serverchallenge

November 12, 2014

HTML5 – Back to Basics with a Strong Foundation Pt. 2

After a small throwback post of my original Tips and Tricks – jQuery Select2 blog for our #T4 series, and posting a CSS Blog about Mastering Multiple Backgrounds, it’s time I came back around and finished the HTML5 – Back to Basics with a Strong Foundation series with Part 2!

I highly recommend reading part one of the series. I outlined many HTML5 techniques that had never been possible with anything but Flash or jQuery before. In this blog I’ll continue with additional techniques that I couldn’t fit into the first blog.

I stand by my previous statement that if we forget what we’ve done and scripted for over two decades with previous versions of HTML and return to the basics with HTML5, we can re-learn a whole new foundation that is sure to make us stronger developers and smarter engineers.

IV. No More Declaring Types!

The sole purpose to develop better scripting and tagging languages is to improve efficiency. I think we can all agree that a smarter language should be able to detect certain attributes and tags automatically . . . well now, HTML5 has taken a huge step toward this.

Now <scripts> and <links> can be FREE of the type attribute!

  • Instead of:
  • <link type=”text/css” rel=”stylesheet” href=”css/stylesheet.css” />

    Or

    <script type=”text/javascript” src=”js/javascript.js”></script>

  • We can now just simply declare:
  • <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”css/stylesheet.css” />

    And

    <script src=”js/javascript.js”></script>

Something so little . . . yet so awesome!

V. SEMANTICS! Well . . . partial semantics anyway!

HTML5 supports some semantic tags—the most popular being the header and footers.

No longer do we have to write:

<div id=”header”>
    <h1>Header Content</h1>
</div>
<div id=”footer”>
    <h1>Footer Content</h1>
</div>

Now, with semantic Headers and Footers, we can simply do:

<header>
    <h1>Header Content</h1>
</header>
<footer>
    <h1>Footer Content</h1>
</footer>

Whoo! That’s an AWESOME change. Of course there could be a LOT more semantic changes, but we all know those will be coming soon! Until then, we can enjoy what we have.

VI. Video Support without Third-Party Plugins

Many browsers are jumping on board with providing support for the <video> tag, which allows native playback of videos. Gone are the days of having to use javascript/jQuery or *shudder* Flash to embed videos into your pages.

Check this out:

<video controls preload>
    <source src="myVideo.ogv" type="video/ogg; codecs='vorbis, theora'" />
    <source src="myVideo.mp4" type="video/mp4; 'codecs='avc1.42E01E, mp4a.40.2'" />
    <p> Your browser is way too old. <a href="myVideo.mp4">Download instead.</a> </p>
</video>

You’ll notice there are TWO <source> tags; this is because browsers like IE and Safari have already started supporting advanced video formats such as mp4. Firefox and Chrome are still in the process, but for now we still need to provide ogv/ogg videos. It’s only a matter of time before all the browsers will support mp4, but this is definitely a huge step forward from third-party plugins!

You should also notice there are two attributes listed in the <video> tag: controls and preload. Controls embed native video playback controls in the video player while preload allows the video to be preloaded, which is GREAT if you have a page just dedicated to viewing the video.

Thanks for tuning in, and let us know what YOUR favorite new features of HTML5 are! And if you’re interested in a gaming series with HTML5, holla at us, and I’ll get on it! I’ve been dying to write a blog series dedicated to teaching HTML5 gaming with the <canvas> tag!

-Cassandra

November 11, 2014

Which storage solution is best for your project?

Before building applications around our network storage, here’s a refresher on what network storage is, how it is used, the different types available, and the best uses for each.

What is network storage? Why would you use it?

Appropriately named, network storage is storage attached to a server over our network; not to be confused with directly attached storage (DAS), which is a hard drive located in the server (or connected with a device like a SCSI or USB cable). Although DAS transfers data to a server faster than network storage due to network latency and system caching, there is still a strong place for network storage.

Many different servers can access network storage, and with some network storage solutions, more than one server can get data from the same shared storage volume simultaneously. This comes in handy if one server dies, because another can pick up a storage device and start where the first left off.

With DAS, planned downtime for server upgrades, potential data loss, and provisioning larger or more servers can slow down productivity. The physical constraints of internal drives and costs associated with servers do not affect network storage.

Because SoftLayer manages the disk space of our network storage products, there’s no need to worry about rebuilding a redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAIDs) or failed disks. If a disk fails, SoftLayer automatically replaces it and rebuilds the RAID—in most cases you would be unaware that the changes occurred.

Select network storage solutions are available with tools for your important data. Schedule snapshots of your data, promote snapshots to full volumes, or reset your data to the snapshot point.

And with network storage, downtime is minimal. Disaster recovery tools available on select storage solutions let you send a command to quickly fail over to a different data center so you can access your data if our network is ever down in a data center.

Types of Network Storage And How They Are Different

Storage Area Network (SAN) or Block Storage

Block storage works like DAS, just remotely—only a single server can access a block storage volume at a time. Using an Internet small computer system interface (iSCSI) protocol over a secure transmission control protocol/Internet protocol (TCP/IP) connection, SoftLayer's block storage has excellent features for backup and disaster recovery, and adding snapshot schedules and failover redundancy make it a powerful enterprise solution.

Network Attached Storage (NAS) or File Storage

File storage acts like a remote file system. It has a slim operating system that allows servers to treat it like a remote directory structure. Multiple servers can share files on the same storage simultaneously. Our new consistent performance storage lets you share files quickly and easily using a network file system (NFS) with your choice of performance level and secure connections.

We also have a common Internet file system (CIFS) (Windows), which requires a credential that grants access to any server on our private network. File storage can only be accessed by SoftLayer servers.

Object Storage

Object storage is a standalone storage entity with its own representational state transfer (REST) API that grants applications (not operating systems) access to the files stored there. Located on a public network, servers in any of our data centers can directly access files stored there. Object storage is different in the way those files are stored as well. In object storage there is not a directory structure, but instead metadata tags are used to categorize and search for files. In conjunction with a content delivery network (CDN), you can quickly serve files to your users or to a mobile device in close proximity.

With pay-as-you-go pricing, you don’t have to worry about running out of space. We only charge based on the greatest usage in any given day. That means you can get started right now for free!

Which storage solution is best for your project?

If you are still confused about which network storage option you should build your applications around, take this eight-question quiz to find out if object, file or block storage will work best for you:

-Kevin

November 6, 2014

#T4 -Tips and Tricks - Pure CSS Sticky Footers

Who doesn’t like a walk down memory lane? In our #T4 series, SoftLayer brings back popular tech tip blog posts. #ThrowbackThursday #T4 #ThrowbackThursdayTechTips

Sticky footers are still landing developers in, well, sticky situations. Don’t fret—we’ve all been there. We’re bumping our popular Tips and Tricks – Pure CSS Sticky Footers blog post that was originally posted two years ago today!

Our objective is simple: Make the footer of our web page stay at the bottom even if the page's content area is shorter than the user's browser window. We got a LOT of feedback the first time this blog was posted, a lot of you loved it, and some of you brought to my attention that some browser environments didn’t support this method.

For this throwback, I have modified the code (the HTML and the CSS), but as you can see, not by too much, only a few things have changed. This method uses the: after attribute, which in my opinion is a LOT cooler. This should help those of you who could not get the previous method to work as this utilizes more of a modern technique and has a lot more universal compatibility!

So enjoy!

Go from this:

CSS Footer

To this:

CSS Footer

  1. Start by getting the HTML structure in place first:
    <div id="page">
     
          <div id="header"> </div>
     
          <div id="main"> </div>
    </div> <!-- /page -->
     
    <div id="footer"> </div>
  2. Then code the CSS for the full page:
    * {
          margin: 0;
     
    html, body {
     
          height: 100%;
    }
  3. Code the rest as:
    #page {
          min-height: 100%;
          margin-bottom: -100px; /* equal to the fixed height of your footer */
    }
     
    #page:after {
          content: “”;
          display:block;
    }
     
     
    #footer, #page:after {
          height: 100px;
    }
  4. For Internet Explorer to not throw a fit, we need concede that IE doesn't recognize min-height as a valid property, so we have to add Height: 100%; to #page:
    #page {
          Min-height: 100%;  /* for all other browsers */
          height: 100%;  /* for IE */
          position:relative;
    }

To read my FAVORITE perk of this trick: check out the original post here.

For questions, comments, or just feel like chatting, contact us at social@softlayer.com.

-Cassandra

November 4, 2014

Cloud Conversations Ruled at the SoftLayer Asia Roadshow

Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta, Bangkok, Singapore, & Hong Kong

For those who couldn’t make it to one of the sessions, here are some of the highlights from our Kick aaS five-city SoftLayer whirlwind tour. For the scoop on the entire event, check out the first Asia Roadshow blog.

We met with amazing startups, developers, and entrepreneurs during our technical workshops who were all eager to explore, grow, and exploit cloud computing to its full capacity. We talked about industry best practices and global trending use cases.

It’s so exciting to see the tech community interested in the cloud adoption in Asia and where and how it’s taking today’s businesses!

Tales From #SLAsiaRoadshow

Harold Smith, director of sales engineering at SoftLayer (@Hslmith), kick started the workshops with an introduction to SoftLayer’s cloud infrastructure and business model. He discussed: the security of private clouds, the applicability of auto-scaling, tagging virtual servers, assigning static IPs, moving workloads between onsite servers and SoftLayer environment, and so much more.

Kevin Tan (@s1lve3rd3m0n), CEO, Double Edge Software and Iskandar Reza (@iskandarreza), Cirrus Byte commented that the introduction to the company was an eye opener, and they were glad to get the technical overview of the services, control portal and flexibility offered by SoftLayer cloud.

A chunk of the workshop focused on technical hands-on-training. Phil Jackson, lead developer advocate (@underscorephil), and Chris Gallo, developer community advocate (@allmightspiff), set up attendees with demo accounts to run test scenarios and taught folks how to automate a blog on the cloud.

Casey Lau, Catalyst lead (@casey_lau) and Mic Kwok, sales engineer, also joined us in Hong Kong to discuss how other startups leverage the cloud.

"I am not really a techie, but the presentation, set up of the servers, and login was so nice and easy. I would definitely recommend this workshop and SoftLayer to my startup friends in KL [Kuala Lumpur] and PJ[(Petaling Jaya]."
- @hazimsufyan, a student of IT and business technology

Reaching Out to the Asian Community

One the reasons we planned this workshop series was to help inform the startup and developer communities in Asia about the various cloud models available to deploy their innovative ideas and applications.

"The monthly and hourly packages offered without contracts are amazing as most of us would not want to be tied in long-term contracts."
-@jemhor, a consultant in mobile applications and technology space

"Definitely a good start for those who want to know more about cloud. After these sessions, we can definitely play around, compare various services, and go about building our own cloud."
- Steason Tee, Founder of Freak Lab

Thank You

A big shout out to all who attended #SLAsiaRoadshow and for the interesting discussions had. If you're looking for more dirt on SoftLayer at the Asia Roadshow, take a peek at e27's blog.

Also, thanks for the suggestions on what you would like to see in the next workshop, ideas on what startups would like to see from the cloud industry, and on how SoftLayer can continue building and improving itself. Keep them coming!

For more information on the workshops or to register for upcoming cities, drop us a note at marketingAP@softlayer.com.

Cheers
-Namrata
(Connect with me on LinkedIn or, Twitter)

October 28, 2014

SoftLayer and AWS: What's the Difference?

People often compare SoftLayer with Amazon Web Services (AWS).

It’s easy to understand why. We’ve both built scalable infrastructure platforms to provide cloud resources to the same broad range of customers—from individual entrepreneurs to the world’s largest enterprises.

But while the desire to compare is understandable, the comparison itself isn’t quite apt. The SoftLayer platform is fundamentally different from AWS.

In fact, AWS could be run on SoftLayer. SoftLayer couldn’t be run on AWS.

AWS provisions in the public cloud.

When AWS started letting customers have virtual machines deployed on the infrastructure that AWS had built for their e-commerce business, AWS accelerated the adoption of virtual server hosting within the existing world of Web hosting.

In an AWS cloud environment, customers order the computing and storage resources they need, and AWS deploys those resources on demand. The mechanics of that deployment are important to note, though.

AWS has data centers full of physical servers that are integrated with each other in a massive public cloud environment. These servers are managed and maintained by AWS, and they collectively make up the available cloud infrastructure in the facility.

AWS installs a virtualization layer (also known as hypervisor) on these physical servers to tie the individual nodes into the environment’s total capacity. When a customer orders a cloud server from AWS, this virtualization layer finds a node with the requested resources available and provisions a server image with the customer’s desired operating system, applications, etc. The entire process is quick and automated, and each customer has complete control over the resources he or she ordered.

That virtualization layer is serving a purpose, and it may seem insignificant, but it highlights a critical difference in their platform and ours:

AWS automates and provisions at the hypervisor level, while SoftLayer automates and provisions at the data center level.

SoftLayer provisions down to bare metal resources.

While many have their sights on beating AWS at its own game, SoftLayer plays a different game.

SoftLayer platform is designed to give customers complete access and control over the actual infrastructure that they need to build a solution in the cloud. Automated and remote ordering, deployment, and management of the very server, storage, and security hardware resources themselves, are hosted in our data centers so that customers don’t have to build their own facilities or purchase their own hardware to get the reliable, high performance computing they need.

Everything in SoftLayer data centers is transparent, automated, integrated, and built on an open API that customers can access directly. Every server is connected to three distinct physical networks so that public, private, and management network traffic are segmented. And our expert technical support is available for all customers, 24x7.

Notice that the automation and integration of our platform happens at the data center level. We don’t need a virtualization layer to deploy our cloud resources. As a result, we can deploy bare metal servers in the same way AWS deploys public cloud servers (though, admittedly, bare metal servers take more time to deploy than virtual servers in the public cloud). By provisioning down to a lower level in the infrastructure stack, we’re able to offer customers more choice and control in their cloud environments:

In addition to the control customers have over infrastructure resources, with our unique network architecture, their servers aren’t isolated inside the four walls of a single data center. Customers can order one server in Dallas and another in Hong Kong, and those two servers can communicate with each other directly and freely across our private network without interfering with customers’ public network traffic. So with every new data center we build, we geographically expand a unified cloud footprint. No regions. No software-defined virtual networks. No isolation.

SoftLayer vs. AWS

Parts of our cloud business certainly compete with AWS. When users compare virtual servers between us, they encounter a number of similarities. But this post isn’t about comparing and contrasting offerings in the areas in which we’re similar … it’s about explaining how we’re different:
  • SoftLayer is able to provision bare metal resources to customers. This allows customers free reign over the raw compute power of a specific server configuration. This saves the customer from the 2–3 percent performance hit from the hypervisor, and it prevents “noisy neighbors” from being provisioned alongside a customer’s virtual server. AWS does not provision bare metal resources.

  • AWS differentiates “availability zones” and “regions” for customers who want to expand their cloud infrastructure into multiple locations. SoftLayer has data centers interconnected on a global private network. Customers can select the specific SoftLayer data center location they want so they can provision servers in the exact location they desire.

  • When AWS customers move data between their AWS servers, they see “Inter-Region Data Transfer Out” and “Intra-Region Data Transfer” on their bills. If you’re moving data from one SoftLayer facility to another SoftLayer facility (anywhere in the world), that transfer is free and unmetered. And it doesn’t fight your public traffic for bandwidth.

  • SoftLayer bare metal servers ordered with monthly billing include 20TB/mo of public outbound bandwidth, and virtual servers ordered with monthly billing include 5TB/mo of public outbound bandwidth. With AWS, customers pay a per-GB charge for bandwidth on every bill.

  • SoftLayer offers a broad range of management, monitoring, and support options to customers at no additional cost. AWS charges for monitoring based on metrics, frequency, and number of alarms per resource. And having access to support requires an additional monthly cost.

Do SoftLayer and AWS both offer Infrastructure as a Service? Yes.

Does that make SoftLayer and AWS the same? No.

-@khazard

October 24, 2014

SoftLayer at IBM Insight 2014

IBM will be lighting up Las Vegas next week with Insight 2014, the conference for big data and analytics. Starting this Sunday and running through Thursday, October 30 at the Mandalay Bay, this show will offer amazing opportunities to learn more about the advantages of delivering big data and analytics services, and many of those advantages involve the SoftLayer cloud platform.

To guide you through the 700+ sessions and streams easier, we’ve compiled a list of must-attend SoftLayer- and cloud-based sessions.

Business Partner Summit

Breakout Session 7157: Partner with SoftLayer for Your Big Data and Analytics Workloads
Sunday, October 26 @ 2:00 p.m. – Tradewinds A (For Business Partners only)
Featured Speakers: Anand Mahurkar, founder and CEO Findability Sciences, and Guy Kurtz, IBM North America Channel Sales Leader

General Conference Sessions

BPM-6838A: Experience Faster Time to Value with IBM Cognos TM1 on Cloud
Monday, October 27 @ 10:15 a.m. – Mandalay Bay J
Learn how the SoftLayer infrastructure with IBM Cognos TM1 can help you gain better performance, operational savings, reliability, and scalability.

IIS-5758A: How Joy Global is Using Big Data as a Differentiator in the Mining Industry
Monday, October 27 @ 10:15 a.m. – Jasmine B
We’ll dig deep to learn how Joy Global runs one of the most sophisticated big data platforms in the industry hosted by a combination of SoftLayer and IBM Global Business Services.

IDB-4741C: Accelerate Social Media Analytics for Big Insight with IBM DB2 BLU and IBM InfoSphere Optim Database Tools
Monday, October 27 @ 3:30 p.m. – Jasmine F
Can the right combination of technologies help accelerate a social media analytics application hosted on SoftLayer? Yes.

EEP-5498A: Industry Leaders, IBM ECM and SoftLayer Deliver Trusted Content Anywhere with IBM Navigator on Cloud
Tuesday, October 28 @ 1:45 p.m. – Lagoon H
Extend ECM to the SoftLayer cloud platform by leveraging IBM’s pervasive ECM experience platform, IBM Content Navigator.

FTC-4285A: Data Warehousing and Analytics in the Cloud: IBM's New Data Warehousing Service
Tuesday, October 28 @ 3:00 p.m. – Islander E
Combining the best of BLU Acceleration, Netezza Technology, and SoftLayer, come see how Data Warehousing Service can be used to provide analytics for existing cloud-based data stores.

LCE-5575A: Building a Robust ECM Solution Step-by-Step
Wednesday, October 29 @ 2:00 p.m. – Shorelines B Lab Room 11
A step-by-step guide to building an ECM solution on a SoftLayer platform.

EEP-7001A: Expert Exchange: ECM in the Cloud
Wednesday, October 29 @ 4:30 p.m. – Breakers E
Meet the ECM development team and learn how they designed and deployed Navigator Cloud Edition on SoftLayer.

III-5198A: Using IBM Bluemix and SoftLayer to Run IBM InfoSphere Information Server on an Intel Technology-Powered Cloud
Thursday, October 30 @ 10:00 a.m. – Jasmine E
Learn how InfoSphere Information Server works in the cloud, and how SoftLayer bare metal and virtualization options contribute to the scaling performance.

LCI-5234A: On-Demand Data Archiving with Cloud-based Data Warehousing Services
Thursday, October 30 @ 10:00 a.m. – Shorelines B Lab Room 2
This lab will showcase the entire BLU Acceleration as a Cloud solution using SoftLayer.

If you’re a registered attendee and haven’t already done so, visit the IBM Insight 2014 website for complete descriptions of all sessions, and start building your agenda.

And don’t forget to stop by the SoftLayer pedestal in the IBM Cloud booth #515. We look forward to seeing you.

-Ted

October 23, 2014

CSS3 Tips and Tricks – Mastering Multiple Backgrounds

I’ve written a lot of blog posts, some on our very own SoftLayer Development Network, but most of them have been posted right here on SoftLayer’s main blog. One of the most popular is a tutorial I wrote on being able to create a customized background depending on the user’s location. For example: A person visiting a website from the United States during the daytime may see a beautiful yellow background with an orange glow and a bright yellow sun just above the horizon, while a surfer from China may see the same website, but with a dark purple background with subtle white stars and a shimmering moon because it is night. The example I wrote customized the CSS to the time zone based on locale tailoring the site with a more personal touch.

The demand for sites to serve a more interactive experience has always been large in volume, but few websites actually deliver.

Luckily, our Web languages are evolving all of the time, and since I’ve written the “What time is it for you?” blog on our SLDN, more advancements have been made to the background functionality and browser compatibility. This means MORE browsers support these new features, and it’s compliant across the board!

Let’s start off with our usual HTML document (with an addition of an empty div for now, this is where we’re going to master our background techniques).

<html>
<head>
    <title>CSS3 Tips and Tricks – Mastering Multiple Backgrounds</title>
</head>
<body>
    <div class=”slBackgrounds”></div>
</body>
</html>

With CSS3, we can define multiple backgrounds in one declaration, like this:

background: url('earth.png') no-repeat top 30px center, url('star_bg.png') repeat-y center;

By separating each background with just a comma, we’re able to declare many backgrounds for one div. Let’s go ahead and add our multi-background CSS in the <head> of our document:

<style>
    .slBackgrounds {
        width: 300px;
        height: 300px;
        margin: 0 auto;
        background: url('earth.png') no-repeat top 30px center, url('star_bg.png') repeat-y center;
        transition:background-position 600s;
    }
 
    .slBackgrounds:hover {
        background-position: top 30px center, 0px 60000px;
    }
</style>

After adding the CSS styling, you should have something that looks similar to the following:

You’ll notice I added a transition property to the .slBackgrounds class, and I bet you’re wondering why? Everybody has their own learning technique that helps them absorb concepts better and faster than other methods. My learning method (and probably 75 percent of other developers) happens to be the challenge technique: When I learn something new, I think about something extremely fun and challenging that I would like to do with this newfound knowledge beyond just the base use. For instance, why learn how to use multiple backgrounds with CSS3 and just have a five-line blog when we can learn to use multiple backgrounds, AND create an awesome animation sequence that can jazz up the old and boring background system?

Not only does this jazz it up, but by using additions such as the transition and :hover properties, we’re able to open new doors to possibilities with interactivity.

If you haven’t guessed already, the .slBackgrounds:hover section covers what should happen to the .slBackgrounds div when the user hovers over it; in this case, there’s a background-position declaration. The ‘top 30px center’ applies to the first background image, and the ‘0px 60000px’ applies to the second (gotta love multiple backgrounds!).

Go ahead and hover over our images! You should see something like this:

Something pretty simple, but I bet you can already think of a hundred things you can do with the CSS3 multiple background ability, huh? The great news is that the cross-browser compatibility is awesome and supports all newer browsers and most reasonably older ones too! And to think . . . barely five or six years ago it took MUCH more innovative coding and workarounds to achieve results like this without just embedding a flash file or an animated gif!

We’d love to hear how YOU’RE using multiple backgrounds!

- Cassandra

October 20, 2014

Clean Your Virtual Desktop Day

“A national holiday specifically for cleaning! Be still my heart,” said the neat freak.

So, I didn’t really know how to start this blog post because my virtual desktop is pretty clean. I adhere to the school of thought, “a place for everything and everything in its place.” Does this make me a neat freak void of any creativity? More on that later.

With that being said, I started with a quick Google search for “de-cluttering your desktop.” I didn’t realize there would be so many articles on the subject. No surprise, Martha Stewart even posted an article about the topic full of words like “tidy,” “unholy mess,” and “. . . makes people cranky.”

Wait.

Come back.

We’re not going to talk about Martha’s how-to guide here. [This is SoftLayer—the only how-to guides posted here are about CSS.] I actually found some pretty cool ideas that I’d like to pass on to our readers in honor of the day.

I came across a tutorial on how to create a wallpaper for your desktop in which you “drop” your desktop icons into appropriate sections. The tutorial used Adobe Photoshop, but if you’re like me, Photoshop-illiterate, you can use PowerPoint (I find it so much easier, albeit limiting). Here’s a screen shot of my desktop.

For our more tech-savvy readers . . . download Fences®. It’s basically the same thing as the DIY version I described above, but it allows you to place your icons into resizable shaded areas on your desktop. Pretty cool!

Most people store files on their desktops because they think it makes it easier to find them, but sooner or later, your desktop gets overrun by these once easy-to-find files. If you want something that will keep your desktop free from any documents, install a launcher program. There are lots to choose from, including LaunchBar, Quicksilver, Launchy, or AutoHotkey. Once installed, the program is activated by a keystroke combination. When it opens, start typing the program, folder name, or file you want open. According to users, it’s faster than locating the icon on your desktop and double-clicking. Many users claim they don’t know how they lived without it for so long.

My last tip is similar to when your mom asks you to clean your room, and all you do is shove everything under your bed. Same thing here. Just hide all those icons.

  1. Right click on your desktop
  2. Select View
  3. Unselect Show your desktop icons

That’s right. Out of sight. Out of mind.

“If a cluttered desk is a sign of a cluttered mind, of what, then, is an empty desk a sign?”

I don’t know what Albert Einstein was implying when he said that, but I do know personally that a messy desk lowers my productivity. Does this lower my creativity too?

After reviewing a few different studies on whether or not clutter produces creativity or chaos, I have come to the conclusion that if you need to accomplish practical chores like paying bills or replying to emails, you need a clutter-free workspace to focus. If you need to be creative, clutter can distract you and let you think outside of the box.

Personally, I don’t think that a clean slate lowers my creativity because I can’t even begin to work if it is messy. But, some people thrive in chaos. Hey, whatever works.

Happy Cleaning/Cluttering!

-JRL

October 16, 2014

#T4 – Tips and Tricks–jQuery Select2

Who doesn’t like a walk down memory lane? In our #T4 series, SoftLayer brings back popular tech tip blog posts. #ThrowbackThursday #T4 #ThrowbackThursdayTechTips

Creating a drop-down menu? Here’s an abridged version of our Tips and Tricks – jQuery Select2 Plugin post from two years ago tomorrow!

Turn your drop-down menu from this:
Option Select

To this:

Pretty Option Select

  1. Download Select2 and upload it to your server.
  2. Add the jQuery library and scripts to the <head> of the page document:
  3. <script src="jquery.js" type="text/javascript"></script> 
    <script src="select2.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  4. Add Select2's included style sheet:
  5. <link href="select2.css" rel="stylesheet"/>

  6. Before closing the <head> tag, invoke the Select2 function:
  7. <script>
    $(document).ready(function() { $("#selectPretty").select2(); });
    </script>
  8. Then add the #selectPretty ID to the select element you want to improve:
    <select id="selectPretty">
    <option value="Option1">Option 1</option>
    <option value="Option2">Option 2</option>
    <option value="Option3">Option 3</option>
    <option value="Option4">Option 4</option>
    </select>

For questions, comments, or just feel like chatting, contact us at social@softlayer.com.

-Cassandra

October 14, 2014

Enterprise Customers See Benefits of Direct Link with GRE Tunnels

We’ve had an overwhelming response to our Direct Link product launch over the past few months and with good reason. Customers can cross connect into the SoftLayer global private network with a direct link in any of our 22 points of presence (POPs) providing fast, secure, and unmetered access to their SoftLayer infrastructure from their remote data center locations.

Many of our enterprise customers who’ve set up a Direct Link want to balance the simplicity of a layer three cross connection with their sophisticated routing and access control list (ACL) requirements. To achieve this balance, many are using GRE tunnels from their on-premises routers to their SoftLayer Vyatta Gateway Appliance.

In previous blogs about Vyatta Gateway Appliance, we’ve described some typical use cases as well as highlighted the differences between the Vyatta OS and the Vyatta Appliance. So we’ll focus specifically on using GRE tunnels here.

What is GRE?
Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) is a protocol for packet encapsulation to facilitate routing other protocols over IP networks (RFC 2784). Customers typically create two endpoints for the tunnel; one on their remote router and the other on their Vyatta Gateway Appliance at SoftLayer.
How does GRE work?
GRE encapsulates a payload, an inner packet that needs to be delivered to a destination network, within an outer IP packet. Between two GRE endpoints all routers will look at the outer IP packet and forward it towards the endpoint where the inner packet is parsed and routed to the ultimate destination.
Why use GRE tunnels?
If a customer has multiple subnets at SoftLayer that need routing to, these would need multiple tunnels to each if they were not encapsulating with GRE. Since GRE encapsulates traffic within an outer packet, customers are able to route other protocols within the tunnel and route multiple subnets without multiple tunnels. A GRE endpoint on Vyatta will parse the packets and route them, eliminating that challenge.

Many of our enterprise customers have complex rules governing what servers and networks can communicate with each other. They typically build ACLs on their routers to enforce those rules. Having a GRE endpoint on a Vyatta Gateway Appliance allows customers to route and manage internal packets based on specific rules so that security models stay intact.

GRE tunnels can allow customers to keep their networking scheme; meaning customers can add IP addresses to their SoftLayer servers and directly access them eliminating any routing problems that could occur.

And, because GRE tunnels can run inside a VPN tunnel, customers can put the GRE inside of an IPSec tunnel to make it more secure.

Learn More on KnowledgeLayer

If you are considering Direct Link to achieve fast and unmetered access with the help of GRE tunnels and Vyatta Gateway Appliance but need more information, the SoftLayer KnowledgeLayer is continually updated with new information and best practices. Be sure to check out the entire section devoted to the Vyatta Gateway Appliance.

- Seth

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