cloud

July 16, 2013

Riak Performance Analysis: Bare Metal v. Virtual

In December, I posted a MongoDB performance analysis that showed the quantitative benefits of using bare metal servers for MongoDB workloads. It should come as no surprise that in the wake of SoftLayer's Riak launch, we've got some similar data to share about running Riak on bare metal.

To run this test, we started by creating five-node clusters with Riak 1.3.1 on SoftLayer bare metal servers and on a popular competitor's public cloud instances. For the SoftLayer environment, we created these clusters using the Riak Solution Designer, so the nodes were all provisioned, configured and clustered for us automatically when we ordered them. For the public cloud virtual instance Riak cluster, each node was provisioned indvidually using a Riak image template and manually configured into a cluster after all had come online. To optimize for Riak performance, I made a few tweaks at the OS level of our servers (running CentOS 64-bit):

Noatime
Nodiratime
barrier=0
data=writeback
ulimit -n 65536

The common Noatime and Nodiratime settings eliminate the need for writes during reads to help performance and disk wear. The barrier and writeback settings are a little less common and may not be what you'd normally set. Although those settings present a very slight risk for loss of data on disk failure, remember that the Riak solution is deployed in five-node rings with data redundantly available across multiple nodes in the ring. With that in mind and considering each node also being deployed with a RAID10 storage array, you can see that the minor risk for data loss on the failure of a single disk in the entire solution would have no impact on the entire data set (as there are plenty of redundant copies for that data available). Given the minor risk involved, the performance increases of those two settings justify their use.

With all of the nodes tweaked and configured into clusters, we set up Basho's test harness — Basho Bench — to remotely simulate load on the deployments. Basho Bench allows you to create a configurable test plan for a Riak cluster by configuring a number of workers to utilize a driver type to generate load. It comes packaged as an Erlang application with a config file example that you can alter to create the specifics for the concurrency, data set size, and duration of your tests. The results can be viewed as CSV data, and there is an optional graphics package that allows you to generate the graphs that I am posting in this blog. A simplified graphic of our test environment would look like this:

Riak Test Environment

The following Basho Bench config is what we used for our testing:

{mode, max}.
{duration, 120}.
{concurrent, 8}.
{driver, basho_bench_driver_riakc_pb}.
{key_generator,{int_to_bin,{uniform_int,1000000}}}.
{value_generator,{exponential_bin,4098,50000}}.
{riakc_pb_ips, [{10,60,68,9},{10,40,117,89},{10,80,64,4},{10,80,64,8},{10,60,68,7}]}.
{riakc_pb_replies, 2}.
{operations, [{get, 10},{put, 1}]}.

To spell it out a little simpler:

Tests Performed

Data Set: 400GB
10:1 Query-to-Update Operations
8 Concurrent Client Connections
Test Duration: 2 Hours

You may notice that in the test cases that use SoftLayer "Medium" Servers, the virtual provider nodes are running 26 virtual compute units against our dual proc hex-core servers (12 cores total). In testing with Riak, memory is important to the operations than CPU resources, so we provisioned the virtual instances to align with the 36GB of memory in each of the "Medium" SoftLayer servers. In the public cloud environment, the higher level of RAM was restricted to packages with higher CPU, so while the CPU counts differ, the RAM amounts are as close to even as we could make them.

One final "housekeeping" note before we dive into the results: The graphs below are pulled directly from the optional graphics package that displays Basho Bench results. You'll notice that the scale on the left-hand side of graphs differs dramatically between the two environments, so a cursory look at the results might not tell the whole story. Click any of the graphs below for a larger version. At the end of each test case, we'll share a few observations about the operations per second and latency results from each test. When we talk about latency in the "key observation" sections, we'll talk about the 99th percentile line — 99% of the results had latency below this line. More simply you could say, "This is the highest latency we saw on this platform in this test." The primary reason we're focusing on this line is because it's much easier to read on the graphs than the mean/median lines in the bottom graphs.

Riak Test 1: "Small" Bare Metal 5-Node Cluster vs Virtual 5-Node Cluster

Servers

SoftLayer Small Riak Server Node
Single 4-core Intel 1270 CPU
64-bit CentOS
8GB RAM
4 x 500GB SATAII – RAID10
1Gb Bonded Network
Virtual Provider Node
4 Virtual Compute Units
64-bit CentOS
7.5GB RAM
4 x 500GB Network Storage – RAID10
1Gb Network
 

Results

Riak Performance Analysis

Riak Performance Analysis

Key Observations

The SoftLayer environment showed much more consistency in operations per second with an average throughput around 450 Op/sec. The virtual environment throughput varied significantly between about 50 operations per second to more than 600 operations per second with the trend line fluctuating slightly between about 220 Op/sec and 350 Op/sec.

Comparing the latency of get and put requests, the 99th percentile of results in the SoftLayer environment stayed around 50ms for gets and under 200ms for puts while the same metric for the virtual environment hovered around 800ms in gets and 4000ms in puts. The scale of the graphs is drastically different, so if you aren't looking closely, you don't see how significantly the performance varies between the two.

Riak Test 2: "Medium" Bare Metal 5-Node Cluster vs Virtual 5-Node Cluster

Servers

SoftLayer Medium Riak Server Node
Dual 6-core Intel 5670 CPUs
64-bit CentOS
36GB RAM
4 x 300GB 15K SAS – RAID10
1Gb Network – Bonded
Virtual Provider Node
26 Virtual Compute Units
64-bit CentOS
30GB RAM
4 x 300GB Network Storage
1Gb Network
 

Results

Riak Performance Analysis

Riak Performance Analysis

Key Observations

Similar to the results of Test 1, the throughput numbers from the bare metal environment are more consistent (and are consistently higher) than the throughput results from the virtual instance environment. The SoftLayer environment performed between 1500 and 1750 operations per second on average while the virtual provider environment averaged around 1200 operations per second throughout the test.

The latency of get and put requests in Test 2 also paints a similar picture to Test 1. The 99th percentile of results in the SoftLayer environment stayed below 50ms and under 400ms for puts while the same metric for the virtual environment averaged about 250ms in gets and over 1000ms in puts. Latency in a big data application can be a killer, so the results from the virtual provider might be setting off alarm bells in your head.

Riak Test 3: "Medium" Bare Metal 5-Node Cluster vs Virtual 5-Node Cluster

Servers

SoftLayer Medium Riak Server Node
Dual 6-core Intel 5670 CPUs
64-bit CentOS
36GB RAM
4 x 128GB SSD – RAID10
1Gb Network – Bonded
Virtual Provider Node
26 Virtual Compute Units
64-bit CentOS
30GB RAM
4 x 300GB Network Storage
1Gb Network
 

Results

Riak Performance Analysis

Riak Performance Analysis

Key Observations

In Test 3, we're using the same specs in our virtual provider nodes, so the results for the virtual node environment are the same in Test 3 as they are in Test 2. In this Test, the SoftLayer environment substitutes SSD hard drives for the 15K SAS drives used in Test 2, and the throughput numbers show the impact of that improved I/O. The average throughput of the bare metal environment with SSDs is between 1750 and 2000 operations per second. Those numbers are slightly higher than the SoftLayer environment in Test 2, further distancing the bare metal results from the virtual provider results.

The latency of gets for the SoftLayer environment is very difficult to see in this graph because the latency was so low throughout the test. The 99th percentile of puts in the SoftLayer environment settled between 500ms and 625ms, which was a little higher than the bare metal results from Test 2 but still well below the latency from the virtual environment.

Summary

The results show that — similar to the majority of data-centric applications that we have tested — Riak has more consistent, better performing, and lower latency results when deployed onto bare metal instead of a cluster of public cloud instances. The stark differences in consistency of the results and the latency are noteworthy for developers looking to host their big data applications. We compared the 99th percentile of latency, but the mean/median results are worth checking out as well. Look at the mean and median results from the SoftLayer SSD Node environment: For gets, the mean latency was 2.5ms and the median was somewhere around 1ms. For puts, the mean was between 7.5ms and 11ms and the median was around 5ms. Those kinds of results are almost unbelievable (and that's why I've shared everything involved in completing this test so that you can try it yourself and see that there's no funny business going on).

It's commonly understood that local single-tenant resources that bare metal will always perform better than network storage resources, but by putting some concrete numbers on paper, the difference in performance is pretty amazing. Virtualizing on multi-tenant solutions with network attached storage often introduces latency issues, and performance will vary significantly depending on host load. These results may seem obvious, but sometimes the promise of quick and easy deployments on public cloud environments can lure even the sanest and most rational developer. Some applications are suited for public cloud, but big data isn't one of them. But when you have data-centric apps that require extreme I/O traffic to your storage medium, nothing can beat local high performance resources.

-Harold

July 10, 2013

The Importance of Providing Startups a Sandbox

With the global economy in its current state, it's more important than ever to help inspired value-creators acquire the tools needed to realize their ideas, effect change in the world, and create impact — now. I've had the privilege of working with hundreds of young, innovative companies through Catalyst and our relationships with startup accelerators, incubators and competitions, and I've noticed that the best way for entrepreneurs to create change is to simply let them play! Stick them in a sandbox with a wide variety of free products and services that they can use however they want so that they may find the best method of transitioning from idea to action.

Any attention that entrepreneurs divert from their core business ideas is wasted attention, so the most successful startup accelerators build a bridge for entrepreneurs to the resources they need — from access to hosting service, investors, mentors, and corporate partners to recommendations about summer interns and patent attorneys. That all sounds good in theory, and while it's extremely difficult to bring to reality, startup-focused organizations like MassChallenge make it look easy.

During a recent trip to Boston, I was chatting with Kara Shurmantine and Jibran Malek about what goes on behind the scenes to truly empower startups and entrepreneurs, and they gave me some insight. Startups' needs are constantly shifting, changing and evolving, so MassChallenge prioritizes providing a sandbox chock-full of the best tools and toys to help make life easier for their participants ... and that's where SoftLayer helps. With Kara and Jibran, I got in touch with a few MassChallenge winners to get some insight into their experience from the startup side.

Tish Scolnik, the CEO of Global Research Innovation & Technology (GRIT), described the MassChallenge experience perfectly: "You walk in and you have all these amazing opportunities in front of you, and then in a pretty low pressure environment you can decide what you need at a specific moment." Tish calls it a "buffet table" — an array of delectable opportunities, some combination of which will be the building blocks of a startup's growth curve. Getting SoftLayer products and services for free (along with a plethora of other valuable resources) has helped GRIT create a cutting-edge wheelchair for disabled people in developing countries.

The team from Neumitra, a Silver Winner of MassChallenge 2012, chose to use SoftLayer as an infrastructure partner, and we asked co-founder Rob Goldberg about his experience. He explained that his team valued the ability to choose tools that fit their ever-changing and evolving needs. Neumitra set out to battle stress — the stress you feel every day — and they've garnered significant attention while doing so. With a wearable watch, Neumitra's app tells you when your stress levels are too high and you need to take a break.

Jordan Fliegal, the founder and CEO of CoachUp, another MassChallenge winner, also benefited from playing around in the sandbox. This environment, he says, is constantly "giving to you and giving to you and giving to you without asking for anything in return other than that you work hard and create a company that makes a difference." The result? CoachUp employs 20 people, has recruited thousands of judges, and has raised millions in funding — and is growing at breakneck speed.

If you give inspired individuals a chance and then give them not only the resources that they need, but also a diverse range of resources that they could need, you are guaranteed to help create global impact.

In short: Provide a sandbox. Change the world.

-@KelleyHilborn

July 9, 2013

When to Consider Riak for Your Big Data Architecture

In my Breaking Down 'Big Data' – Database Models, I briefly covered the most common database models, their strengths, and how they handle the CAP theorem — how a distributed storage system balances demands of consistency and availability while maintaining partition tolerance. Here's what I said about Dynamo-inspired databases:

What They Do: Distributed key/value stores inspired by Amazon's Dynamo paper. A key written to a dynamo ring is persisted in several nodes at once before a successful write is reported. Riak also provides a native MapReduce implementation.
Horizontal Scaling: Dynamo-inspired databases usually provide for the best scale and extremely strong data durability.
CAP Balance: Prefer availability over consistency
When to Use: When the system must always be available for writes and effectively cannot lose data.
Example Products: Cassandra, Riak, BigCouch

This type of key/value store architecture is very unique from the document-oriented MongoDB solutions we launched at the end of last year, so we worked with Basho to prioritize development of high-performance Riak solutions on our global platform. Since you already know about MongoDB, let's take a few minutes to meet the new kid on the block.

Riak is a distributed database architected for availability, fault tolerance, operational simplicity and scalability. Riak is masterless, so each node in a Riak cluster is the same and contains a complete, independent copy of the Riak package. This design makes the Riak environment highly fault tolerant and scalable, and it also aids in replication — if a node goes down, you can still read, write and update data.

As you approach the daunting prospect of choosing a big data architecture, there are a few simple questions you need to answer:

  1. How much data do/will I have?
  2. In what format am I storing my data?
  3. How important is my data?

Riak may be the choice for you if [1] you're working with more than three terabytes of data, [2] your data is stored in multiple data formats, and [3] your data must always be available. What does that kind of need look like in real life, though? Luckily, we've had a number of customers kick Riak's tires on SoftLayer bare metal servers, so I can share a few of the use cases we've seen that have benefited significantly from Riak's unique architecture.

Use Case 1 – Digital Media
An advertising company that serves over 10 billion ads per month must be able to quickly deliver its content to millions of end users around the world. Meeting that demand with relational databases would require a complex configuration of expensive, vertically scaled hardware, but it can be scaled out horizontally much easier with Riak. In a matter of only a few hours, the company is up and running with an ad-serving infrastructure that includes a back-end Riak cluster in Dallas with a replication cluster in Singapore along with an application tier on the front end with Web servers, load balancers and CDN.

Use Case 2 – E-commerce
An e-commerce company needs 100-percent availability. If any part of a customer's experience fails, whether it be on the website or in the shopping cart, sales are lost. Riak's fault tolerance is a big draw for this kind of use case: Even if one node or component fails, the company's data is still accessible, and the customer's user experience is uninterrupted. The shopping cart structure is critical, and Riak is built to be available ... It's a perfect match.

As an additional safeguard, the company can take advantage of simple multi-datacenter replication in their Riak Enterprise environment to geographically disperse content closer to its customers (while also serving as an important tool for disaster recovery and backup).

Use Case 3 – Gaming
With customers like Broken Bulb and Peak Games, SoftLayer is no stranger to the gaming industry, so it should come as no surprise that we've seen interesting use cases for Riak from some of our gaming customers. When a game developer incorporated Riak into a new game to store player data like user profiles, statistics and rankings, the performance of the bare metal infrastructure blew him away. As a result, the game's infrastructure was redesigned to also pull gaming content like images, videos and sounds from the Riak database cluster. Since the environment is so easy to scale horizontally, the process on the infrastructure side took no time at all, and the multimedia content in the game is getting served as quickly as the player data.

Databases are common bottlenecks for many applications, but they don't have to be. Making the transition from scaling vertically (upgrading hardware, adding RAM, etc.) to scaling horizontally (spreading the work intelligently across multiple nodes) alleviates many of the pain points for a quickly growing database environment. Have you made that transition? If not, what's holding you back? Have you considered implementing Riak?

-@marcalanjones

June 4, 2013

IBM to Acquire SoftLayer

As most have seen by now, this morning we announced IBM's intent to acquire SoftLayer. It's not just big news, it's great news for SoftLayer and our customers. I'd like to take a moment and share a little background on the deal and pass along a few resources to answer questions you may have.

We founded SoftLayer in 2005 with the vision of becoming the de facto platform for the Internet. We committed ourselves to automation and innovation. We could have taken shortcuts to make a quick buck by creating manual processes or providing one-off services, but we invested in processes that would enable us to build the strongest, most scalable, most controllable foundation on which customers can build whatever they want. We created a network-within-a-network topology of three physical networks to every SoftLayer server, and all of our services live within a unified API. "Can it be automated?" was not the easiest question to ask, but it's the question that enabled us to grow at Internet scale.

As part of the newly created IBM Cloud Services division, customers and clients from both companies will benefit from a higher level of choice and a higher level of service from a single partner. More important, the real significance will come as we merge technology that we developed within the SoftLayer platform with the power and vision that drives SmartCloud and pioneer next-generation cloud services. It might seem like everyone is "in the cloud" now, but the reality is that we're still in the early days in this technology revolution. What the cloud looks like and what businesses are doing with it will change even more in the next two years than it has in the last five.

You might have questions in the midst of the buzz around this acquisition, and I want you to get answers. A great place to learn more about the deal is the SoftLayer page on IBM.com. From there, you can access a FAQ with more information, and you'll also learn more about the IBM SmartCloud portfolio that SoftLayer will compliment.

A few questions that may be top of mind for the customers reading this blog:

How does this affect my SoftLayer services?
Between now and when the deal closes (expected in the third quarter of this year), SoftLayer will continue to operate as an independent company with no changes to SoftLayer services or delivery. Nothing will change for you in the foreseeable future.

Your SoftLayer account relationships and support infrastructure will remain unchanged, and your existing sales and technical representatives will continue to provide the support you need. At any time, please don't hesitate to reach out to your SoftLayer team members.

Over time as any changes occur, information will be communicated to customers and partners with ample time to allow for planning and a smooth transition. Our customers will benefit from the combined technologies and skills of both companies, including increased investment, global reach, industry expertise and support available from IBM, along with IBM and SoftLayer's joint commitment to innovation.

Once the acquisition has been completed, we will be able to provide more details.

What does it mean for me?
We entered this agreement because it will enable us to continue doing what we've done since 2005, but on an even bigger scale and with greater opportunities. We believe in its success and the opportunity it brings customers.

It's going to be a smooth integration. The executive leadership of both IBM and SoftLayer are committed to the long-term success of this acquisition. The SoftLayer management team will remain part of the integrated leadership team to drive the broader IBM SmartCloud strategy into the marketplace. And IBM is best-in-class at integration and has a significant track record of 26 successful acquisitions over the past three years.

IBM will continue to support and enhance SoftLayer's technologies while enabling clients to take advantage of the broader IBM portfolio, including SmartCloud Foundation, SmartCloud Services and SmartCloud Solutions.

-@lavosby

UPDATE: On July 8, 2013, IBM completed its acquisition of SoftLayer: http://sftlyr.com/30z

May 29, 2013

Tips from the Abuse Department: To Catch a Predator

We've all seen the emails exclaiming, "THE KING HAS SENT YOU 1,000,000$ US DOLLARS," or "I NEED A PERSONAL ASSISTANT PAYING 500$ A WEEK." Do people actually fall for these? The answer is YES, many do. They think, "What risk is there replying to this email and possibly getting $1,000,000 or even a fraction of that?" As it turns out, there's a lot of risk.

As the senior manager of SoftLayer's abuse department, I know all about these kinds of scams, and I thought I'd reply to one of those emails to show what the interaction usually looks like and explain how the scam works.

---------------------------------------------
From: "Freddy Scammer" <scammer@address>
To: "Freddy Scammer" <scammer@address>
Subject: PA URGENTLY NEEDED

Hi, I am looking for a Personal Assistant, Kindly let me know if you are interested, and i can send you more details. Thank you

Freddy Scammer
---------------------------------------------

First, notice that my address email address isn't listed in the TO field or even the CC field. I must be BCC'd along with many others. I've changed the scammer's fake name to a more fitting name, and I'll use masculine pronouns when I talk about "him." According to our friends over at 419scam.org, this guy has been flagged as a scammer using the same name and email address. The name he provided actually belongs to a company that produces lamps as well as an American historian who focuses on colonization, decolonization and African history.

In the initial message, you'll see that there's no "all or nothing" proposition. Just like any scam, the scammer requests and provides information slowly to reel in a victim.

I replied back:

---------------------------------------------
From: <MY-EMAIL-ADDRESS>
To: <scammer@address>
Subject: RE: PA URGENTLY NEEDED

Doing What?
---------------------------------------------

I wanted to keep it short to see if I could get him to tell me more. He didn't disappoint:

---------------------------------------------
From: Freddy Scammer <scammer@address>
To: <MY-EMAIL-ADDRESS>
Subject: Re: PA URGENTLY NEEDED

Hello

Thanks for your reply, I got your email through the Chamber of Commerce directory. I am looking for someone who can handle my business errands during his or her spare time. I need your service because I am constantly traveling abroad on a missionary trip to build homes for orphaned children and doing other business as we are franchise company into alot of things.

Responsibilities:
1. Receive my mail and drop them off. {Your location doesn't matter as long as you have a post office nearby}
2. Pay my bills.
3. pay our workers on a regular basis

I would have love to meet with you to discuss this job in more detail, but I am currently away on a missionary trip. If you decide to accept the position, please read the employment requirements listed below.
REQUIREMENTS:
A. You are an honest and trustworthy citizen.
B. You need to be able to check your email regular and answer calls.

The pay is $500 weekly and you are entitled to other additional incentives after 1 month if you are hardworking. First, If I were to mail you a payment to
pay people that are needed to and your payment for your service, where would you want it mailed to?

Secondly, how would you like your name to appear on the payment? Note, payment would come in form of Check.

Provide me with the following details below to get started.

Full Name:
Complete Address(No PO Box allowed):
City:
State:
Country:
Zip Code:
Home Phone:
Cell Phone:
Age:
Occupation(If any):
Alternative Email if available:

Awaiting your prompt reply.
---------------------------------------------

Sounds easy enough right? Well it is easy. Who couldn't use an extra $500 a week! But there are a few problems here. If this sounds a lot like a "money mule" (or money laundering) type of situation, that's because it is! A money mule is a person who transfers money acquired illegally (e.g., stolen) in person, through a courier service, or electronically, on behalf of others. The mule is paid for their services, typically a small part of the money transferred.

Money mules are often dupes recruited on-line for what they think is legitimate employment, not aware that the money they are transferring is the product of crime. The money is transferred from the mule's account to the scam operator, typically in another country. Similar techniques are used to transfer illegal merchandise.

After a quick Google search for a few of the sentences in his message, I found out that this guy is low-balling me! He's offering $600 a week in other listings ... I'm hurt! I replied to see if I could get him off script:

---------------------------------------------
From: <MY-EMAIL-ADDRESS>
To: <scammer@address>
Subject: RE: PA URGENTLY NEEDED

So all I have to do is receive packages and re-ship them to where you tell me to,, also receive payments and cash it out and re-pay workers? How will I be paying them, what method? How often will I have to mail packages out and how big are they, who will pay for shipping?
---------------------------------------------

He was quick to respond:

---------------------------------------------
From: Freddy Scammer <scammer@address>
To: <MY-EMAIL-ADDRESS>
Subject: Re: PA URGENTLY NEEDED

Your going to be receiving payment mostly and it has already been paid for, for the shipping . All you have to do is receive and go ahead and cash it ....... Then i will tell you what to do with the money or whoever to pay with it. got me?
---------------------------------------------

Color me amazed. All I have to do is receive a check and cash it?! What luck!

---------------------------------------------
From: <MY-EMAIL-ADDRESS>
To: <scammer@address>
Subject: RE: PA URGENTLY NEEDED
Ok seems easy enough. But I only have a PO BOX, why would this be a problem? I currently don't have a permanent address as I'm staying with a friend trying to get back on my feet and I'm not on the house lease so I can't receive mail here. Is that going to be a problem?
---------------------------------------------

Now none of this is true, but I knew that this would throw Freddy off of his game. Most scammers don't allow a post office box because they don't want to be scammed ... What's to prevent the "victim" from renting a P.O. Box for a month, getting the check, cashing it and cancelling that P.O. Box? That possibility is a risk that scammers don't like to take. There have even been reports that in some instances, the scammers will send goons to your house if you don't hold up your end of the deal.

This whole underground world that you can get quickly and easily sucked into is exciting isn't it?

---------------------------------------------
From: Freddy Scammer <scammer@address>
To: <MY-EMAIL-ADDRESS>
Subject: Re: PA URGENTLY NEEDED

I'm afraid a PO BOX will not suffice, you can perhaps use a family members address and we can start the payments as soon as you send me the info. Please reply with the most urgent intent as I only have a few positions left as my assistant.
---------------------------------------------

At this point, I didn't bother emailing back. It's pretty obvious how easy it could be for someone down on their luck financially (or just bored) to get sucked into this type of scam. What's actually happening here is that the scammer wants to send money from a compromised account to the victim's legit account and then have the victim withdraw 90%-95% of the money and send it to another account that the bad guy has legitimate access to (probably over-seas). The victim would get to keep 5% for their troubles. Often the checks that are sent won't clear, so a victim thinks the funds are in his/her account ... Money is forwarded to the scammer from the victim's legitimate account and it clears before the funds from the scammer's deposited check disappear.

In some instances, scammers will buy high-priced items online with stolen credit card numbers and have those items shipped to the victim's house. The victim will then ship them to a different address. The bad guy has nothing to lose, and the victim takes all the risk.

The challenge with pursuing these scammers from a legal perspective is that they are often based in regions and areas out of the jurisdiction of our law enforcement authorities. As a result, they usually aren't caught, and they just move along to their next unsuspecting victim.

If you receive a "too good to be true" email from someone you don't know, let me spoil the surprise for you: It's not true.

-Dody

Categories: 
May 27, 2013

Tech Wildcatters Pitch Day (From a Unique Perspective)

In a classic scene from Duck Soup, Groucho Marx (as Rufus T. Firefly) is given a report, and he responds, "Why a four-year-old child could understand this report. Run out and find me a four-year-old child. I can't make head or tail out of it." That deadpan line may have come from a movie that was released in 1933, but it alludes to an idea that's relevant to this day: Younger generations have a unique perspective, and their insights can be extremely valuable. James, my nine-year-old son, has a seemingly innate understanding of technology, and after watching TechStars Cloud graduates deliver their demo day pitches last year, he became very interested in startups. I can say this authoritatively because he's been bugging me for month to let him go to another session.

With his school year winding down, I decided I'd make a deal with him: He could join me at the Tech Wildcatters Pitch Day, but he'd have to write a blog about what he learned about each of the companies. When I saw the post he wrote, I realized that having a nine-year-old listen to elevator pitches from startups provides a great barometer for how well a presenter expressed the company's value proposition. I'll turn the floor over to James and let him share what he learned about the eleven companies that presented at #TWPitchDay2013:

Tech Wildcatters Demo Day

Today I went to the Granada Theater in Dallas with my dad to meet start up companies. They were doing presentations to investors to raise money.

My dad did the introduction for HedgeChatter. I really did not understand what the do, but my dad said they did "DID": They turn Data into Information so people can make better Decisions. Not sure what that really means but he seems to like their business.

Here is a quick summary of each of the companies and what they do:

Tech Wildcatters Demo DayVonciergeVoncierge.com@LittleDressBook
Voncierge is a virtual wedding website that lets brides find the time and day for appointments in a short time.

 

Tech Wildcatters Demo DayKlick PushKlickPush.com@KlickPush
Klick Push is redefining online advertising by intersecting it with digital music.

 

Tech Wildcatters Demo DayGroupRaiseGroupRaise.com@GroupRaise
GroupRaise is a platform for charitable organizers to set up fundraisers online at local restaurants.

 

Tech Wildcatters Demo DayScribeSenseScribeSense.com@ScribeSense
ScribeSense is a better way to track and improve student learning. Their online platform grades.

 

Tech Wildcatters Demo DayCrowdFeedCrowdFeed.co@CrowdFeed
CrowdFeed is an app that has a huge market, making music and merchandise available on the spot.

 

Tech Wildcatters Demo DaySmokePhoneSmokePhone.com@SmokePhone
Smokephone is a site that lets you save your ten precious digits from strangers, and then you can delete them at any time.

 

Tech Wildcatters Demo DayHedgeChatterHedgeChatter.com@HedgeChatter
HedgeChatter is a social analytics tool for the stock market. It helps investors make more money in less time (from 12 hours to 6).

 

Tech Wildcatters Demo DaySocialGlimpzSocialGlimpz.com@SocialGlimpz
SocialGlimpz is a market insight tool to glean insights from users and build consumer strategy. It is an alternative to slow, expensive tools in the market.

 

Tech Wildcatters Demo DayTalentizeTalentize.com@Talentize
Talentize is a website that lets DJs, actor, singers, artist, and models showcase themselves for jobs.

 

Tech Wildcatters Demo Day501Fund501Fund.com@501Fund
501Fund is a company that helps with fundraising and saving money.

 

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My favorite of all companies was GroupRaise. I like it because I like helping people, and that is what they do too! Klick Push was great too. They give you prizes like free music for getting to new levels in games. Maybe they can do that for Minecraft.

This is the second time I went to an event like this. Last year I met a lot of cool companies that came to Dallas from San Antonio. My dad said they were part of something called TechStars Cloud. I even presented to them about Steve Jobs. That made me nervous, but it was worth it.

I am already excited about going to my next demo day. And maybe someday I will be on the stage with a new idea.

-James Karidis

Tech Wildcatters Demo Day

May 23, 2013

The Power of the Internet: Breaking into Global Markets

The widespread adoption of smartphones and tablets has dramatically changed the way the world accesses the Internet recent years. Continued declines in smartphone cost will drive penetration even further into economies that have not had the buying power to join the Internet revolution. Over the next decade we'll see this market opportunity explode as these new users come on line. We are seeing the emergence of a new "middle class" being empowered by technology with the latest mobile applications and breakthroughs.

The power of the Internet resides in its ability to transcend borders. Application developers in Indonesia or Vietnam can happily find a virtual home selling into markets in North America without leaving the comfort of their sofas. Economic activity has been westward facing, serving the growing markets in developed nations with near universality of broadband access. Most consumers in developed countries have access to wireline broadband access (DSL, fiber, cable, etc.), while developing nations have suffered from under investment on this front. Much of this access has been driven by an economic imperative: Households in these markets demand fast connections, and they have the disposable income to pay for those connections. Conditions have not been the same in developing nations, but the world is changing.

According to the ITU, there were 4,000 broadband Internet users in Indonesia in 2000. In 2011, there are 2.7 million. The picture starts to get interesting when you consider smartphone penetration. An adsmobi report shows that Indonesia had an estimated 30.7-million smartphone users at the end of 2012, and that number is expected to nearly triple to 81.5 million by 2015. In the eleven-year span between 2000 to 2011, the number of smartphone users in Turkey went from zero to over 7 million. A year later in 2012, that number more than doubled to around 15 million — nearly 20% population penetration. This trend is playing itself out globally, the digital divide is getting smaller and the opportunity to provide service in these markets is getting larger.

What does that mean for you and your business online? You want to capitalize on these burgeoning markets and build your service or application to easily reach a global audience and scale to meet that audience's demand, but that's a pretty daunting task. You need to deliver a seamless experience to millions of users who live thousands of miles away and who may be accessing a completely different Internet than your users down the street.

The idea that large groups of users are accessing a "completely different Internet" may seem like an overly dramatic way to talk about their unique preferences and cultural/language differences, but I use that phrase very literally. As the global allocation of IPv4 addresses dwindles, Internet Service Providers will bring new users online via IPv6 addresses, and those users will only be able to access sites and applications that have IPv6 addresses. IPv6 addresses can run dual-stack with IPv4 addresses — the same content can be delivered via either protocol from the same server — but many legacy hosting providers haven't made the necessary upgrades to make every piece of network hardware IPv6-compatible.

As you consider the challenge of preparing for a global boom in users, keep these suggestions in mind:

  • Leverage a global infrastructure. You might not have the capital to build infrastructure around the world, so look for an IaaS partner that can provide resources in your targeted geographic markets. You need to be able to easily spin up IT resources where and when you need them to meet regional demand.
  • Get close to your end users. Proximity to customers and new markets is vital. You might not be able to host a server next door to every one of your users, but if you can get those users on your network quickly, they'll have the same kind of high-speed access to the content in your closest data center.
  • Don't pay too much. A simple pay-as-you-go service model helps the process of planning and growing strategically. You're able to focus on what you do best while avoiding the pitfalls of managing IT hardware.
  • Prepare for the future. Overarching technology concerns like the one I mentioned about IPv6 might not be very high on your list of priorities because they're just theoretical ... until they're not. By preparing for those future challenges, you'll save yourself a lot of grief when those "future" challenges eventually become "present" challenges.

SoftLayer has 13 data centers strategically located around the world, and we offer the same on-demand provisioning and month-to-month contracts in all of our facilities. We're continuing to build our network infrastructure to bring users onto our network via one of our network Points of Presence (PoPs) within 40 milliseconds from anywhere in the world. Our platform is IPv6-capable, and we have a team of people focused on finding and addressing future technological concerns before they impact our customers.

SoftLayer Global Network Map

To find out more about how your business can go global with SoftLayer, check out our network overview and learn more about what differentiates SoftLayer's data centers from the competition's.

-@quigleymar

May 22, 2013

Catalyst at SXSW 2013: Startup Community Partners

Much of the buzz you've heard about Catalyst has to do with our relationships with the entrepreneurs and startups we support around the world. That buzz is understandable since the hosting, mentorship and networking perks of the program are the most visible aspects of the program, but to truly understand why Catalyst has been so successful, we have to shine the spotlight on our partner organizations in the startup community. Without close ties to the most powerful and successful startup-focused organizations, my team would have a much tougher time meeting and introducing the best and brightest startups to SoftLayer's platform.

When the folks on the Community Development team are not working directly with the companies in the Catalyst, they're looking for opportunities to help and serve our huge network of business incubators, accelerators, co-working spaces and startup events. As a result, we stay pretty busy. To give you an idea of what a given month looks like for us, Catalyst is supporting seventeen different startup-related events in six different countries over the course of the next thirty days. We're lucky that we love what we do so much ... Otherwise, that schedule might seem pretty daunting.

If you've been an avid SoftLayer Blog reader (as you should be), you know that we work closely with organizations like TechStars and 500 Startups, but you haven't heard much about the other types of partnerships we build in the startup community. We want to provide Catalyst companies with resources outside of hosting that can make their lives easier, and that means we have to find killer partners that focus specifically on the needs and wants of startup companies. To give you an idea of what those partners look like, I'd like to introduce you to a few of them via their video interviews from SoftLayer's Catalyst Startup Lounge at SXSW:

As we've done with the Startups Speak interviews, we'll be adding videos from our partners to the YouTube playlist above so that you can meet them and learn more about the value they uniquely provide to the startup community.

I'd love to take more time to explain how we incorporate services from these partners in the Catalyst program, but I think I'm late for a plane to Vancouver ... or Chicago ... or New York ... or San Francisco. In any case, I should probably head to the airport.

-@PaulFord

May 15, 2013

Secure Quorum: Tech Partner Spotlight

We invite each of our featured SoftLayer Tech Marketplace Partners to contribute a guest post to the SoftLayer Blog, and this week, we’re happy to welcome Gerard Ibarra from Secure Quorum. Secure Quorum is an easy-to-use emergency notification system and crisis management system that resides in the cloud.

Are You Prepared for an Emergency?

Every company's management team faces the challenge of having too many things going on with not enough time in the day. It's difficult to get everything done, so when push comes to shove, particular projects and issues need to be prioritized to be completed. What do we have to do today that can't be put off to tomorrow? Often, a businesses fall into a reactionary rut where they are constantly "putting out the fires" first, and while it's vital for a business to put out those fires (literal or metaphorical), that approach makes it difficult to proactively prepare for those kinds of issues to streamline the process of resolving them. Secure Quorum was created to provide a simple, secure medium to deal with emergencies and incidents.

What we noticed was that businesses didn't often consider planning for emergencies as part of their operations. The emergencies I'm talking about thankfully don't happen often, but fires, accidents, power outages, workplace violence and denial of service attacks can severely impact the bottom line if they aren't addressed quickly ... They can make or break you. Are you prepared?

Every second that we fail to make informed and logical decisions during an emergency is time lost in taking action. Take these facts for a little perspective:

  • "Property destruction and business disruption due to disasters now rival warfare in terms of loss." (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)
  • More than 10,000 severe thunderstorms, 2,500 floods, 1,000 tornadoes and 10 hurricanes affect the United States each year. On average, 500 people die yearly because of severe weather and floods. (National Weather News 2005)
  • The cost of natural disasters is rising. During the past two decades, natural disaster damage costs have exceeded the $500 billion mark. Only 17 percent of that figure was covered by insurance. (Dennis S. Mileti, Disasters by Design)
  • Losses as a result of global disasters continue to increase on average every year, with an estimated $360 billion USD lost in 2011. (Centre for Research in the Epidemiology of Disasters)
  • Natural disasters, power outages, IT failures and human error are common causes of disruptions to internal and external communications. They "can cause downtime and have a significant negative impact on employee productivity, customer retention, and the confidence of vendors, partners, and customers." (Debra Chin, Palmer Research, May 2011)

These kinds of "emergencies" are not going away, but because specific emergencies are difficult (if not impossible) to predict, it's not obvious how to deal with them. How do we reduce risk for our employees, vendors, customers and our business? The two best answers to that question are to have a business continuity plan (BCP) and to have a way to communicate and collaborate in the midst of an emergency.

Start with a BCP. A BCP is a strategic plan to help identify and mitigate risk. Investopedia gives a great explanation:

The creation of a strategy through the recognition of threats and risks facing a company, with an eye to ensure that personnel and assets are protected and able to function in the event of a disaster. Business continuity planning (BCP) involves defining potential risks, determining how those risks will affect operations, implementing safeguards and procedures designed to mitigate those risks, testing those procedures to ensure that they work, and periodically reviewing the process to make sure that it is up to date.

Make sure you understand the basics of a BCP, and look for cues from organizations like FEMA for examples of how to approach emergency situations: http://www.ready.gov/business-continuity-planning-suite.

Once you have a basic BCP in place, it's important to be able to execute it when necessary ... That's where an emergency communication and collaboration solution comes into play. You need to streamline how you communicate when an emergency occurs, and if you're relying on a manual process like a phone tree to spread the word and contact key stakeholders in the midst of an incident, you're wasting time that could better be spent focusing to the issue at hand. An emergency communication solution automates that process quickly and logically.

When you create a BCP, you consider which people in your organization are key to responding to specific types of emergencies, and if anything ever happens, you want to get all of those people together. An emergency communication system will collect the relevant information, send it to the relevant people in your organization and seamlessly bridge them into a secured conference call. What would take minutes to complete now takes seconds, and when it comes to responding to these kinds of issues, seconds count. With everyone on a secure call, decisions can be made quickly and recorded to inform employees and stakeholders of what occurred and what the next steps are.

Plan for emergencies and hope that you never have to use that plan. Think about preparing for emergencies strategically, and it could make all the difference in the world. Secure Quorum is a platform that makes it easy to communicate and collaborate quickly, reliably and securely in those high-stress situations, so if you're interested getting help when it comes to responding to emergencies and incidents, visit our site at SecureQuorum.com and check out the whitepaper we just published with one of our customers: Ease of Use: Make it Part of Your Software Decision.

-Gerard Ibarra, CEO of Secure Quorum

This guest blog series highlights companies in SoftLayer's Technology Partners Marketplace.
These Partners have built their businesses on the SoftLayer Platform, and we're excited for them to tell their stories. New Partners will be added to the Marketplace each month, so stay tuned for many more come.
May 14, 2013

Interop 2013 - SoftLayer + Supermicro Server Challenge II

The SoftLayer team visited Las Vegas for Interop 2013, and attendees from around the world stopped by our booth to take on the infamous Server Challenge II. The challenge was completed more than two hundred and fifty times with an average time of 1:31.34.

The Server Challenge II "Hall of Fame" was particularly competitive at Interop 2013. Only 8 seconds separated our first place finisher from tenth place:

Interop Server Challenge

Jim Chrapowicz recorded the competition-winning time of 58.40 seconds (after a 5-second penalty for not closing one of the latches), edging out the second place time by a razor-thin margin of less than two tenths of a second. For his Server Challenge II heroics, Jim is being rewarded with the MacBook Air grand prize, and everyone who made the top ten list will be receiving $25 iTunes gift cards. Here's video of the winning completion:

Take a look at some of the other action from the show floor:

Interop Server Challenge

Interop Server Challenge

Interop Server Challenge

Interop Server Challenge

About the Server Challenge II

The Server Challenge II is a race to reassemble a scaled-down version of a SoftLayer server rack. Participants are tasked with repopulating the drive bays of two 2U Supermicro servers and plugging 18 network cables into network switches. The competition provides conference attendees with a fun opportunity to get hands-on with the servers and network gear that fuel SoftLayer's global cloud infrastructure platform. For more information about the Server Challenge II, check out "Server Challenge II: How SoftLayer Saves the World."

About SoftLayer

SoftLayer operates a global cloud infrastructure platform built for Internet scale. Spanning 13 data centers in the United States, Asia and Europe and a global footprint of network points of presence, SoftLayer's modular architecture provides unparalleled performance and control, with a full-featured API and sophisticated automation controlling a flexible unified platform that seamlessly spans physical and virtual devices, and a global network for secure, low-latency communications. With 100,000 devices under management, SoftLayer is the largest privately held Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) provider in the world with a portfolio of leading-edge customers from Web startups to global enterprises. For more information, visit softlayer.com.

About Supermicro

Supermicro, the leading innovator in high-performance, high-efficiency server technology is a premier provider of advanced server Building Block Solutions for Data Center, Cloud Computing, Enterprise IT, Hadoop/Big Data, HPC and Embedded Systems worldwide. Supermicro is committed to protecting the environment through its "We Keep IT Green" initiative and provides customers with the most energy-efficient, environmentally-friendly solutions available on the market. For more information, visit supermicro.com.

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