Business Posts

November 21, 2012

Risk Management: The Importance of Redundant Backups

You (should) know the importance of having regular backups of your important data, but to what extent does data need to be backed up to be safe? With a crowbar and shove, thieves broke into my apartment and stole the backups I've used for hundreds of gigabytes of home videos, photo files and archives of past computers. A Dobro RAID enclosure and an external drive used by Apple Time Machine were both stolen, and if I didn't have the originals on my laptop or a redundant offsite backup, I would have lost all of my data. My experience is not uncommon, and it's a perfect example of an often understated principle that everyone should understand: You need redundant backups.

It's pretty simple: You need to back up your data regularly. When you've set up that back up schedule, you should figure out a way to back up your data again. After you've got a couple current backups of your files, you should consider backing up your backups off-site. It seems silly to think of backing up backups, but if anything happens — failed drives, theft, fire, flood, etc. — those backups could be lost forever, and if you've ever lost a significant amount of data due to a hard drive failure or experience like mine, you know that backups are worth their weight in gold.

Admittedly, there is a point of diminishing return when it comes to how much redundancy is needed — it's not worth the time/effort/cost to back up your backups ad infinitum — so here are the best practices I've come up with over the course of my career in the information technology industry:

  • Plan and schedule regular backups to keep your archives current. If your laptop's hard drive dies, having backups from last June probably won't help you as much as backups from last night.
  • Make sure your data exists on three different mediums. It might seem unnecessary, but if you're already being intentional about backing up your information, take it one step further to replicate those backups at least one more time.
  • Something might happen to your easy onsite backups, so it's important to consider off-site backups as well. There are plenty of companies offering secure online backups for home users, and those are generally easy to use (even if they can be a little slow).
  • Check your backups regularly. Having a backup is useless if it's not configured to back up the correct data and running on the correct schedule.
  • RAID is not a backup solution. Yes, RAID can duplicate data across hard drives, but that doesn't mean the data is "backed up" ... If the RAID array fails, all of the hard drives (and all of the data) in the array fail with it.

It's important to note here that "off-site" is a pretty relative term when it comes to backups. Many SoftLayer customers back up a primary drive on their server to a secondary drive on the same server (duplicating the data away from the original drive), and while that's better than nothing, it's also a little risky because it's possible that the server could fail and corrupt both drives. Every backup product SoftLayer offers for customers is off-site relative to the server itself (though it might be in the same facility), so we also make it easy to have your backup in another city or on a different continent.

As I've mentioned already, once you set up your backups, you're not done. You need to check your backups regularly for failures and test them to confirm that you can recover your data quickly in the event of a disaster. Don't just view a file listing. Try extracting files or restore the whole backup archive. If you're able to run a full restore without the pressure of an actual emergency, it'll prove that you're ready for the unexpected ... Like a fire drill for your backups.

Setting up a backup plan doesn't have to be scary or costly. If you don't feel like you could recover quickly after losing your data, spend a little time evaluating ways to make a recovery like that easy. It's crazy, but a big part of "risk management," "disaster recovery" and "business continuity" is simply making sure your data is securely backed up regularly and available to you when you need it.

Plan, prepare, back up.

-Lyndell

November 16, 2012

Going Global: Domo Arigato, Japan

I'm SoftLayer's director of international operations, so I have the unique pleasure of spending a lot of time on airplanes and in hotels as I travel between Dallas, Amsterdam, Singapore and wherever else our event schedule dictates. In the past six months, I've spent most of my time in Asia, and I've tried to take advantage of the opportunity relearn the culture to help shape SoftLayer Asia's business.

To really get a sense the geographic distance between Dallas and Singapore, find a globe and put one index finger on Dallas and put your other index finger on Singapore. To travel from one location to the other, you fly to the other side of the planet. Given the space considerations, our network map uses a scaled-down representative topology to show our points of presence in a single view, and you get a sense of how much artistic license was used when you actually make the trip to Singapore.

Global Network

The longest currently scheduled commercial flight on the planet takes you from Singapore to Newark in a cool 19 hours, but I choose to maintain my sanity rather than set world records for amount of time spent in a metal tube. I usually hop from Dallas to Tokyo (a mere 14 hours away) where I spend a few days, and I get on another plane down to Singapore.

The break between the two legs of the trip serves a few different purposes ... I get a much needed escape from the confines of an airplane, I'm able to spend time in an amazing city (where I lived 15 years ago), and I can use the opportunity to explore the market for SoftLayer. Proximity and headcount dictated that we spend most of our direct marketing and sales time focusing on the opportunities radiating from Singapore, so we haven't been able to spend as much time as we'd like in Japan. Fortunately, we've been able organically grow our efforts in the country through community-based partnerships and sponsorships, and we owe a great deal of our success to our partners in the region and our new-found friends. I've observed from our experience in Japan that the culture breeds two contrasting business realities that create challenges and opportunities for companies like SoftLayer: Japan is insular and Japan is global.

When I say that Japan is insular, I mean that IT purchases are generally made in the realm of either Japanese firms or foreign firms that have spent decades building reputation in market. Becoming a trusted part of that market is a time-consuming (and expensive) endeavor, and it's easy for a business to be dissuaded as an outsider. The contrasting reality that Japanese businesses also have a huge need for global reach is where SoftLayer can make an immediate impact.

Consider the Japanese electronics and the automobile industries. Both were built internally before making the leap to other geographies, and over the course of decades, they have established successful brands worldwide. Japanese gaming companies, social media companies and vibrant start-up communities follow a similar trend ... only faster. The capital investment required to go global is negligible compared to their forebears because they don't need to build factories or put elaborate logistics operations in place anymore. Today, a Japanese company with a SaaS solution, a game or a social media experience can successfully share it with the world in a matter minutes or hours at minimal cost, and that's where SoftLayer is able to immediately serve the Japanese market.

The process of building the SoftLayer brand in Asia has been accelerated by the market's needs, and we don't take that for granted. We plan to continue investing in local communities and working with our partners to become a trusted and respected resource in the market, and we are grateful for the opportunities those relationships have opened for us ... Or as Styx would say, "Domo Arigato, Mr. Roboto."

-@quigleymar

November 14, 2012

Risk Management: Securing Your Servers

How do you secure your home when you leave? If you're like most people, you make sure to lock the door you leave from, and you head off to your destination. If Phil is right about "locks keeping honest people honest," simply locking your front door may not be enough. When my family moved into a new house recently, we evaluated its physical security and tried to determine possible avenues of attack (garage, doors, windows, etc.), tools that could be used (a stolen key, a brick, a crowbar, etc.) and ways to mitigate the risk of each kind of attack ... We were effectively creating a risk management plan.

Every risk has different probabilities of occurrence, potential damages, and prevention costs, and the risk management process helps us balance the costs and benefits of various security methods. When it comes to securing a home, the most effective protection comes by using layers of different methods ... To prevent a home invasion, you might lock your door, train your dog to make intruders into chew toys and have an alarm system installed. Even if an attacker can get a key to the house and bring some leftover steaks to appease the dog, the motion detectors for the alarm are going to have the police on their way quickly. (Or you could violate every HOA regulation known to man by digging a moat around the house, filling with sharks with laser beams attached to their heads, and building a medieval drawbridge over the moat.)

I use the example of securing a house because it's usually a little more accessible than talking about "server security." Server security doesn't have to be overly complex or difficult to implement, but its stigma of complexity usually prevents systems administrators from incorporating even the simplest of security measures. Let's take a look at the easiest steps to begin securing your servers in the context of their home security parallels, and you'll see what I'm talking about.

Keep "Bad People" Out: Have secure password requirements.

Passwords are your keys and your locks — the controls you put into place that ensure that only the people who should have access get it. There's no "catch all" method of keeping the bad people out of your systems, but employing a variety of authentication and identification measures can greatly enhance the security of your systems. A first line of defense for server security would be to set password complexity and minimum/maximum password age requirements.

If you want to add an additional layer of security at the authentication level, you can incorporate "Strong" or "Two-Factor" authentication. From there, you can learn about a dizzying array of authentication protocols (like TACACS+ and RADIUS) to centralize access control or you can use active directory groups to simplify the process of granting and/or restricting access to your systems. Each layer of authentication security has benefits and drawbacks, and most often, you'll want to weigh the security risk against your need for ease-of-use and availability as you plan your implementation.

Stay Current on your "Good People": When authorized users leave, make sure their access to your system leaves with them.

If your neighbor doesn't return borrowed tools to your tool shed after you gave him a key when he was finishing his renovation, you need to take his key back when you tell him he can't borrow any more. If you don't, nothing is stopping him from walking over to the shed when you're not looking and taking more (all?) of your tools. I know it seems like a silly example, but that kind of thing is a big oversight when it comes to server security.

Employees are granted access to perform their duties (the principle of least privilege), and when they no longer require access, the "keys to the castle" should be revoked. Auditing who has access to what (whether it be for your systems or for your applications) should be continual.

You might have processes in place to grant and remove access, but it's also important to audit those privileges regularly to catch any breakdowns or oversights. The last thing you want is to have a disgruntled former employee wreak all sorts of havoc on your key systems, sell proprietary information or otherwise cost you revenue, fines, recovery efforts or lost reputation.

Catch Attackers: Monitor your systems closely and set up alerts if an intrusion is detected.

There is always a chance that bad people are going to keep looking for a way to get into your house. Maybe they'll walk around the house to try and open the doors and windows you don't use very often. Maybe they'll ring the doorbell and if no lights turn on, they'll break a window and get in that way.

You can never completely eliminate all risk. Security is a continual process, and eventually some determined, over-caffeinated hacker is going to find a way in. Thinking your security is impenetrable makes you vulnerable if by some stretch of the imagination, an attacker breaches your security (see: Trojan Horse). Continuous monitoring strategies can alert administrators if someone does things they shouldn't be doing. Think of it as a motion detector in your house ... "If someone gets in, I want to know where they are." When you implement monitoring, logging and alerting, you will also be able to recover more quickly from security breaches because every file accessed will be documented.

Minimize the Damage: Lock down your system if it is breached.

A burglar smashes through your living room window, runs directly to your DVD collection, and takes your limited edition "Saved by the Bell" series box set. What can you do to prevent them from running back into the house to get the autographed posted of Alf off of your wall?

When you're monitoring your servers and you get alerted to malicious activity, you're already late to the game ... The damage has already started, and you need to minimize it. In a home security environment, that might involve an ear-piercing alarm or filling the moat around your house even higher so the sharks get a better angle to aim their laser beams. File integrity monitors and IDS software can mitigate damage in a security breach by reverting files when checksums don't match or stopping malicious behavior in its tracks.

These recommendations are only a few of the first-line layers of defense when it comes to server security. Even if you're only able to incorporate one or two of these tips into your environment, you should. When you look at server security in terms of a journey rather than a destination, you can celebrate the progress you make and look forward to the next steps down the road.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to go to a meeting where I'm proposing moats, drawbridges, and sharks with laser beams on their heads to SamF for data center security ... Wish me luck!

-Matthew

October 16, 2012

An Introduction to Risk Management

Whether you're managing a SaaS solution for thousands of large clients around the world or you're running a small mail server for a few mom-and-pop businesses in your neighborhood, you're providing IT service for a fee — and your customers expect you to deliver. It's easy to get caught up in focusing your attention and energy on day-to-day operations, and in doing so, you might neglect some of the looming risks that threaten the continuity of your business. You need to prioritize risk assessment and management.

Just reading that you need to invest in "Risk Management" probably makes you shudder. Admittedly, when a business owner has to start quantifying and qualifying potential areas of business risk, the process can seem daunting and full of questions ... "What kinds of risks should I be concerned with?" "Once I find a potential risk, should I mitigate it? Avoid it? Accept it?" "How much do I need to spend on risk management?"

When it comes to risk management in hosting, the biggest topics are information security, backups and disaster recovery. While those general topics are common, each business's needs will differ greatly in each area. Because risk management isn't a very "cookie-cutter" process, it's intimidating. It's important to understand that protecting your business from risks isn't a destination ... it's a journey, and whatever you do, you'll be better off than you were before you did it.

Because there's not a "100% Complete" moment in the process of risk management, some people think it's futile — a gross waste of time and resources. History would suggest that risk management can save companies millions of dollars, and that's just when you look at failures. You don't see headlines when businesses effectively protect themselves from attempted hacks or when sites automatically fail over to a new server after a hardware failure.

It's unfortunate how often confidential customer data is unintentionally released by employees or breached by malicious attackers. Especially because those instances are often so easily preventable. When you understand the potential risks of your business's confidential data in the hands of the wrong people (whether malicious attackers or careless employees), you'll usually take action to avoid quantifiable losses like monetary fines and unquantifiable ones like the loss of your reputation.

More and more, regulations are being put in place to holding companies accountable for protecting their sensitive information. In the healthcare industry businesses have to meet the strict Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations. Sites that accept credit card payments online are required to operate in Payment Card Industry (PCI) Compliance. Data centers will spend hours (and hours and hours) achieving and maintaining their SSAE 16 certification. These rules and requirements are not arbitrarily designed to be restrictive (though they can feel that way sometimes) ... They are based on best practices to ultimately protect businesses in those industries from risks that are common throughout the respective industry.

Over the coming months, I'll discuss ways that you as a SoftLayer customer can mitigate and manage your risk. We'll talk about security and backup plans that will incrementally protect your business and your customers. While we won't get to the destination of 100% risk-mitigated operations, we'll get you walking down the path of continuous risk assessment, identification and mitigation.

Stay tuned!

-Matthew

September 21, 2012

Powering Cloud Automation Through Partnerships

When SoftLayer began back in 2005, the term “cloud computing” was rarely used if at all. The founders of SoftLayer had an ambitious vision and plan to build a service platform that could easily automate, scale and meet the demands of the most sophisticated IT users. They were obviously onto something. Since then, we’ve emerged as the world’s largest privately held Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) provider, helping the next generation of web savvy entrepreneurs realize their dreams. But we didn’t do it alone. We had partnerships in place—including working with Parallels.

Today everyone is trying to scramble and figure out how this “new” IT shift will work itself out. Our friends over at Parallels had a similar ambitious undertaking—trying to automate and enable a complete gamut of hosting and cloud services. This created a framework for our partnership. We worked with their engineering and sales teams, starting back in 2005, which resulted in Parallels Plesk Panel being offered as an option on every SoftLayer server. That was just the beginning. We are now deploying Parallels Automation for hosting partners and have plans to integrate with their Application Packaging Standard offering. Plans to integrate with other products like Parallels Cloud Server are also on the horizon. It all comes down to helping hosting companies and other joint customers thrive and succeed.

To find out more about our partnership and how it can help streamline your entry into cloud computing click here. We are also the only “Diamond” sponsor at the Parallels Summit 2012 APAC in Singapore this year. We share a heritage and understanding with Parallels borne from a need to simplify and solve IT problems on a broad scale. Now that’s what I call a likeminded partnership.

-@gkdog

September 17, 2012

Joining the Internet Infrastructure Coalition

In January, we posted a series of blogs about legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate that would have had a serious impact on the hosting industry. We talked about SOPA and PIPA, and how those proposed laws would "break the Internet" as we know it. The hosting industry rallied together to oppose the passage of those bills, and in doing so, we proved to be a powerful collective force.

In the months that followed the shelving of SOPA and PIPA, many of the hosting companies that were active in the fight were invited to join a new coalition that would focus on proposed legislation that affects Internet infrastructure providers ... The Internet Infrastructure Coalition (or "i2Coalition") was born. i2Coalition co-founder and Board Chair Christian Dawson explains the basics:

SoftLayer is proud to be a Charter Member of i2Coalition, and we're excited to see how many vendors, partners, peers and competitors have joined us. Scrolling the ranks of founding members is a veritable "Who's who?" of the companies that make up the "nuts and bolts" of the Internet.

The goal of i2Coalition is to facilitate public policy education and advocacy, develop market-driven standards formed by consensus and give the industry a unified voice. On the i2Coalition's Public Policy page, that larger goal is broken down into focused priorities, with the first being

"In all public policy initiatives of the i2Coalition will be to encourage the growth and development of the Internet infrastructure industry and to protect the interests of members of the Coalition consistent with this development."

Another huge priority worth noting is the focus on enabling and promoting the free exercise of human rights — including freedom of speech, freedom of assembly and the protection of personal privacy. Those rights are essential to fostering effective Internet advancement and to maintain a free and open Internet, and SoftLayer is a strong supporter of that platform.

If you operate in the hosting or Internet infrastructure space and you want to be part of the i2Coalition, we encourage you to become a member and join the conversation. When policymakers are talking about getting "an Internet" from their staff members, we know that there are plenty of opportunities to educate and provide context on the technical requirements and challenges that would result from proposed legislation, and the Internet Infrastructure Coalition is well equipped to capitalize on those opportunities.

-@toddmitchell

July 30, 2012

Don't Stop Believing (in Hosting)

If 80's movies have taught me anything, it's that any good story needs to have a video montage with Journey playing in the background. With that in mind, I'll start this blog post with a glimpse of HostingCon 2012:

HostingCon brings the hosting industry together every year, and the conference winds up being surprisingly similar to classic 80's "coming of age" movies:

  • "Geeks" are among the main characters.
  • There's always a "funny guy."
  • At some point, the geeks attend a party.
  • The characters learn more about themselves and others over the course of the movie.
  • As the credits roll, everyone is inspired ... Ready to take on the world.

With that in mind, HostingCon 2012 in Boston was a veritable John Hughes flick. There was no shortage of geeks, we hung out with one of the funniest people in the country, we threw a massive party, and we learned a ton. Without a doubt, attendees returned home with their intensity and enthusiasm cranked up to eleven (another 80's reference).

The expo hall was abuzz with activity — albeit after a lull in the morning following the aptly named "Host Me All Night Long" party — and we enjoyed the opportunity to catch up with current partners and customers while meeting and speaking with soon-to-be partners and customers. While running a highly competitive Server Challenge, we were still able to dive deeper into partnerships, the build v. buy decision, branding, and launching a product when attendees visited our booth after hearing from our team in conference sessions and panels, and those conversations are what keep us coming back to HostingCon every year.

As a "veteran" of the hosting industry (assuming seven years of experience qualifies me), I've learned a great deal about the dynamics of the hosting industry from events like HostingCon over the years. On one hand, many of the attendees are "competitors," and on the other hand, we're all trying to make the industry better (since "a rising tide lifts all boats"). As a great example, look at the Internet Infrastructure Coalition (i2C), a trade association of companies with the shared goal and purpose of representing the industry in Washington, D.C., and beyond.

As it turns out, that unity flew out the door when attendees stood face-to-rack with the Server Challenge, though. Unlike our experiences at more general "technology" conferences, the components in our competition needed no introduction, and participants were particularly driven to best their peers ... not only for the iPad, but for the pride of owning the Server Challenge title at HostingCon:

  1. Darin Goldman - 0:59.28
  2. Devon Hillard - 1:01.58
  3. Ijan Kruizinga - 1:01.83
  4. Jon Basha - 1:03.02
  5. Sean Whitley - 1:03.06

As you saw in the video, Darin Goldman had the luxury of not needing his second attempt on the final day of the conference to secure a victory, but we were glad he let us record his "Breakfast Club" fist-pump to share with the world.

Fist Pump

Don't stop believing (in hosting).

-@khazard

P.S. I recorded the first few minutes of Ralphie May's set, but the adult language-ness of the content makes it a little more difficult to share with the world.

Categories: 
July 12, 2012

An Insider's Look at SoftLayer's Growth in Amsterdam

Last week, SoftLayer was featured on the NOS national news here in the Netherlands in a segment that allowed us to tell our story and share how we're settling into our new Amsterdam home. I've only been a SLayer for about nine months now, and as I watched the video, I started to reflect on how far we've come in such a surprisingly short time. Take a second to check it out (don't worry, it's not all in Dutch):

To say that I had to "hit the ground running" when I started at SoftLayer would be an understatement. The day after I got the job, I was on a plane to SoftLayer's Dallas headquarters to meet the team behind the company. To be honest, it was a pretty daunting task, but I was energized at the opportunity to learn about how SoftLayer became largest privately owned hosting company in the world from the people who started it. When I look back at the interview Kevin recorded with me, I'm surprised that I didn't look like a deer in the headlights. At the time, AMS01 was still in the build-out phase, so my tours and meetings in DAL05 were both informative and awe-inspiring.

When I returned to Europe, I was energized to start playing my role in the company's new pursuit of its global goals.

It didn't take long before I started seeing the same awe-inspiring environment take place in our Amsterdam facility ... So much so that I'm convinced that at least a few of the "Go Live Crew" members were superhuman. As it turns out, when you build identical data center pods in every location around the world, you optimize the process and figure out the best ways to efficiently use your time.

By the time the Go Live Crew started packing following the successful (and on-time) launch of AMS01, I started feeling the pressure. The first rows of server racks were already being filled by customers, but the massive data center space seemed impossibly large when I started thinking of how quickly we could fill it. Most of my contacts in Europe were not familiar with the SoftLayer name, and because my assigned region was Europe Middle East and Africa — a HUGE diverse region with many languages, cultures and currencies — I knew I had my work cut out for me.

I thought, "LET'S DO THIS!"

EMEA is home to some of the biggest hosting markets in the world, so my first-week whirlwind tour of Dallas actually set the stage quite nicely for what I'd be doing in the following months: Racking up air miles, jumping onto trains, attending countless trade shows, meeting with press, reaching out to developer communities and corresponding with my fellow SLayers in the US and Asia ... All while managing the day-to-day operations of the Amsterdam office. As I look back at that list, I'm amazed how the team came together to make sure everything got done.

We have come a long way.

As I started writing this blog, BusinessReview Europe published a fantastic piece on SoftLayer in their July 2012 magazine (starting on page 172) that seems to succinctly summarize how we've gotten where we are today: "Innovation Never Sleeps."

BusinessReview Europe

Our first pod is almost full of servers humming and flashing. When we go to tradeshows and conferences throughout Europe, people not only know SoftLayer, many of them are customers with servers in AMS01. That's the kind of change we love.

The best part of my job right now is that our phenomenal success in the past nine months is just a glimmer of what the future holds. Come to think of it, we're going to need some more people.

-@jpwisler

June 29, 2012

We're Shipping Up to Boston - HostingCon 2012

It's that time of year again ... HostingCon is upon us, and we're faced with an interesting challenge: Go even bigger and badder in Boston than we did at HostingCon 2011 in San Diego. And that's a tall order.

Given the fact that we've already sponsored and participated in dozens of conferences around the world this year, you might be surprised to learn that we've still got a surprises in our bag of tricks. Without giving too much away, I thought I'd share a few of the SoftLayer-specific highlights you make note of if you're planning your HostingCon itinerary.

Conference Sessions

Want some hosting insight from the executive management team of one of the largest privately held hosting providers in the world? You might want to add these sessions to your calendar:

Partnerships Done Right
Lance Crosby, CEO
9:00am – Monday, July 16
Management Track

As more "non-traditional" hosters (telcos, cable companies & VARs) enter the cloud services market finding the right partner is a must. The opportunity is huge but this isn’t a situation where a rising tide will float all boats. Lance Crosby, CEO of SoftLayer will explain how, in order to be successful, you’ll need to understand the following: 1) Building for Internet Scale, 2) Think platform first, and 3) How to automate. The session will include discussion of how SoftLayer leverages partners to drive business growth.

Build vs Buy: Operations & Billing Automation
Nathan Day, Chief Scientist (+ Panel)
9:00am – Tuesday, July 17
Technology Track

The finance, operations and administrative back office of a hosting company can be a complex animal. Some hosts have dedicated software development teams to build in-house solutions, others opt to buy as much as they can from 3rd party vendors. Hear three different approaches to tackling the problem, and learn how your product line can determine the optimal mix of open source, home grown and off-the-shelf solutions.

Finding Your Story: Branding and Positioning in the Hosting Industry
Simon West, CMO
2:00pm – Tuesday, July 17
Sales & Marketing Track

In a crowded marketplace it's critical to establish a clear position and identity in the minds of your customers and prospects. SoftLayer CMO Simon West will discuss best practices for defining and articulating your brand position, illustrating with specific examples drawn from his experience in building some of the industry's most notable brands.

Build, Launch, Sell: Strategies for Launching a Product in the Hosting Business
George Karidis, CSO (+ Panel)
3:00pm – Tuesday, July 17
Management Track

Introducing value-added services around basic hosting can be the strategy that turns a hosting business into a winning venture for the host, and a truly valuable service for the customer. In this interactive session, a panel of product management experts from the hosting business will cover best practices for building (or integrating), launching and selling a new product to your customers, helping you to develop processes, procedures and strategies for seeing a new product launch through from start to finish.

The SoftLayer Booth: #413

When you step into the expo hall at the John B. Hynes Convention Center, you're going to see SoftLayer. In our 20' x 30' space at booth 413, we'll have a few of your favorite SLayers available to answer any and all of your questions about what's new and what's next for SoftLayer ... And to pass out some always-popular SoftLayer swag.

SoftLayer Booth

By popular demand, the Server Challenge will be making its return to HostingCon, and if last year is any indication, the competition will be fierce. The pride of besting all HostingCon attendees in reassembling a server rack is arguably as valuable as the New iPad the winner receives. Though your pride doesn't have a Retina Display.

Host Me All Night Long

Following the phenomenal success of "Geeks Gone Wild" last year (headlined by The Dan Band), we knew we had our work cut out for us when it came to planning a party for HostingCon in Boston. We've teamed up with cPanel and comcure to put together "Host Me All Night Long" at Royale Boston on Monday, July 16.

Host Me All Night Long

One of my favorite comedians, Ralphie May, is going hit the stage at 8pm, and you won't want to miss a second of his set. Following Ralphie, Yellow Brick Road is bringing their award-winning Classic Rock tribute skills from Las Vegas to keep the night going. Given the name of the party, you shouldn't be surprised when a little AC/DC "You Shook Me All Night Long" is played.

Like last year, the attendance is strictly limited, and when the number of tickets available at http://hostingconparty.com/ reaches zero, you're out of luck. Even if you're our best customer ever, you need a ticket to get in the door, so register while you can! If you show a little extra SoftLayer love on Twitter or Facebook, send me a link to it (khazard@softlayer.com), and I might be able to hook you up with a VIP code to get you priority access and into the VIP section at the venue.

Like the Dropkick Murphys, we're "shipping up to Boston," and we hope to see you there!

-@khazard

June 6, 2012

Today's Technology "Game Changers": IPv6 and Cloud

"Game Changers" in technology force a decision: Adapt or die. When repeating rifles gained popularity in the late 1800s, a business of manufacturing muzzle-loading or breech-loading rifles would have needed to find a way to produce a repeating rifle or it would have lost most (if not all) of it's business to Winchester. If a fresh-faced independent musician is hitting it big on the coffee shop scene in 2012, she probably won't be selling out arenas any time soon if she refuses to make her music available digitally. Just ask any of the old-timers in the print media industry ... "Game Changers" in technology can be disastrous for an established business in an established industry.

That's pretty intimidating ... Even for tech businesses.

Shifts in technology don't have to be as drastic and obvious as a "printed newspaper v. social news site" comparison for them to be disruptive. Even subtle advances can wind up making or breaking a business. In fact, many of today's biggest and most successful tech companies are scrambling to adapt to two simple "game changers" that seem terribly significant:

  • IPv6
  • "The Cloud"

IPv6

A quick search of the SoftLayer Blog reminds me that Lance first brought up the importance of IPv6 adoption in October 2007:

ARIN has publically announced the need to shift to IPv6 and numerous articles have outlined the D-Day for IPv4 space. Most experts agree, its coming fast and that it will occur sometime in 2010 at the current pace (that's about two years for those counting). IPv6 brings enough IP space for an infinite number of users along with improved security features and several other operational efficiencies that will make it very popular. The problem lies between getting from IPv4 to IPv6.

When IPv4 exhaustion was just a blip on the horizon, many businesses probably thought, "Oh, I'll get around to it when I need to. It's not a problem yet." When IANA exhausted the IPv4 pool, they probably started picking up the phone and calling providers to ask what plans they had in place. When some of the Internet's biggest websites completed a trial transition to IPv6 on World IPv6 Day last year, those businesses started feeling the urgency. With today's World IPv6 Launch, they know something has to be done.

World IPv6 Launch Day

Regardless of how conservative providers get with IPv4 space, the 4,294,967,296 IPv4 addresses in existence will not last much longer. Soon, users will be accessing an IPv6 Internet, and IPv4-only websites will lose their opportunity to reach those users. That's a "game changer."

"The Cloud"

The other "game changer" many tech businesses are struggling with these days is the move toward "the cloud." There are a two interesting perspectives in this transition: 1) The challenge many businesses face when choosing whether to adopt cloud computing, and 2) The challenges for businesses that find themselves severing as an integral (sometimes unintentional) part of "the cloud." You've probably seen hundreds of blog posts and articles about the first, so I'll share a little insight on the second.

When you hear all of the hype about cloud computing and cloud storage offering a hardware-agnostic Utopia of scalable, reliable power, it's easy to forget that the building blocks of a cloud infrastructure will usually come from vendors that provided a traditional hosting resources. When a computing instance is abstracted from a hardware device, it's opens up huge variations in usage. It's possible to have dozens of public cloud instances using a single server's multi-proc, multi-core resources at a given time. If a vendor prices a piece of software on a "per server" basis, how do they define a "server" when their users are in the cloud? It can be argued that a cloud computing instance with a single core of power is a "server," and on the flip-side, it's easy to define a "server" as the hardware object on which many cloud instances may run. I don't know that there's an easy way to answer that question, but what I do know is that applying "what used to work" to "what's happening now" isn't the right answer.

The hardware and software providers in the cloud space who are able to come up with new approaches unencumbered by the urge to continue "the way we've always done it" are going to be the ones that thrive when technology "game changers" emerge, and the providers who dig their heels in the dirt or try to put a square peg into a round hole will get the short end of the "adapt or die" stick.

We've tried to innovate and take a fresh look at every opportunity that has come our way, and we do our best to build relationships with agile companies that we see following suit.

I guess a better way to position the decision at the beginning of this post would be to add a little tweak: "Innovate, adapt or die." How you approach technology "game changers" will define your business's success.

-@gkdog

Subscribe to business