole lot on our own. This is why SL Sales is the most technically savvy and aware in the dedi server industry. It also means that we trust and lean heavily on one another to make sure we stay that way, and of course, don't hang ourselves.

We share everything, good and bad - Think: commission checks as well as schedules. Sharing EVERYTHING drives us in a couple of different ways. Since our paychecks depend on how well we do as a whole, each of us is sure to give 110% at all times, because what's better than a 110% paycheck if you can get it, right? Along the same lines, none of us wants to be singled out as the weakest link in the chain – competition holds us up and keeps us on our toes.

Finally, we all have different strengths and weaknesses - If you combine us all together, you have the perfect mixture of unfailing politeness & cool (Amanda), masterful jocularity (Daniel), world-renowned strength under pressure (Miller), finely-tuned professionalism (Laude), and my own studied protocol & firmness. So there's not a customer in the world who can't get along with at least one of us.

SL Sales (or “SLales” as Lance likes to call us) really works here – I can't imagine it any other way.

-Mary

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