tips-and-tricks

February 20, 2014

SoftLayer at IBM Pulse 2014

When you plan your IBM Pulse schedule, you'll want to know where to find SoftLayer in the sea of people, sessions and events in Las Vegas next week. I consolidated some of the SoftLayer-specific highlights into this blog post, but by the time I got to the end of the post, it seemed like a daunting amount of content. To give the blog audience a "tl;dr" ("too long; didn't read") alternative, I convinced a few of my coworkers into sharing a quick overview of our activities via video:

Armed with the information from the video, scan down the rest of this post for details about the specific sessions or events that piqued your interest.

SoftLayer-Led IBM Pulse Sessions

Six different SLayers are presenting IBM Pulse 2014 sessions — five technical overviews, one panel, and one general session. Click on any of the topics below to read the session abstracts and learn more about the presenter with the IBM Pulse agenda preview tool.

IAS-2137A: Compute-as-a-Service: More than a Virtual Affair?
Steven Canale, VP of Global Sales
Monday, February 24 @ 11:15am — Room 119
IAS-2145A: Comparing Cloud Computing Models for Performance and Workload Suitability
Marc Jones, VP of Product Innovation
Monday, February 24 @ 1:00pm — Room 101
IAS-2117A: Cloud Performance is Not a Commodity
Nathan Day, Chief Scientist
Monday, February 24 @ 3:45pm — Room 119
IAS-1943A: Elastic OpenStack Private Clouds on SoftLayer
Marc Jones, VP of Product Innovation (+ Panel)
Tuesday, February 25 @ 11:15am — Room 124
IAS-2158A: High-Performance, Scalable Big Data Solutions in a Bare Metal Cloud
Harold Hannon, Sr. Software Architect
Tuesday, February 25 @ 2:15pm — Room 119
IAS-2167A: Infrastructure at Scale: Best Practices in Scaling Cloud Architectures
Phil Jackson, Developer Advocate Lead
Tuesday, February 25 @ 3:45pm — Room 119
GEN-2539A: General Session Day 3: Inspiring Bold Moves
Lance Crosby, CEO
Wednesday, February 26 @ 9:00am — Grand Garden Arena

Solution EXPO

In addition to those presentations, we'll be making a lot of noise in the Solution EXPO. Visit the IAAS Zone in the Cloud Demo Area to find us at Demo Pad 432-08. Here, you'll get a first-hand look at the ordering, configuration and management tools we use for our bare metal and virtual server cloud resources. Click around in our customer portal, try out our ordering process, and learn more about the automation that drives our cloud platform.

After you learn about SoftLayer in the Demo area, make your way to the Cloud Category Area to compete in the legendary Server Challenge II competition at #332. Your goal will be to repopulate the drives and network cables into a scaled-down version of a SoftLayer server rack, and if you record the best time at the event, you'll walk away with the pride of being the IBM Pulse 2014 Server Challenge champion... and a MacBook Air. To train for your two attempts per day, you might want to watch the current world record: SoftLayer + Supermicro Server Challenge II - World Record.

Dev@Pulse

Happening in parallel with IBM Pulse, Dev@Pulse is a FREE developer-focused event where attendees have access to hands-on labs, lightning talks and a playground of technical toys like the Oculus Rift and Parrot AR Drones. Additionally, IBM subject matter experts will be on-site to answer questions and help developers solve any of the code-related problems they've run into. And yes, as Phil Jackson so humbly explained in the video, he'll be presenting one of those lightning talks.

Pulse Palooza

To relax and unwind a bit after the heavy-hitting sessions on Monday and Tuesday, IBM Pulse is rolling out the red carpet for attendees to party in the MGM Grand Garden Arena from 7:00-10:00pm with live performances by Elvis Costello and Fall Out Boy!

Pulse Palooza

This event is included with all Pulse passes, and as Ryan said in the video, it's guaranteed to be a good time.

I can't even begin to describe the excitement our team has about IBM Pulse 2014, and we hope you feel the same way. Next week will be a great opportunity for you to learn more about SoftLayer, AND it'll give us a chance to learn more about your business and how we help you improve it in the cloud.

-@khazard

February 6, 2014

Building a Bridge to the OpenStack API

OpenStack is experiencing explosive growth in the cloud market. With more than 200 companies contributing code to the source and new installations coming online every day, OpenStack is pushing hard to become a global standard for cloud computing. Dozens of useful tools and software products have been developed using the OpenStack API, so a growing community of administrators, developers and IT organizations have access to easy-to-use, powerful cloud resources. This kind of OpenStack integration is great for users on a full OpenStack cloud, but it introduces a challenge to providers and users on other cloud platforms: Should we consider deploying or moving to an OpenStack environment to take advantage of these tools?

If a cloud provider spends years developing a unique platform with a proprietary API, implementing native support for the OpenStack API or deploying a full OpenStack solution may be cost prohibitive, even with significant customer and market demand. The provider can either bite the bullet to implement OpenStack compatibility, hope that a third party library like libclouds or fog is updated to support its API, or choose to go it alone and develop an ecosystem of products around its own API.

Introducing Jumpgate

When we were faced with this situation at SoftLayer, we chose a fourth option. We wanted to make the process of creating an OpenStack-compatible API simpler and more modular. That's where Jumpgate was born. Jumpgate is a middleware that acts as a compatibility layer between the OpenStack API and a provider's proprietary API. Externally, it exposes endpoints that adhere to OpenStack's published and accepted API specification, which it then translates into the provider's API using a series of drivers. Think of it as a mechanism to enable passing from one realm/space into another — like the jumpgates featured in science fiction works.

Connection

How Jumpgate Works
Let's take a look at a high-level example: When you want to create a new virtual instance on OpenStack, you might use the Horizon dashboard or the Nova command line client. When you issue the request, the tool first makes a REST call to a Keystone endpoint for authentication, which returns an authorization token. The client then makes another REST call to a Nova endpoint, which manages the computing instances, to create the actual virtual instance. Nova may then make calls to other tools within the cluster for networking (Quantum), image information (Glance), block storage (Cinder), or more. In addition, your client may also send requests directly to some of these endpoints to query for status updates, information about available resources, and so on.

With Jumpgate, your tool first hits the Jumpgate middleware, which exposes a Keystone endpoint. Jumpgate takes the request, breaks it apart into its relevant pieces, then loads up your provider's appropriate API driver. Next, Jumpgate reformats your request into a form that the driver supports and sends it to the provider's API endpoint. Once the response comes back, Jumpgate again uses the driver to break apart the proprietary API response, reformats it into an OpenStack compatible JSON payload, and sends it back to your client. The result is that you interact with an OpenStack-compatible API, and your cloud provider processes those interactions on their own backend infrastructure.

Internally, Jumpgate is a lightweight middleware built in Python using the Falcon Framework. It provides endpoints for nearly every documented OpenStack API call and allows drivers to attach handlers to these endpoints. This modular approach allows providers to implement only the endpoints that are of the highest importance, rolling out OpenStack API compatibility in stages rather than in one monumental effort. Since it sits alongside the provider's existing API, Jumpgate provides a new API interface without risking the stability already provided by the existing API. It's a value-add service that increases customer satisfaction without a huge increase in cost. Once full implementations is finished, a provider with a proprietary cloud platform can benefit from and offer all the tools that are developed to work with the OpenStack API.

Jumpgate allows providers to test the proper OpenStack compatibility of their drivers by leveraging the OpenStack Tempest test suite. With these tests, developers run the full suite of calls used by OpenStack itself, highlighting edge cases or gaps in functionality. We've even included a helper script that allows Tempest to only run a subset of tests rather than the entire suite to assist with a staged rollout.

Current Development
Jumpgate is currently in an early alpha stage. We've built the compatibility framework itself and started on the SoftLayer drivers as a reference. So far, we've implemented key endpoints within Nova (computing instances), Keystone (identification and authorization), and Glance (image management) to get most of the basic functionality within Horizon (the web dashboard) working. We've heard that several groups outside SoftLayer are successfully using Jumpgate to drive products like Trove and Heat directly on SoftLayer, which is exciting and shows that we're well beyond the "proof of concept" stage. That being said, there's still a lot of work to be done.

We chose to develop Jumpgate in the open with a tool set that would be familiar to developers working with OpenStack. We're excited to debut this project for the broader OpenStack community, and we're accepting pull requests if you're interested in contributing. Making more clouds compatible with the OpenStack API is important and shouldn’t be an individual undertaking. If you're interested in learning more or contributing, head over to our in-flight project page on GitHub: SoftLayer Jumpgate. There, you'll find everything you need to get started along with the updates to our repository. We encourage everyone to contribute code or drivers ... or even just open issues with feature requests. The more community involvement we get, the better.

-Nathan

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February 3, 2014

Risk Management: 5 Tips for Managing Risk in the Cloud

Security breaches have made front-page news in recent months. With stories about Target, Neiman Marcus, Yahoo! and GoDaddy in the headlines recently, the importance of good information security practices is becoming harder and harder to ignore — even for smaller businesses. Moving your business into the cloud offers a plethora of benefits; however, those benefits do not come without their challenges. Moving your business into the cloud involves risks such as multi-tenancy, so it's important to be able to properly manage and identify these risks.

1. Know the Security Your Provider Offers
While some SaaS providers may have security baked-in, most IaaS providers (including SoftLayer) leave much of the logical security responsibility of a customer's systems to the customer. For the security measures that an infrastructure provider handles, the provider should be able to deliver documentation attesting these controls. We perform an annual SOC2 audit, so we can attest to the status of our security and availability controls as a service organization. With this information, our customers use controls from our report as part of their own compliance requirements. Knowing a provider's security controls (and seeing proof of that security) allows business owners and Chief Information Security Officers (CISO) to have peace-of-mind that they can properly plan their control activities to better prevent or respond to a breach.

2. Use the Cloud to Distribute and Replicate Your Presence
The incredible scalability and geographical distribution of operating in the cloud can yield some surprising payoff. Experts in the security industry are leveraging the cloud to reduce their patch cycles to days, not weeks or months. Most cloud providers have multiple sites so that you can spread your presence nationally, or even globally. With this kind of infrastructure footprint, businesses can replicate failover systems and accommodate regional demand across multiple facilities with the minimal incremental investment (and with nearly identical security controls).

3. Go Back to the Basics
Configuration management. Asset management. Separation of duties. Strong passwords. Many organizations get so distracted by the big picture of their security measures that they fail to manage these basic rights. Take advantage of any of your provider's tools to assist in the ‘mundane’ tasks that are vitally important to your business's overall security posture. For example, you can use image templates or post-provisioning scripts to deploy a standard baseline configuration to your systems, then track them down to the specific server room. You’ll know what hardware is in your server at all times, and if you're using SoftLayer, you can even drill down to the serial numbers of your hard drives.

4. Have Sound Incident Response Plans
The industry is becoming increasingly cognizant of the fact that it’s not a matter of if, but when a security threat will present itself. Even with exceedingly high levels of baked-in security, most of the recent breaches resulted from a compromised employee. Be prepared to respond to security incidents with confidence. While you may be physically distanced from your systems, you should be able to meet defined Recovery Time Objectives (RTOs) for your services.

5. Maintain Constant Contact with Your Cloud Provider
Things happen. No amount of planning can completely halt every incident, whether it be a natural disaster or a determined attacker. Know that your hosting provider has your back when things take an unexpected turn.

With proper planning and good practice, the cloud isn't as risky and frightening as most think. If you're interested in learning a little more about the best practices around security in the cloud, check out the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA). The CSA provides a wealth of knowledge to assist business owners and security professionals alike. Build on the strengths, compensate for the weaknesses, and you and your CISO will be able to sleep at night (and maybe even sneak in a beer after work).

-Matt

January 31, 2014

Simplified OpenStack Deployment on SoftLayer

"What is SoftLayer doing with OpenStack?" I can't even begin to count the number of times I've been asked that question over the last few years. In response, I'll usually explain how we've built our object storage platform on top of OpenStack Swift, or I'll give a few examples of how our customers have used SoftLayer infrastructure to build and scale their own OpenStack environments. Our virtual and bare metal cloud servers provide a powerful and flexible foundation for any OpenStack deployment, and our unique three-tiered network integrates perfectly with OpenStack's Compute and Network node architecture, so it's high time we make it easier to build an OpenStack environment on SoftLayer infrastructure.

To streamline and simplify OpenStack deployment for the open source community, we've published Opscode Chef recipes for both OpenStack Grizzly and OpenStack Havana on GitHub: SoftLayer Chef-Openstack. With Chef and SoftLayer, your own OpenStack cloud is a cookbook away. These recipes were designed with the needs of growth and scalability in mind. Let's take a deeper look into what exactly that means.

OpenStack has adopted a three-node design whereby a controller, compute, and network node make up its architecture:

OpenStack Architecture on SoftLayer

Looking more closely at any one node reveal the services it provides. Scaling the infrastructure beyond a few dozen nodes, using this model, could create bottlenecks in services such as your block store, OpenStack Cinder, and image store, OpenStack Glance, since they are traditionally located on the controller node. Infrastructure requirements change from service to service as well. For example OpenStack Neutron, the networking service, does not need much disk I/O while the Cinder storage service might heavily rely on a node's hard disk. Our cookbook allows you to choose how and where to deploy the services, and it even lets you break apart the MySQL backend to further improve platform performance.

Quick Start: Local Demo Environment

To make it easy to get started, we've created a rapid prototype and sandbox script for use with Vagrant and Virtual Box. With Vagrant, you can easily spin up a demo environment of Chef Server and OpenStack in about 15 minutes on moderately good laptops or desktops. Check it out here. This demo environment is an all-in-one installation of our Chef OpenStack deployment. It also installs a basic Chef server as a sandbox to help you see how the SoftLayer recipes were deployed.

Creating a Custom OpenStack Deployment

The thee-node OpenStack model does well in small scale and meets the needs of many consumers; however, control and customizability are the tenants for the design of the SoftLayer OpenStack Chef cookbook. In our model, you have full control over the configuration and location of eleven different components in your deployed environment:

Our Chef recipes will take care of populating the configuration files with the necessary information so you won't have to. When deploying, you merely add the role for the matching service to a hardware or virtual server node, and Chef will deploy the service to it with all the configuration done automatically, including adding multiple Neutron, Nova, and Cinder nodes. This approach allows you to tailor the needs of each service to the hardware it will be deployed to--you might put your Neutron hardware node on a server with 10-gigabit network interfaces and configure your Cinder hardware node with RAID 1+0 15k SAS drives.

OpenStack is a fast growing project for the implementation of IaaS in public and private clouds, but its deployment and configuration can be overwhelming. We created this cookbook to make the process of deploying a full OpenStack environment on SoftLayer quick and straightforward. With the simple configuration of eleven Chef roles, your OpenStack cloud can be deployed onto as little as one node and scaled up to many as hundreds (or thousands).

To follow this project, visit SoftLayer on GitHub. Check out some of our other projects on GitHub, and let us know if you need any help or want to contribute.

-@marcalanjones

January 29, 2014

Get Your Pulse Racing

What will the future bring for SoftLayer and IBM? Over the past six months, you've probably asked that question more than a few times, and the answer you got may have been incomplete. You know that IBM is supercharging SoftLayer expansion and that our platform will be the foundation for IBM's most popular enterprise cloud products and services, but you've really only seen a glimpse of the big picture. At IBM Pulse, you'll get a much better view.

SoftLayer is no stranger to conferences and events. Last year alone, we were involved in around 70 different trade shows, and that number doesn't include the dozens of meetups, events, and parties we participated in without an official booth presence. It's pretty safe to say that Pulse is more important to us than any of the shows we've attended in the past. Why? Because Pulse is the first major conference where SoftLayer will be in the spotlight.

As a major component in IBM's cloud strategy, it's safe to assume that every attendee at IBM's "Premier Cloud Conference" will hear all about SoftLayer's platform and capabilities. We'll have the Server Challenge on the expo hall floor, we're going to play a huge part in connecting with developers at dev@Pulse, a number of SLayers are slated to lead technical sessions, and Wednesday's general session will be presented by our CEO, Lance Crosby.

If you're interested in what's next for IBM in the cloud, join us at Pulse 2014. SoftLayer customers are eligible for a significant discount on registration for the full conference, so if you need details on how to sign up, leave a comment on this blog or contact a SoftLayer sales rep, and we'll make sure you get all the information you need. To make it easier for first-time attendees to experience Pulse, IBM offers a special Pulse Peek pass that will get you into the general sessions and expo hall for free!

If you're a developer, we need to see you at dev@Pulse. Happening in parallel with the main Pulse show, dev@Pulse is focused on helping attendees design, develop, and deploy the next generation of cloud-based systems and applications. In addition to the lightning talks, hands-on labs, free certification testing, and code jam competition, you'll get to try out the Oculus Rift, meet a ton of brilliant people, and party with Elvis Costello and Fall Out Boy. The cost? A whopping $0.

Whether you're chairman of the board or a front-line application developer, you'll get a lot out of IBM Pulse. What happens in Vegas ... could change the way you do business. (Note: The parties, however, will stay in Vegas.)

-@khazard

January 17, 2014

What's Next? $1.2 Billion Investment. 15 New Data Centers.

SoftLayer was founded in a living room on May 5, 2005. We bootstrapped our vision of becoming the de facto platform for cloud computing by maxing out our credit cards and draining our savings accounts. Over the course of eight years, we built a unique global offering, and in the middle of last year, our long-term vision was validated (and supercharged) by IBM.

When I posted about IBM acquiring SoftLayer last June, I explained that becoming part of IBM "will enable us to continue doing what we've done since 2005, but on an even bigger scale and with greater opportunities." To give you an idea of what "bigger scale" and "greater opportunities" look like, I need only direct you to today's press release: IBM Commits $1.2 Billion to Expand Global Cloud Footprint.

IBM Cloud Investment

It took us the better part of a decade to build a worldwide network of 13 data centers. As part of IBM, we'll more than double our data center footprint in a fraction of that time. In 2006, we were making big moves when we built facilities on the East and West coasts of the United States. Now, we're expanding into places like China, Hong Kong, London, Japan, India, Canada and Mexico City. We had a handful of founders pushing for SoftLayer's success, and now we've got 430,000+ IBM peers to help us reach our goal. This is a whole new ballgame.

The most important overarching story about this planned expansion is what each new facility will mean for our customers. When any cloud provider builds a data center in a new location, it's great news for customers and users in that geographic region: Content in that facility will be geographically closer to them, and they'll see lower pings and better performance from that data center. When SoftLayer builds a data center in a new location, customers and users in that geographic region see performance improvements from *all* of our data centers. The new facility serves as an on-ramp to our global network, so content on any server in any of our data centers can be accessed faster. To help illustrate that point, let's look at a specific example:

If you're in India, and you want to access content from a SoftLayer server in Singapore, you'll traverse the public Internet to reach our network, and the content will traverse the public Internet to get back to you. Third-party peering and transit providers pass the content to/from our network and your ISP, and you'll get the content you requested.

When we add a SoftLayer data center in India, you'll obviously access servers in that facility much more quickly, and when you want content from a server in our Singapore data center, you'll be routed through that new data center's network point of presence in India so that the long haul from India to Singapore will happen entirely on the private network we control and optimize.

Users around the world will have faster, more reliable access to servers in every other SoftLayer data center because we're bringing our network to their front doors. When you combine that kind connectivity and access with our unique hybrid offering of powerful bare metal servers and scalable virtual server instances, it's easy to see how IBM, the most powerful technology company of the last 100 years, is positioned to remain the most powerful technology company in the world for the next century.

Now it's time to get to work.

-@lavosby

January 15, 2014

Keep Spending Most Our Lives Livin' in a Gamer's Paradise

With apologies to Coolio, I couldn't resist adapting a line from the chorus of "Gangsta's Paradise" to be the title of this blog post. While I could come up with a full, cringe-worthy cloud computing version of the song (and perform it), I'll save myself the embarrassment and instead focus on why "Gamer's Paradise" came to mind in the first place. We announced some amazing stats about two gaming customers that use SoftLayer's cloud infrastructure to power popular online games, and I thought I'd share an interesting observation about that news.

More than 130 million gamers rely on SoftLayer infrastructure. SoftLayer is virtually invisible to those gamers. And that's why gaming companies love us.

When would a gamer care where a game is hosted? Simple: When gameplay is unavailable, lagging, or otherwise underperforming. Because we deliver peak cloud performance consistently for our gaming customers, we'll continue to live in the shadows of gamers' collective consciousness (while taking center stage in the minds of game producers and developers).

It's easy to get caught up in discussing the technical merits of our cloud hosting platform. Speeds and feeds provide great metrics for explaining our infrastructure, but every now and then, it's worthwhile to step back and look at the forest for the trees. Instead of talking about how bare metal resources consistently outperform their virtual server equivalents, let's take a look at why our gaming customers need as much server horsepower as we can provide:

As you can see, the games we're hosting for our customers are a little more resource-intensive than Tic-tac-toe and Pong. By leveraging SoftLayer bare metal infrastructure, gaming companies such as KUULUU and Multiplay can seamlessly support high definition gameplay in massive online environments for gamers around the world. When KUULUU launched their wildly popular LP Recharge Facebook game, they trusted our platform all the way from beta testing through launch, daily play, and updates. When Multiplay needed to support 25,000 new users in Battlefield 4, they spun up dedicated SoftLayer resources in less than four hours. If gamers expect a flawless user experience, you can imagine how attentive to infrastructure needs gaming companies are.

As more and more users sign on to play games online with Multiplay, KUULUU, and other gaming customers on our platform, we'll celebrate crossing even bigger (and more astounding) milestones like the 130 million mark we're sharing today. In the meantime, I'm going to go "check on our customers' servers" with a few hours of gameplay ... You know, for the good of our customers.

-@khazard

More Info: Multiplay and KUULUU Launch Games with SoftLayer, an IBM Company - Gaming companies flock to SoftLayer’s cloud, adding to 130 million players worldwide

Categories: 
January 10, 2014

Platform Improvements: VLAN Management

As director of product development, I'm tasked with providing SoftLayer customers greater usability and self-service tools on our platform. Often, that challenge involves finding, testing, and introducing new products, but a significant amount of my attention focuses on internal projects to tweak and improve our existing products and services. To give you an idea of what that kind of "behind the scenes" project looks like, I'll fill you in on a few of the updates we recently rolled out to improve the way customers interact with and manage their Virtual LANs (VLANs).

VLANs play a significant role in SoftLayer's platform. In the most basic sense, VLANs fool servers into thinking they're behind the same network switch. If you have multiple servers in the same data center and behind the same router, you could have them all on the same VLAN, and all traffic between the servers would be handled at the layer-2 network level. For customers with multi-tier applications, zones can be created to isolate specific servers into separate VLANs — database servers, app servers, and Web servers can all be isolated in their own security partitions to meet specific security and/or compliance requirements.

In the past, VLANs were all issued distinct numbers so that we could logically and consistently differentiate them from each other. That utilitarian approach has proven to be functional, but we noticed an opportunity to make the naming and management of VLANs more customer-friendly without losing that functionality. Because many of our customers operate large environments with multiple VLANs, they've had the challenge of remembering which servers live behind which VLAN number, and the process of organizing all of that information was pretty daunting. Imagine an old telephone switchboard with criss-crossing wires connecting several numbered jacks (and not connecting others). This is where our new improvements come in.

Customers now have the ability to name their VLANs, and we've made updates that increase visibility into the resources (servers, firewalls, gateways, and subnets) that reside inside specific VLANs. In practice, that means you can name your VLAN that houses database servers "DB" or label it to pinpoint a specific department inside your organization. When you need to find one of those VLANs, you can easily search for it by name and make changes to it easily.

VLAN List View

VLAN Naming

VLAN Detail Page

VLAN Naming

While these little improvements may seem simple, they make life much easier for IT departments and sysadmins with large, complex environments. If you don't need this kind of functionality, we don't throw it in your face, but if you do need it, we make it clear and easily accessible.

If you ever come across quirks in the portal that you'd like us to address, please let us know. We love making big waves by announcing new products and services, but we get as much (or more) joy from finding subtle ways to streamline and improve the way our customers interact with our platform.

-Bryce

December 16, 2013

Xplenty: Tech Partner Spotlight

We invite each of our featured SoftLayer Tech Marketplace Partners to contribute a guest post to the SoftLayer Blog, and this week, we're happy to welcome Yaniv Mor from Xplenty. Xplenty is a cloud-based code-free Hadoop as a Service platform that allows you to easily create data workflows, provision, monitor and scale clusters. Their goal is to eliminate the complexity of Hadoop to make it accessible and cost-effective for everyone.

Simplifying Hadoop

Apache Hadoop, open source software developed by Doug Cutting, is the most popular storage and processing platform for big data. Because Hadoop can accommodate structured data, semi-structured data, and unstructured data, it is the storage architecture of choice for some of the Internet's largest and most data-rich sites. Industry giants such as Google and Facebook have been using Hadoop for years to store and deliver information while gathering insights from customer behavior and internal business processes, and their obvious success with the platform has helped drive broad adoption and popularity all the way down to small-businesses and startups.

Specific use cases vary among industries, but similarities exist. Many companies leverage Hadoop to gather information about their clientele. With Hadoop, a company can process huge amounts of data to examine past and present behaviors, and with that information, customers can be presented personally-tailored recommendations, and the business can glean deep insights from the trends and outliers in its customer base. As a result, customers are more likely to make repeat purchases, and companies are able to predict trends and possible risks, allowing them to visualize and prepare for a number of business scenarios.

Another compelling use case for Hadoop is its ability to analyze and report on multi-faceted marketing and advertising campaigns. By drilling down into the guts of a campaign, users can see exactly what worked and what didn't. Marketers and advertisers can direct their resources to the campaigns that worked and let the ineffective ones fall by the wayside.

On the internal side, businesses are using Hadoop to better understand their own information. Data systems at financial companies use it to detect fraud anomalies by comparing transaction details. If you've ever made a credit card purchase in another state or country but the purchase didn't go through, your bank's system probably flagged the transaction for a representative to investigate. Other companies analyze data collected from their networks to monitor activity and diagnose bottlenecks and other issues with a negative impact.

The challenge with leveraging Hadoop's broad potential is that a company generally needs dedicated technical resources to allocate toward building and maintaining the solution — from manpower to financial to infrastructure. Hadoop is difficult to program and requires a very specific skill set that few possess. If a company doesn't have the personnel for the job, it will need to fork over some serious cash to get a system built and maintained. This can significantly hinder the progress of the data and business intelligence teams, and by default, the progress of the company. That's why we decided to create Xplenty.

Xplenty is a coding-free Hadoop-as-a-Service platform that allows data and BI users to process their big data stored on the SoftLayer cloud without having to acquire any special skills. What Xplenty does is remove the need to divert those precious resources from anything other than the business at hand. Xplenty's Hadoop-as-a-Service platform has a graphical user interface that enables the data and BI teams to build data flows without ever having to write a line of code. The benefit of this is twofold. First, the business intelligence analysts can quickly build data flows that would typically take weeks or more to program and debug, and data users can easily insert Xplenty into their data stack to handle processing needs. The second benefit is that since the IT department doesn't have to worry about doing any programming, they are able to tackle more pressing issues, bottlenecks are avoided, and life goes on without a hitch.

Xplenty was created specifically for the cloud, and SoftLayer is a major player in this space, so it was a natural fit for us to partner up to provide a SoftLayer-specific offering that will perform even better for customers already using SoftLayer infrastructure. We only work with providers with the best and most stable infrastructure, and SoftLayer is definitely at the top of the list.

If you want to try Hadoop on Xplenty, jump over to our SoftLayer sign up page, enter your details, and test drive the platform with a free 30-day trial!

- Yaniv Mor, Xplenty

This guest blog series highlights companies in SoftLayer's Technology Partners Marketplace.
These Partners have built their businesses on the SoftLayer Platform, and we're excited for them to tell their stories. New Partners will be added to the Marketplace each month, so stay tuned for many more come.
December 11, 2013

2013 at SoftLayer: Year in Review

I'm going into my third year at SoftLayer and it feels like "déjà vu all over again" to quote Yogi Berra. The breakneck pace of innovation, cloud adoption and market consolidation — it only seems to be accelerating.

The BIG NEWS for SoftLayer was announced in July when we became part of IBM. Plenty has already been written about the significance of this acquisition but as our CEO, Lance Crosby, eloquently put it in an earlier blog, "customers and clients from both companies will benefit from a higher level of choice and a higher level of service from a single partner. More important, the real significance will come as we merge technology that we developed within the SoftLayer platform with the power and vision that drives SmartCloud and pioneer next-generation cloud services."

We view our acquisition as an interesting inflection point for the entire cloud computing industry. The acquisition has ramifications that go beyond IaaS market and include both PaaS and SaaS offerings. As the foundation for IBM's SmartCloud offerings, the one-stop-shop for an entire portfolio of cloud services will resonate for startups and large enterprises alike. We're also seeing a market that is rapidly consolidating and only those with global reach, deep pockets, and an established customer base will survive.

With IBM's support and resources, SoftLayer's plans for customer growth and geographic expansion have hit the fast track. News outlets are already abuzz with our plans to open a new data center facility in Hong Kong in the first quarter of next year, and that's just the tip of the iceberg for our extremely ambitious 2014 growth plans. Given the huge influx of opportunities our fellow IBMers are bringing to the table, we're going to be busy building data centers to stay one step ahead of customer demand.

The IBM acquisition generated enough news to devote an entire blog to, but because we've accomplished so much in 2013, I'd be remiss if I didn't create some space to highlight some of the other significant milestones we achieved this year. The primary reason SoftLayer was attractive to IBM in the first place was our history of innovation and technology development, and many of the product announcements and press releases we published this year tell that story.

Big Data and Analytics
Big data has been a key focus for SoftLayer in 2013. With the momentum we generated when we announced our partnership with MongoDB in December of 2012, we've been able to develop and roll out high-performance bare metal solution designers for Basho's Riak platfomr and Cloudera Hadoop. Server virtualization is a phenomenal boon to application servers, but disk-heavy, I/O-intensive operations can easily exhaust the resources of a virtualized environment. Because Riak and Hadoop are two of the most popular platforms for big data architectures, we teamed up with Basho and Cloudera to engineer server configurations that would streamline provisioning and supercharge the operations of their data-rich environments. From the newsroom in 2013:

  • SoftLayer announced the availability of Riak and Riak Enterprise on SoftLayer's IaaS platform. This partnership with Basho gives users the availability, fault tolerance, operational simplicity, and scalability of Riak combined with the flexibility, performance, and agility of SoftLayer's on-demand infrastructure.
  • SoftLayer announced a partnership with Cloudera to provide Hadoop big data solutions in a bare metal cloud environment. These on-demand solutions were designed with Cloudera best practices and are rapidly deployed with SoftLayer's easy-to-use solution designer tool.

Cutting-Edge Customers
Beyond the pure cloud innovation milestones we've hit this year, we've also seen a few key customers in vertical markets do their own innovating on our platform. These companies run the gamut from next generation e-commerce to interactive marketers and game developers who require high performance cloud infrastructure to build and scale the next leading application or game. Some of these game developers and cutting-edge tech companies are pretty amazing and we're glad we tapped into them to tell our story:

  • Asia's hottest tech companies looking to expand their reach globally are relying on SoftLayer's cloud infrastructure to break into new markets. Companies such as Distil Networks, Tiket.com, Simpli.fi, and 6waves are leveraging SoftLayer's Singapore data center to build out their customer base while enabling them to deliver their application or game to users across the region with extremely low latency.
  • In March, we announced that hundreds of the top mobile, PC and social games with more than 100 million active players, are now supported on SoftLayer's infrastructure platform. Gaming companies -- including Hothead Games, Geewa, Grinding Gear Games, Peak Games and Rumble Entertainment -- are flocking to SoftLayer because they can roll out virtual and bare-metal servers along with a suite of networking, security and storage solutions on demand and in real time.

Industry Recognition
SoftLayer's success and growth is a collective effort, however, it is nice to see our founder and CEO, Lance Crosby get some well-deserved recognition. In August, the Metroplex Technology Business Council (MTBC), the largest technology trade association in Texas, named him the winner of its Corporate CEO of the Year during the 13th Annual Tech Titans Awards ceremony.

The prestigious annual contest recognizes outstanding information technology companies and individuals in the North Texas area who have made significant contributions during the past year locally, as well as to the technology industry overall.

We're using the momentum we've continued building in 2013 to propel us into 2014. An upcoming milestone, just around the corner, will be our participation at Pulse 2014 in late February. At this conference we plan to unveil the ongoing integration efforts taking place between SoftLayer and IBM including how;

  • SoftLayer provides flexible, secure, cloud-based infrastructure for running the toughest and most mission critical workloads on the cloud;
  • SoftLayer is the foundation of IBM PaaS offerings for cloud-native application development and deployment;
  • SoftLayer is the platform for many of IBM SaaS offerings supporting mobile, social and analytic applications. IBM has a growing portfolio of roughly 110 SaaS applications.

Joining forces with IBM will have its challenges but the opportunities ahead looks amazing. We encourage you to watch this space for even more activity next year and join us at Pulse 2014 in Las Vegas.

-Andre

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