Business Posts

October 22, 2016

The future of SoftLayer is bright. And it’s Bluemix.

Since the founding of SoftLayer in May of 2005, our motto has been “Innovate or Die.” Over the past decade, our business has grown exponentially and evolved to meet the needs of our customers and seize opportunities in the marketplace. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Today, we’re excited to share the next big step in SoftLayer’s evolution as part of the IBM Cloud portfolio: IBM Bluemix is integrating SoftLayer products and services into its vast catalog of infrastructure, platform, and application services!

The SoftLayer products, services, tools, systems, and support you know and love will become a cornerstone of a unified Bluemix cloud experience that delivers the performance, flexibility, and consistency of SoftLayer infrastructure alongside the extensive catalog of cloud resources that include IBM Watson services, development runtimes, containers, database services, and more.

But enough of the fluff. What does this mean to you as a SoftLayer customer?

In the coming days, weeks, and months, you’ll start SoftLayer integrated more tightly into the Bluemix cloud platform, and with this integration, we’re bringing all of our cloud platform offerings under the Bluemix brand.

The most important thing to remember about this transition is that all of the SoftLayer systems, products, services, and support you know and love will remain in place as fundamental building blocks upon which the broader Bluemix catalog will be built.

Bluemix will be consistent with your SoftLayer experience:

  • For the next few months, all SoftLayer offerings will be available on both SoftLayer.com and IBM.com/Bluemix—which means you can order identical products and services on either site, and they’ll be deployed in the same data centers and managed in the same systems.
  • You still have access the your SoftLayer control portal to manage your cloud infrastructure environment.
  • The support teams for all platforms will remain exactly the same.

While our team places a high priority on preserving the SoftLayer customer experience, the opportunities available as a result of this integration into Bluemix are what we’re most excited about:

  • The SoftLayer control portal has been integrated into the Bluemix console to allow for a single dashboard to manage infrastructure and cloud services.
  • By linking your SoftLayer account to a Bluemix account, you’ll receive one invoice for all of your infrastructure and services.
  • The full catalog of Bluemix products and services is available for you to integrate into your own apps and systems, letting you do what you do better and more efficiently.

You may have seen a service notification about the availability of IBMid single sign-on authentication for your SoftLayer account, and we’re happy to announce that customers have the ability to link SoftLayer and Bluemix accounts as well.

So, what can you do now?

Well, you can keep doing what you’ve always done—we were intentional about making that possible. But if you want to take a more proactive approach to learning about what the future of SoftLayer looks like in Bluemix, we recommend heading over to the Bluemix homepage so you can see how our infrastructure offerings—like bare metal servers, virtual servers, cloud storage, security, and network products—are integrated into Bluemix.

And while you’re there, you can learn about some of the cool things you can do with Bluemix, like:

  • Optimize campaigns in real-time based on customer reactions using Watson Personality Insights.
  • Improve outcomes with Watson Alchemy API and Retrieve and Rank paired with high performance bare metal servers.
  • Securely store, analyze, and process your big data using database services with Apache Spark.

As we transition SoftLayer fully into Bluemix, please follow us over to the IBM Bluemix Blog to keep up with the latest announcements, news, and product information about your Bluemix infrastructure.

Innovate or Die.

-Kevin

August 4, 2016

Magic Quadrants, Performance Metrics & Water Cooler Discussions: Evaluating Cloud IaaS

When you make decisions about extending your infrastructure footprint into the cloud, you do so very intentionally. You hunt down analyst reports, ask peers for recommendations, and seek out quantitative research to compare the seemingly endless array of cloud-based options. But how can you be sure that you’re getting the most relevant information for your business case? Bias exists and definitions matter. So each perspective is really just a single input in the decision-making process.

The best process for evaluating any cloud solution involves four simple steps:

  1. Understand what you need.
  2. Understand what you’re buying.
  3. Understand how you’ll use it.
  4. Test it yourself.

Understand What You Need

The first step in approaching cloud adoption is to understand the resources your business actually needs. Are you looking to supplement your on-premises infrastructure with raw compute and storage power? Do your developers just need runtimes and turnkey services? Would you prefer infrastructure-abstracted software functionality?

In the past, your answers to those questions may send you to three different cloud providers, but the times are changing. The lines between “Infrastructure as a Service,” “Platform as a Service,” and “Software as a Service” have blurred, and many cloud providers are delivering those offerings side-by-side. While SoftLayer cloud resources would be considered “infrastructure,” SoftLayer is only part of the broader IBM Cloud story.

Within the IBM Cloud portfolio, customers find IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS solutions to meet their unique workload demands. From an infrastructure perspective alone, IBM Cloud offers cloud servers and storage from SoftLayer; containers, databases, deployment, and monitoring tools within Bluemix; and turnkey OpenStack private cloud environments from Blue Box. We are integrating every component of the IBM Cloud portfolio into a seamless user experience so that when a customer needs to add cognitive capabilities or a private cloud or video services to their bare metal server infrastructure, the process is quick and easy.

Any evaluation of SoftLayer as a cloud provider would be shortsighted if it doesn’t take into account the full context of how IBM Cloud is bringing together multiple unique, highly differentiated offerings to provide a dynamic, full-featured portfolio of tools and services in the cloud. And as you determine what you need in the cloud, you should look for a provider that enables the same kind of cross-functional flexibility so that you don’t end up splintering your IT environment across multiple providers.

Understand What You’re Buying

Let’s assume that you’re primarily interested in deploying raw compute infrastructure in the cloud, since that’s SoftLayer’s primary focus. The seemingly simple first step in choosing the cloud infrastructure that best meets your needs is to define what “cloud infrastructure” actually means for your business.

Technology analyst firm Gartner defines cloud IaaS as “a standardized, highly automated offering, where compute resources, complemented by storage and networking capabilities, are owned by a service provider and offered to the customer on demand. The resources are scalable and elastic in near real time, and metered by use.” While that definition seems broad, its Magic Quadrant for Cloud Infrastructure as a Service explains that when cloud resources are provisioned in “near real time,” that means they must be deployed in minutes (not hours). To be considered “metered by use,” they must be charged by the minute or hour (rather than by the month).

Given Gartner’s interpretation of “real time” and the “by use” measurement, bare metal servers that are fully configured by the customer and provisioned into a cloud provider’s data center (usually in about two hours and billed by the month) aren’t classified as cloud infrastructure as a service. That distinction is important, because many customers looking to extend workloads into the cloud are more interested in the performance of the resources than they are in provisioning times, and bare metal servers deliver better, more consistent performance than their virtualized counterparts.

The performance angle is important. Many of cloud customers need servers capable of processing large, big data workloads (data mining, numerical and seismic analysis, processing and rendering 3D video, real-time social media analysis, etc.). These types of workloads generally consist of petabytes of data, and bare metal servers are better suited for running them—and options like adding GPU cards for high performance computing make them even more enticing. The fact is that most virtualized cloud servers that can be delivered in minutes or less are not capable of handling these types of demanding workloads at all, or at least not as well as, more powerful bare metal servers that are available in just a couple of hours.

In contrast to Gartner’s definition, other analysts support the inclusion of monthly bare metal servers in cloud infrastructure decisions. In “The Truth About Price-Performance,” Frost & Sullivan explains, “Bare metal servers provide the highest levels of raw ‘throughput’ for high-performance workloads, as well as flexibility to configure storage and network resources.” And Forrester Research published a full report to address the question, “Is bare metal really ‘cloud’?” The answer was, again, a resounding yes.

Using Gartner’s definition, the majority of SoftLayer’s cloud infrastructure as a service offerings are considered “noncloud,” so they are not considered or measured in evaluations like the Magic Quadrant for Cloud IaaS. And without the majority of our business represented, the interpretation of those results may be confusing.

In practice, customers actually choose SoftLayer because of the availability of the offerings that Gartner considers to be “noncloud.” For example, Clicktale, a SoftLayer client, explains, “SoftLayer gives us the flexibility we need for demanding workloads. The amount of data we process is enormous, but SoftLayer’s bare metal machines are the best out there and we have a high level of control over them—it’s like owning them ourselves.”  

Our unique cloud platform with full support of both bare metal servers and virtual servers delivers compute resources that better suit our customers’ workloads in the cloud. Whether or not you consider those resources “cloud” is up to you, but if you opt for a more limited definition, you’ll cut out a large, important segment of the cloud market.

Understand How You’ll Use It

Once you settle on a definition of what meets your workload’s needs in the cloud, it’s important to evaluate how a given cloud resource will actually be used. Many of the factors that go into this evaluation are actually supplementary to the resource itself. Is it accessible via API? How can you connect it to your on-premises infrastructure? Will the data and workloads hosted on these resources be delivered quickly and consistently when your customers or internal teams need them?

While some of these questions are relatively easy to answer, others are nuanced. For example, SoftLayer's data center footprint continues to expand around the world, but this seemingly pedestrian process of making servers available in a new facility or geography is only part of the story. Because every new SoftLayer data center is connected to a single global network backbone that streamlines and accelerates data transfer to, from, and between servers, as our data center footprint grows, our network performance improves to and from users in that geography to SoftLayer customer servers in every other data center around the world.

And what does that underlying network architecture mean in practice? Well, we’ve run public network performance tests that show consistent results between 35 percent to 700 percent faster network speeds when compared to other “leaders” in the cloud space. Most industry reports, including Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Cloud Infrastructure as a Service, fail to acknowledge the importance of network performance in their assessments of cloud resources, focusing instead on the features and functionality of a given offering on its own.

The underlying platform capabilities and network infrastructure that support a given cloud resource aren’t obvious when comparing the speeds and feeds of cloud server specifications. So as you evaluate a cloud provider, it’s important to look beyond “what’s in the box” to how cloud resources will actually perform, both on the server and between the server and your data’s users. And the best way to get an understanding of that performance is to run your own tests.

Test It Yourself

The process of choosing a cloud provider or adopting a specific cloud resource cannot be purely academic. The nature of cloud computing allows for on-demand deployment of resources for real-world testing at a low cost with no long-term commitments. Making a decision to go with a given cloud provider or resource based on what anyone says—be it Gartner’s MQ, Forrester, Frost & Sullivan, SoftLayer, or your nephew—could have huge implications on your business.

SoftLayer will continue working with third-party research firms to demonstrate how our cloud infrastructure delivers up to 440 percent better performance for the cost compared with our competitors, but those stats are meant to start a conversation, not end it.

We encourage prospective customers to try SoftLayer for free. You can do this by taking advantage of up to $500 in free cloud resources for a month. Put our servers and our underlying platform to the test. Then make your own assessments on the vision and execution of SoftLayer’s unique approach to cloud infrastructure as a service.

Start Building
July 11, 2016

Certified Ubuntu Images Available in SoftLayer

In partnership with Canonical, we are excited to announce today that SoftLayer is now an Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud Partner for Ubuntu guest images.  

For clients, this means you can harness the value of deploying Ubuntu certified images in SoftLayer. The value to our clients includes: 

  • Running Ubuntu on SoftLayer’s high performance and customizable virtual and bare metal server offerings
  • Ubuntu cloud guest image updates with enablement, publication, development, and maintenance across all data centers. Customers will have the latest Ubuntu features, compliance accreditations and security updates
  • Quality assurance ensures that customers enjoy one of the highest-quality Ubuntu experiences, including some of the fastest security patching of any Linux provider
  • Archive mirrors for faster updates retrieval for Ubuntu images
  • The opportunity to engage with Canonical for enterprise-grade support on Ubuntu cloud guest images, and use Landscape, Canonical’s award-winning system monitoring tool

In a continued effort to enhance client experience, SoftLayer’s partnership with Canonical assures clients as they look to accelerate transformation on Ubuntu workloads with a consistent SoftLayer experience.

“Canonical has a broad partnership with IBM with Ubuntu images already available on LinuxOne, Power and Z Systems,” said Anand Krishnan, EVP, Cloud, Canonical. “By signing this new public cloud partnership with SoftLayer we have made Ubuntu images available for its customers.”

Canonical continually maintains, tests, and updates certified Ubuntu images, making the latest versions available through Softlayer within minutes of their official release by Canonical. This means that you will always have the latest version of Certified Ubuntu images.

Please visit these pages for more information:

Find an Ubuntu Partner

Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud

About Canonical

Canonical is the company behind Ubuntu, the leading OS for container, cloud, scale-out and hyperscale computing. Sixty-five percent of large-scale OpenStack deployments are on Ubuntu, using both KVM and the pure-container LXD hypervisor for the world’s fastest private clouds. Canonical provides enterprise support and services for commercial users of Ubuntu.

Canonical leads the development of Juju, the model-driven operations system, and MAAS (Metal-as-a-Service), which creates a physical server cloud and IPAM for amazing data center operational efficiency. Canonical is a privately held company.

July 7, 2016

New SoftLayer Accounts Now With IBMid Authentication

Hi, and welcome to SoftLayer. We’re so happy you are joining our cloud family. For our new customers, if you haven’t heard the news, SoftLayer was acquired by IBM in 2013. With this comes transition, including the setup of an IBMid.

But this is a great news for our new customers because not only does this ID allow you to manage your SoftLayer account, but you can also access Bluemix-based services and resources by using a single sign-on. Although separate accounts, you can link your Bluemix and SoftLayer accounts. This is just a step toward providing you with an optimal IBM Cloud user experience.

Here’s what you need to know.

SoftLayer account login screen

Customers who created SoftLayer accounts after July 6, 2016 will need to follow the “IBMid Account Login” link at the bottom of the customer portal login page to use their IBMid to log in. Customers will be redirected to their Customer Portal Dashboard after their IBMid has been successfully authenticated.

Sign in to IBM

Two-Factor Authentication for IBMid Users

Customers with Two-Factor Authentication enabled will be asked to provide security code as shown below.

Two-Factor Authentication

How do I know if my account is using SoftLayer IDs or IBMids?

An IBMid is always an email address (e.g., joe@company.com). User accounts created after July 6, 2016 must follow the “IBMid Account Login” link and use their IBMid credentials, provided during their SoftLayer user creation process, to log into the SoftLayer customer portal.

If users do not know when their accounts were created and they’re using an email address to log in, they should attempt to use the SoftLayer login form first. In the future, these forms will be combined into a single one in order to simplify this experience.

Use of VPN Access and API Key

An IBMid cannot be used for VPN access. If a SoftLayer user has been granted VPN access, he or she can connect to VPN using the VPN username and password found on the customer’s profile page in the SoftLayer customer portal.

An IBMid cannot be used for API calls. If a SoftLayer user has been granted an API Key, that customer can access his or her API username and key on the profile page in the SoftLayer customer portal.

Access to VPN and API credentials has not changed for current users.

Edit User Profile

A Note to Our Current Customers

For the time being, existing accounts created prior to July 6, 2016 will continue to use the SoftLayer username and password authentication. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact your sales representative.

For more information, check out these KnowledgeLayer articles:

Reset the SoftLayer Customer Portal Password

Add a New User to a Customer Portal Account

Bluemix FAQ

Remove a User from the Customer Portal

Log in as a New User

Set Up Your Account

Customer Portal FAQ

Edit a User Profile

If you are experiencing issues with IBMid login, please email identsrv@us.ibm.com with the subject, "Problem Logging In With IBMid."

July 5, 2016

Figuring Out the “Why” of IBM

When IBM acquired SoftLayer, I felt proud. I thought, “Now we can make a difference.” Why did I feel that way, and why didn’t I think we could make a difference where we were? What brought out these feelings about IBM?

As I expand my knowledge of programming, I often come across books that don’t really pertain strictly to software development—but they pique my interest. The most recent of those is Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action by Simon Sinek, suggested in a recent talk by Mary Poppendiek about leading development. Start with Why is a book about product development, leadership, and life in general. It explains why we feel the way we do about certain companies and how we should move forward to generate that feeling about ourselves and the companies we believe in.

Who cares why?

In Start with Why, Sinek talks about several different big companies, including Apple, Harley-Davidson, and Walmart. He writes that one thing that is very important when developing a product or even working in a company is to understand that company’s “why.” What makes the company tick? He says Apple has a clear message about this: “to start a revolution.” He claims Apple is clear as to why they do what they do and it has formed a culture of people around it that cares more about that message than any one product they sell. The products, in turn, embody that message, as do Apple employees. This is why, when Apple decided to move into the phone, tablet, and music industry, rather than focus only computers and hardware, their customers moved with them. Although the differences between an Apple iPad and a Dell tablet might be small, Apple consumers like feeling that they are part of the Apple society, so they choose what they know and love, based on their gut instinct.

Think now about Harley-Davidson. Many of its customers have tattoos with the Harley-Davidson logo, because those customers identify with the lifestyle that Harley-Davison projects—a statement more about the person than the company. It says, “I am a Harley-Davison type of person.” Mitsubishi or Kawasaki could have similar bikes—of even better quality and cheaper prices—but that customer is choosing Harley-Davidson. They have made a lifetime commitment to a brand because they identify with the iconography and want to be a part of the society that is Harley-Davidson.

What is IBM’s “why”?

I applied the idea of “why” to my work and my company, bringing up the question, “What is IBM’s ‘why’?” In pursuit of this question, I searched “Why IBM?” on the IBM intranet. Luckily, there was a document meant for sales reps to help define IBM for new customers with the following on the first slide:

“IBM is a global information technology services company operating in over 170 countries. We bring innovative solutions to a diverse client base to help solve some of their toughest business challenges. In addition to being the world’s largest information technology and consulting services company, IBM is a global business and technology leader, innovating in research and development to shape the future of society at large.”

I dissected this blurb, pulling out the parts which describe IBM. I ended up with this:

  • IBM is large (the world’s largest)
  • IBM is global (diverse, international, in more than 170 countries)
  • IBM is business-oriented (solves business challenges)
  • IBM is a technology leader (innovative, focus on research and development)
  • IBM is shaping the future of society at large

Then I put it together into a single sentence:

“IBM is a large, global, business-oriented technology leader, shaping the future of society at large.”

That is when I realized that I was too focused on IBM’s “what,” so I removed everything that focused too heavily on the subject of the sentence (IBM) and focused my attention instead on the predicate. This left me with a single, easy sentence answering the questions: “Why is IBM?”, “What is its function?”, and “What are we trying to do?”.

“IBM is shaping the future of society at large.”

This is why IBMers get up in the morning. This is why we work hard. This is what we are hoping to accomplish in our own lives.

Simon Sinek states, “The 'why' comes from looking back.” Every person or company’s achievement should prove the “why”—so how do we prove IBM’s “why”? Let’s take a look at some of our victories in the past and present and compare.

In 1937, IBM’s tabulating equipment helped maintain employment records for 26 million people in support of the Social Security Act. In 1973-1974, IBM developed the Universal Product Code and released systems to support bar code scanning and automatic inventory maintenance. In a recent employee webcast, IBM’s senior vice president of Global Technology Services Martin Jetter communicated the idea, “We are the backbone of he world’s economy.” His supporting comments included our footprint in the airline industry, stating, “We manage the systems that support 25 percent of the total paid-passenger miles flown globally.” He also said, “Our services support 60 percent of daily card transactions in banking, 53 percent of mobile connections worldwide in telecom, and 61 percent of passenger vehicles produced in the auto industry.”

Lately, IBM brought attention to its revolutionary AI, better known as Watson, and is ushering in the idea of cognitive business analytics. In my opinion, these things prove that we are invested in shaping the future of a global society.

What does this mean about IBM? What does this mean about me?

I can’t speak for IBM as a whole, but I can talk about myself. I want to be a part of something bigger than myself; I want to contribute in a meaningful way, and understand what that contribution meant. I believe in a global society; we are all in this world together and I feel like there are more important issues that we can deal with other than our differences. I want to lead, or be a part of a team that leads; I strive to be successful. I am not OK with the status quo; I believe there is a better way. I have hope for the future. I don’t want to start a revolution. I want to be a part of something more pervasive, an underlying foundation that helps society thrive—not just changing society for the sake of change. I want to help lay a foundation that allows it to thrive and grow into something better. I believe that IBM identifies these goals, and projects this same message—a message that resonates with me at a very basic level. It sums up why I am proud to be an IBMer.

What about you?

“I am an IBMer” is not a sentiment that only employees need. In fact, it should go well beyond being employed at IBM. Our customers should feel the sentiment as well. Even people completely unaffiliated with IBM should be able to say, “I am an IBMer,” meaning that they believe in the same dream—the dream of a global society, working together to meet global goals; a dream about the future of society at-large.

What does IBM mean to you? Are you an IBMer too?

-Kevin Trachier

Categories: 
June 16, 2016

Larger Virtual Servers Now Available

You asked. We listened. We’re excited to announce that our clients can now provision virtual servers with more cores and more RAM.

Starting today, you’re now empowered to run high compute and in-memory intensive workloads on a public and private cloud with the same quick deployment and flexibility you’ve come to enjoy from SoftLayer. After all, you shouldn’t have to choose between flexibility and power.

Oh, and did we mention it’s all on demand? Deploy these new, larger sizes rapidly and start innovating—right now.

Whether you require a real-time analytics platform for healthcare, financial, or retail, these larger virtual servers provide the capabilities you need to harness and maximize analytics-driven solutions.

Popular use cases for larger virtual servers include real-time big data analytics solutions requiring millisecond execution as needed by organizations processing massive amounts of data, like weather companies. Given the immense amount of meteorological inputs required for any location, at any time, at millisecond speed, larger virtual server sizes power weather forecast responses in real-time.

With SoftLayer virtual servers, you can segment your data across public, private, and management networks for better reliability and speed. You get unmetered bandwidth across our private and management networks at no additional charge, and unmetered inbound bandwidth on our public network. As real-time data-intensive workloads are developed, SoftLayer ensures that our best-in-class network infrastructure can retrieve and move data with speed.

New Sizes

Drum roll, please! Our newest offerings include:

Public virtual servers

Private virtual servers

Public virtual servers will be customizable, but will have limitations on various core/RAM ratios. Private nodes will provide complete customization.

With the introduction of larger virtual servers, SoftLayer will also reconfigure socket/core ratios. The number of cores per socket is reflected below for newly deployed virtual servers:

Core:Socket Ratios

For clients using third-party software on virtual servers, it is recommended that you work with your software vendor to ensure socket-based licensing is properly licensed. 

Data Center Availability

Currently, larger public and private virtual servers will only be available in select data centers, with more coming online in the near future. The following locations will offer public and private virtual server combinations configured with more than 16 cores or more than 64 GB RAM:

Locations of larger public and private virtual servers

For more information on virtual servers and for pricing, read here.

We are always interested to see how you are flying in the cloud and how these larger virtual servers help drive value for your business. Please connect with us on Twitter: @milan3patel and @conradjjohnson.

-Milan Patel

Categories: 
June 1, 2016

For a Limited Time Only: Free POWER8 Servers

So maybe you’ve heard that POWER8 servers are now available from SoftLayer. But did you know you can try them for free?

Yep. That’s right. For. Free.

Even better: We’re excited to extend this offer to our new and existing customers. For a limited time only, our customers can take up to $2,238 off their entire order using promo code FREEPOWER8.

That’s a nice round number. (Not!)

I bet you’re wondering how we came up with that number. Well, $2,238 gets you the biggest, baddest POWER8-est machine we offer: POWER8 C812L-SSD, loaded with 10 cores, 3.49GHz, 512GB RAM, and 2x960GB SSDs. Of course, if you don’t need that much POWER (pun intended), we offer three other configs that might fit your lifestyle a little bit better. Check them out here.

 

For a limited time only, our customers can take up to $2,238 off their entire POWER8 order.

 

Oh, and the not-so-fine print (as if I have to say it, but legal told me I had to, so…): This offer is good only on POWER8 servers. (Duh!) The offer expires September 30, 2016. You’re limited to one promo code use per customer only. Customers take up to $2,238 off the first order in the first billing cycle of your POWER8 server (which means new customers should order at the beginning of the month to take full advantage of the offer; if you wait till the 20th of the month, you only get it for 10 days—11 depending on whether the month has 30 or 31 days, but I digress. And for existing customers, your current billing anniversary will dictate the length of time you can use POWER8). POWER8 is currently only rocking out in DAL09. This offer cannot be combined with any other offers, and SLIC accounts are not eligible.

For more information on this offer, please check out the FAQ or contact a sales representative. POWER up!

May 19, 2016

Bringing the power of GPUs to cloud

The GPU was invented by NVIDIA back in 1999 as a way to quickly render computer graphics by offloading the computational burden from the CPU. A great deal has happened since then—GPUs are now enablers for leading edge deep learning, scientific research, design, and “fast data” querying startups that have ambitions of changing the world.

That’s because GPUs are very efficient at manipulating computer graphics, image processing, and other computationally intensive high performance computing (HPC) applications. Their highly parallel structure makes them more effective than general purpose CPUs for algorithms where the processing of large blocks of data is done in parallel. GPUs, capable of handling multiple calculations at the same time, also have a major performance advantage. This is the reason SoftLayer (now part of IBM Cloud) has brought these capabilities to a broader audience.

We support the NVIDIA Tesla Accelerated Computing Platform, which makes HPC capabilities more accessible to, and affordable for, everyone. Companies like Artomatix and MapD are using our NVIDIA GPU offerings to achieve unprecedented speed and performance, traditionally only achievable by building or renting an HPC lab.

By provisioning SoftLayer bare metal servers with cutting-edge NVIDIA GPU accelerators, any business can harness the processing power needed for HPC. This enables businesses to manage the most complex, compute-intensive workloads—from deep learning and big data analytics to video effects—using affordable, on-demand computing infrastructure.

Take a look at some of the groundbreaking results companies like MapD are experiencing using GPU-enabled technology running on IBM Cloud. They’re making big data exploration visually interactive and insightful by using NVIDIA Tesla K80 GPU accelerators running on SoftLayer bare metal servers.

SoftLayer has also added the NVIDIA Tesla M60 GPU to our arsenal. This GPU technology enables clients to deploy fewer, more powerful servers on our cloud while being able to churn through more jobs. Specifically, running server simulations are cut down from weeks or days to hours when compared to using a CPU-only based server—think of performance running tools and applications like Amber for molecular dynamics, Terachem for quantum chemistry, and Echelon for oil and gas.

The Tesla M60 also speeds up virtualized desktop applications. There is widespread support for running virtualized applications such as AutoCAD to Siemens NX from a GPU server. This allows clients to centralize their infrastructure while providing access to the application, regardless of location. There are endless use cases with GPUs.

With this arsenal, we are one step closer to offering real supercomputing performance on a pay-as-you-go basis, which makes this new approach to tackling big data problems accessible to customers of all sizes. We are at an interesting inflection point in our industry, where GPU technology is opening the door for the next wave of breakthroughs across multiple industries.

-Jerry Gutierrez

May 17, 2016

New routes configured for SoftLayer customers

Customers will see a new route configured on a newly provisioned customer host or on a customer host after a portal-initiated OS reload. This is part of a greater goal to enable new services and offerings for SoftLayer customers. This route will direct traffic addressed to hosts configured out of the 161.26.0.0/16 network block (161.26.0.0 -161.26.255.255) to the back end private gateway IP address configured on customer servers or virtual server instances.

The 161.2.0.0/16 address space is assigned to SoftLayer by IANA and will not be advertised over the front end public network. This space will be used exclusively on SoftLayer’s backend private network, will never conflict with network addresses on the Internet, and should never conflict with address space used by third-party VPN service providers.

This new route is similar to the 10.0.0.0/8 route already located on SoftLayer hosts, in that SoftLayer services are addressed out of both ranges. Also, both the 10.0.0.0/8 route and the 161.26.0.0/16 route will need to be configured on a customer host if it is required to access all SoftLayer services hosted on the back end private network. Unlike the 10.0.0.0/8 range, the 161.26.0.0/16 range will be used exclusively for SoftLayer services. Customers will need to ensure that ACL/firewalls on customer servers, virtual server instances, and gateway appliances are configured to allow connectivity to the 161.26.0.0/16 network block to access these new services.

For more information on this new route, including how to configure existing systems to use them, read more on KnowledgeLayer.

-Curtis

May 5, 2016

Everything you need to know about IBM POWER8 on SoftLayer

SoftLayer provides industry-leading cloud Infrastructure as a Service from a growing number of data centers around the world. To enable clients to draw critical insights and make better decisions faster, now there’s even more good news—customers and partners can use and rely on the secure, flexible, and open platform of IBM POWER Systems, which have just become available in SoftLayer’s DAL09 data center.

POWER8 servers are built with a processor designed and optimized specifically for big data workloads combining compute power, cutting-edge memory bandwidth, and I/O in ways that result in increased levels of performance, resiliency, availability, and security.

IBM POWER systems were designed to run many of the most demanding enterprise applications, industry-specific solutions, relational database management systems, and high performance computing environments. POWER8 servers are an ideal system for Linux and support a vast ecosystem of OpenSource, ISV, and IBM SW Unit products, giving clients a single, industry-leading open architecture (IBM POWER) in which to store, retrieve, and derive value from the “gold mine” of next generation applications.

The new POWER8 servers available from SoftLayer offer an optimal hybrid cloud infrastructure to test new Linux workloads in a secure and isolated cloud environment with reduced risk. As clients explore newer use cases like advanced analytics, machine learning, and cognitive computing against the combination of vast amounts of both structured and unstructured data, POWER8 and SoftLayer are in a unique position to accelerate client value. This new offering will also continue to leverage the rapidly expanding community of developers contributing to the OpenPOWER ecosystem as well as thousands of independent software vendors that support Linux on Power applications.

With the explosive growth of both structured and unstructured data, it requires businesses to derive insights and change faster than ever to keep pace. The cloud enables you to do just that. Our new and unique solution pairs SoftLayer’s Network-Within-a-Network topology for true out-of-band access, an easy-to-use customer portal, and robust APIs for full remote access of all product and service management options—with the unique high performance technology from IBM POWER8 to help accelerate the creation and delivery of the next generation of IT solutions.    

For more details, visit our POWER8 servers page.

 

-Chuck Calio,  IBM Power Systems Growth Solution Specialist

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