Microsoft Still Following the Leader with Bing.com Offering

June 3, 2009

The new search engine “Bing” by the software colossus Microsoft is a sad attempt at capturing some of the search engine traffic that internet superstar Google has dominated for quite some time. Based on the preview video at bing.com, the search engine offers little in new features or innovation, instead catering to the ‘too-lazy-to-click-the-back-button” crowd with expanded link previews from the search results page. I have personally found this type of feature to be near worthless, as information of value is typically more than a few lines from the top. Then again maybe my 5 button mouse has numbed me to the indignation so many users have suffered by having to move the cursor to click the back button after discovering the web page wasn’t quite what they were after. (Google added longer previews in March.)

Microsoft representatives point out the technologic advancement of augmenting the standard fare keyword searches with some semantic based algorithms. This alone should yield significantly better results than the current Microsoft engine, “MSN Live Search.” (Google rolled out its semantic searches months ago.)

Next, Microsoft offers the “Conjecture Circle” to combat Google’s “Wonder Wheel”. OK, I’m just kidding on that one. Besides, it is only June, and Microsoft is still catching up with Google’s March features. They will not be taking on the “Wonder Wheel” until August or September.

I think I see a pattern here! This “innovation” reeks of lag. While taking the conservative copycat approach might be the safe thing for the boys from Redmond, it will never vault them to the front of the line in this market. The turbo boost for technology industries is clearly tied to new ideas and advancement. We see this time and time again as startups bring new whiz-bang tools to market and shoot right past the established giants. Time will of course tell. Fortunately in the fast paced world of the internet, we will not have to wait long it see if Bing will go bang.

Comments

June 4th, 2009 at 2:48pm

They realize the powerhouse Google has become and want to emulate. They want to do to Google what Apple did to them.

June 5th, 2009 at 4:44am

MS says bing is good name, to me their earlier live.con was much better name. Now live redirect to bing.com search result for bing is of same quality as live.com, not relevant as Google search result. Forcing live users to use bing is not good, some may like live.com, now they are forced to use bing

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Comments

June 4th, 2009 at 2:48pm

They realize the powerhouse Google has become and want to emulate. They want to do to Google what Apple did to them.

June 5th, 2009 at 4:44am

MS says bing is good name, to me their earlier live.con was much better name. Now live redirect to bing.com search result for bing is of same quality as live.com, not relevant as Google search result. Forcing live users to use bing is not good, some may like live.com, now they are forced to use bing

Leave a Reply

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