August 6, 2009

Punishing Success

Let’s say you worked for years to become a world class athlete. As a kid, you were in the gym while other athletes were at the movies. You were in the weight room on Saturday nights when no one else was there. You shunned pizza and soda in favor of grilled fish and fresh fruit. By the time Letterman hit the evening airwaves, you were well into restorative sleep. You were out the door for your morning runs while other athletes snoozed. As a result of all this, now you perform at an elite level and are very successful at your sport. Suddenly, you find that there are people who have a vested interest in helping you maximize your athletic potential. Your coaches, your managers, and companies who pay you to endorse their products all want to see you do your best. Why? Because doing your best helps them be more successful.

So, they provide you with all the things you need to maximize your potential. You get the best training gear and training regimens. You get the best nutrition. You get the right amount of rest. All these things help you maximize your potential. Thus the relationship is a nice symbiotic cycle – the more success you experience, the more success your coaches, managers, and endorsement companies experience. Win-win. Makes sense, right?

So, imagine the silliness if your coaches, managers, etc., made the decision that because you were so fortunate in your success that you had to “give back” almost half your resources to train the athletes who loafed, stayed out late, partied and gorged on pizza. Because you’re such a hard-working and smart athlete, you don’t need all those resources to participate adequately in your sport, they rationalize. Consequently, you don’t hit your potential, your coaches and managers don’t distinguish themselves, and endorsing companies don’t call you. You then feel that you’ve been punished for your hard work and success.

Sadly, much of our government policy falls under this flawed logic. The IRS just released their latest income tax stats for the year 2007. For that year the top 1% of earners paid 40.4% of all income taxes collected. We all know that right now we’re coming out of a recession and we really folks to invest in businesses and hire people to get the economy moving. So how do the 2007 numbers compare to, say, the 1980’s? During the ‘80’s, we managed to shake off the “stagflation” of the ‘70’s and get the economy rolling again. It was during this time that many technology juggernaut companies were spawned – Microsoft being a good example. So, how much of the income taxes in the ‘80’s were paid by the top 1% of earners? The average for the 10 years from 1980-1989 was 22.2%.

Let’s do some quick math. $1.116 trillion in income taxes was collected in 2007. Of that, $455.3 billion was paid by the top 1% of earners. If they paid 22.2% as in the ‘80’s, they would have paid $247.8 billion in taxes, and right now we’d have $207.5 billion MORE dollars invested in our economy. That would be quite a stimulus package! Our current policy punishes success and chokes off fuel from our economic engines while we’re trying to climb out of a worse recession than we had in the ‘70’s. Not smart.

Some may think that this would simply mean that our government deficit would be $207.5 billion higher. This is not the case at all. These folks that make up that top 1% didn’t get there by being lazy or not putting their money to work. I know some folks in that group, and they WANT to put their money to work! I know one gentleman who had to be told some legal docs for a deal could not be prepared over the weekend because Christmas was on that weekend. These folks are like the world class athlete I mentioned above – by and large they’re disciplined and hard-working. Their money will build new businesses and create more jobs, and the government will collect far more revenue from this new economic activity than it would give up in collections from these top 1% folks. Think about it – how many of us have ever been hired by a “poor” person? Instead of punishing economic success, we should encourage it!

Bottom line, if government policy were to make sense, it would encourage these folks to maximize their economic potential and find the correct balance of revenue to collect and yet still promote economic growth. What would we prefer? That the government collects 50% of $1 trillion or 30% of $2 trillion? Hint: 30% of $2 trillion is a WAY better deal.

At SoftLayer, we think very differently about things. We simply do not punish our customers for succeeding. We empower them to be more successful – why? Because if our customers succeed, we succeed. We get this.

Can we prove this? Perhaps a look at how customers vote with their feet is an indicator. For the past few months, SoftLayer has seen the lowest percentage of customers terminating business with us in our history. If we punished our customers for their success, they would go elsewhere.

August 5, 2009

SLales Motivation 101

We have a pretty good sales team here at SoftLayer, quite honestly I couldn’t ask for a better group than the one we have.  It’s pretty common for us to have various sales contests and awards to keep the team motivated and focused in the right direction, however last month I decided to try something a little different.  Lance and I set a pretty lofty sales goal for the team (one I didn’t really think they would achieve), and told them that if they reached the goal I would shave my head completely bald.

As the month progressed, I began to realize the genius of this contest.  The team was focused, driven by the desire to see their boss publically humiliated.  SLales worked extra hours, came in early, stayed late, made calls, sent emails, followed up every lead, they did everything possible to exceed the goal.  Looking back on it as their manager, it was a beautiful thing to watch and I’ve never been more proud of my team.

It ended up being close (down to the final hours on Friday actually).  However, SLales stepped up to the plate and met the challenge.  They worked together like a well oiled machine and overcame numerous obstacles, with the singular vision of seeing their boss embarrassed.  They succeeded as a team, and here is the payoff:

August 3, 2009


Attending College Classes can be a daunting task. The hours of homework and studying (and the obligatory time spent actually in the classroom) can noticeably eat away at one’s free time (and at times, their sanity). While it can be painful to take on college, attending classes and working on top of it can be exponentially more difficult. Balancing your studies with your responsibilities at work can be tricky, even for those who are experts in time management. When all is said and done, though, the investment is well worth it. As I’ve stated before, Knowledge is power (yes, I know, shameless self promotion), and learning can occur at any opportunity.

I recently realized that with the exception for while sleeping (some days I can count the hours on one hand), I am always learning new things. While my progressing college education keeps me thinking, SoftLayer has taught me more than I ever thought I would learn in such a short amount of time. New operating systems (at least to me), and continual changes and improvements are synonymous with life at SL. Learning occurs at every customer request, every server build, and every operating system install. Certainly, employment here is not for the faint of heart. More so, no one can say that they didn’t leave their shift just a bit smarter than when they arrived.

Knowledge is important in this industry, as knowing the correct process to solve a problem can mean the difference between five hours and five minutes of downtime. While everyone has their strengths, the team that we have here supersedes any possible weaknesses, leading to one of the brightest group of individuals anyone could have the privilege of working with. I spend my shifts perpetually challenged, but never overwhelmed by the sheer magnitude of issues (read: learning opportunities) that present themselves every day. While I will concede that classes such as precalculus and humanities may not directly sharpen my troubleshooting skills, being able to think logically and follow procedures will certainly pay off in the long run.

July 27, 2009

Cool Tool: find

Have you ever gotten an e-mail from your server that a particular partition is filling up? Unfortunately, the e-mails don't usually tell you where the big files are hiding.

You can determine this and many other handy things by using the Unix utility 'find'. I use the 'find' command all the time in both my work at SoftLayer and also for running some sites that I manage outside of work. Being able to find the files owned by a particular user can be handy.

The 'find' command takes as arguments various tests to run on the files and directories that it scans. Just running 'find' with no arguments is going to list out the files and directories under your current location. Real power comes from using the different switches in various combinations.

find /some/path -name "myfile*" -perm 700

This format of the command will search for items within /some/path that have names starting with the string 'myfile' and also have the permission value of 700 (rwx------).

find /some/path -type f -size +50M

Find files that are larger than 50MB. The '-type f' argument tells find to only look for files.

find /some/path -type f -size +50M -ctime -7

Find files that are larger than 50MB and that have been created in the last seven days.

find /some/path -type f -size +50M -ctime -7 -exec ls -l {} \;

The -exec tells find to run some command against each match that it finds. In this case, it is going to run an 'ls -l'. Moves, removes and even custom full scripts are doable as well.

There are many, many more arguments that are possible for 'find'. Refer to the man pages for find on your particular flavor of Unix server to see all the different options for the command. As with all shell commands, know what you are running. Given the chance 'find' will wipe out anything it can ( via -exec rm {}, for example).

July 22, 2009

Turning Fantasy Into Reality

I remember when I first started here at SoftLayer it was quite exciting and nerve racking at the same time.  You see I came from the telecom industry, and I worked for a huge company that had 100,000+ employees.  Basically, I did the same thing everyday.  I learned a lot when I first joined this huge company, but I felt like my career had become stagnant and I needed a change.  I decided to look for a job at a small company and be challenged everyday.  Man, did I find the perfect job!!!  Anyway, back to the point.  At first, I didn't realize how advanced SoftLayer was till I began to look more into the company and the industry we are in.  The more I dug the more I was impressed and excited to be a part of something revolutionary.

I know we all have seen the movie "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" (old school version) or at least most of us.  I know it sounds cheesy but  that is the best way to describe how I felt when I first joined.  I felt like Charlie.  I was just amazed to see what I saw inside the workings of SoftLayer.  I had no idea that some of the tools/services/automation SoftLayer had done was even possible.  The best way for me to describe the management  of SoftLayer is they are the Willie Wonka's of our industry.  Some people may think SoftLayer's ideas are radical or even impossible, but we don't.  All the great people here at SoftLayer work together to make the impossible possible.

While other companies try to mimic us, we are busy turning fantasies into realities.

July 20, 2009


So here I sit cramped in a seat built for a 10 year old on American flight 1492 from New Orleans to Dallas. There isn’t enough room left for a marshmallow I bet. Yep, I am thankful I just left the site of the Microsoft WPC 2009 where I had to do a little booth duty and mingle with some folks that run the coolest companies out there. The show seemed a little different this year. Last year the recession was just getting going and gaining some steam. The big companies still had previously budgeted money to burn and were doing just that. They had very large booths and better swag and Microsoft rented Minute Maid Park in Houston and threw quite the party. This year was noticeably different. I would bet that over 50% of the people that came by our booth were international which tells me that US companies are still cutting back. One very large US Company wasn’t even at the show and they were a flagship last year. One of our much larger competitors was barely existent, a flyer here a business card there and most other companies had much smaller booths and the swag was just not quite as enticing. Thankfully my kids like anything so they will still be extremely happy with the 3 bags of stuff I was able to round up. I am thankful that SoftLayer was able to hand out just over 1000 cool SoftLayer Frisbees (boomers to our international friends) and 200 cooler bags. The boomers were a great hit at the show and as far as I know no one lost an eye in the process of handing them out. Microsoft still put on a great show and “The Party” at the House of Blues was really cool. I just wish one year they would actually send me the email so I could get the wristband instead of standing in the slacker line.

Enter the ton of bricks that hit me. I am extremely thankful and 99% percent sure, no wait, I am 100% sure that I work for the coolest and one of the fastest growing companies out there. Thankfully after a week of spreading the word about SoftLayer I am on this flight back home. Thankful the pilot knows how to fly and land this jet. Thankful the flight attendant just gave me some lukewarm orange juice. Thankful I remembered to take my laptop out of the bag I checked this time but still managed to leave my cell phone in the checked bag! I am off my leash!

Ok so back to my subject.

I am Thankful this is almost my 2 year anniversary at SoftLayer. Thankful the guys that started this place and the great minds they have added along the way are really running a top notch company. Thankful that I wake up every day excited about my company and my role, thankful that SoftLayer lives within our means, and thankful the things we spend money on are for one thing, to make our product better and our customers happy. Thankful we do not waste on the posh extras that some other companies brag about. Thankful that once a customer tries us out and understands what our system is capable of they rarely ever leave. Thankful SoftLayer has great punch and people drink it regularly with pride, both customers and employees alike. Thankful that our products have the ability to help struggling companies in this down economy and we continue to grow because of it. Thankful we are setting sales records and our churn rates are much lower than this time last year. Thankful word is spreading on how we can let a company hold on to their capital for other expenditures and simply pay monthly for their IT needs on demand. Thankful we have a plan and we stick to it. Thankful we know what we are great at and don’t try to be everything to everyone wasting countless hours complicating our business plan. Thankful I can sleep at night knowing I am at a stable company and I don’t have the worries that many people in our country have during this recession. I wish everyone affected by the recession a fruitful second half of the year and hope that everyone can start recovering from the current hardships.

Oh and I am thankful that the flight attendant has moved along to the folks behind me and is finally finished booty bumping me every 3 seconds and thankful we are 45 minutes from DFW!

And I know…… you are thankful……. that this blog is ending……. Thanks for reading…….thankfully……

July 17, 2009


As you may have noticed from a previous blog a while back, we here at SoftLayer really like Whataburger quite a bit. For those of you not lucky enough to live in the southern part of the US, Whataburger has a chain of hamburger restaurants that started in Texas but now stretches across the south from Florida to Arizona. For the record, their breakfast taquitos and hamburgers are second to none.

Every so often Whataburger runs an ad that states there are over 34,000 different ways that you can order your Whataburger. Every time I see this ad it makes me wonder, how many possible ways can you order a server with SoftLayer? I’ve always said to myself “one day I will calculate this and write a blog about it”, but I never seemed to get around to it until now. My ultimate motivation to complete this calculation came while discussing our “perceived” limited configuration options with a customer due to having a set of “standard” solutions.

As I started to research the math involved in this calculation, I quickly realized that the total number of combinations for all servers and services we offer would be too much to comprehend or calculate. Therefore I limited the scope to just options for a Nehalem processor server. I also enlisted the help of Greg Kinman, one of our interns, to help me with the math to make sure we got it right. Those Kinmans are multiplying around here (almost as fast as the configuration options)…

Greg calculated that there are 96,631,664,476,185,600,000 different ways to order a Nehalem server. That’s 97 quintillion possibilities for just one server when you take into account the various hardware, software, and service options! Once you start to consider ALL the server options and cloud instances offered, it seems to me that unlimited would be a better description for the configurations SoftLayer offers.

Greg, I owe you lunch for helping me with the calculations today. How about Whataburger?

July 15, 2009

Subjecting Subjectivity To Math

I recently read an article about an endeavor that is currently being undertaken to develop a “Speech Analysis Algorithm Crafted to Detect and Help Dissatisfied Customers”. In short, a team of engineers are hoping to create software that will recognize when a caller is becoming stressed and immediately phone a manager to alert them of a developing situation. Wow! It is rare that you would see math and science applied to something that is so subjective. After all, math is used to quantify and measure things all based on a known or a baseline. In this particular effort, I would surmise that the team of engineer’s most difficult task will be to determine how to establish a unique baseline for each unique call and caller. Once upon a time as a student of Electrical Engineering, I took on my share of convolution integrals and that’s a path that I do not care to venture down again. I’ve also taken on my share of convoluted customer calls in a past life and witnessed our frontline assisting customers in complex situations here at SoftLayer.

Until there is such an application that can detect and address a conversation that may be heading in the wrong direction, we have to rely on good ole’ training and experience. With each call and query, the baseline is reset. I’d even go further to say that with each exchange; the baseline is reset as our Customer Service Agents seek information to get to the root of the issue. It’s not hard to imagine the frustration that can build in a back-and-forth conversation as two people look to come to a solution or an amiable conclusion just as it is understandable that sometimes, a customer may simply need to vent. How do you calculate and anticipate those scenarios?

I wish much success to the team involved in the customer service speech analysis program. And programmatically speaking, I see many CASE, SWITCH, FOR, WHILE, BREAK, CONTINUE, IF, ELSE, ELSE IF, NEXT statements in your future. Good Luck!

July 13, 2009

What a View!

I can easily define myself as the crazy one up in the Seattle Datacenter. I like to ride dirt bikes, street bikes, go fast on the water, ride in small airplanes, I could go on and on how my co-workers (and friends/family) may think I am crazy when it comes to Adventures.

What can I say, I like a challenging experience.

One of those challenging experiences is working at SoftLayer, always preparing to be ahead of the rest in this industry, we're constantly learning new technologies and taking leaps and bounds. That is the reason why I love my job so much, we're always working with the latest and greatest, learning new stuff. Speaking of leaps and bounds, I finally did something the other day I have always wanted too. I signed up for an Advance Free Fall Skydive class and jumped out of a Cessna at 13,000 feet. Free falling at terminal speeds towards the earth, At 12,000 feet I mock pulled my parachute 3 times, so the instructors who where both holding onto me by their hands only could see I learned what to do. 6000 ft came, I locked onto my altimeter, 5500 I waived hands off to the instructors and they deployed below me, and I pulled my rip cord. That all happened in about 50 seconds after leaping out of the plane. For the next 8 minutes I saw the best view in Western Washington I have ever seen. One of the thoughts that came to my mind is the only thing to relate to how I have ever thought something was this nice, was the first time I walked into a SoftLayer Datacenter and admired how well thought out and nice it was.

I'm glad to say 19 months into this job and being part of the Operations team in Seattle, I walk in each day to the datacenter and can say the same thing day in and day out. Let's hope I can say the same thing about my second jump in a few weeks.

July 10, 2009

The Kinmans are Taking Over

Yeah, it’s official…we have another one: me, even though I’m only a summer intern. The day after my 16th birthday couldn’t have been a better opportunity for me to begin my quest for company domination. Well, I think that will come later.

Anyway, it is my first job at my first company, ever. Softlayer’s really nice. They paid me one hour’s wages for sitting in a conference room and filling out a frightening mountain of paperwork (OK, well, maybe it was more like 5 or 6 forms), and again another day for visiting a few datacenter rooms in the Infomart (I think it was compensation for hearing damage from the noise in the rooms). Michael Scott would have scoffed and turned his empty pockets inside out. Anyway, my point is to tell you that the Kinman clan is taking over Softlayer.

Yep, you got that right.

Steve has 4 kids who will probably grow up and get promoted to manage some section of the company each. Gary’s kid (me) already has a spot, and I’m up to my ears in details about servers, processors, RAM, disk drives, routers, switches, fiber, etc. Heck, maybe Mama Carol and Papa Willie will come back out of retirement to work here too. Oh and Steve’s wife and my mom and…well, you get the idea. If your name is Kinman, you’re gonna work at Softlayer, whether you like it or not.

Someday, you’re gonna wake up in some kind of cubicle in a building on International Parkway and you’re gonna wonder how the heck you ended up there. And HR is just gonna tell you, “Well…your last name IS Kinman…” They may have to stop paying us to fill out forms to keep from going bankrupt because there’s gonna be so many of us. With that in mind, I’d say that the average current non-Kinman Softlayer employee has about three years, plus-or-minus, before the co-worker next to them is, you guessed it, a Kinman. Wow. Congrats Carol and Willie.

…just kidding. But speculation is fun, right? Until it actually happens. Muahahahahaha.


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