International Posts

September 30, 2014

SELLING SOFTLAYER (in Amsterdam)

Selling SoftLayer services to Internet-centric companies—hosting resellers, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) providers, big data and e-commerce companies—are no-brainers. These companies clearly see the advantages that come with having their servers (the backbone of their business) hosted by a specialist. They switch their capital expenses into variable costs that can be spread over time.

On the flip side are companies in non-Internet-centric industries—banking, health care, oil & gas, and aerospace. How do these companies find value in the IaaS offered by SoftLayer? The IT infrastructure (servers to be precise) accounts for less than 5 percent of their capital expenditure (CAPEX) as opposed to almost 95 percent for Internet-centric companies.

Will the same value proposition work for both Internet-centric and non-Internet-centric companies?

With Internet-centric companies (where servers constitute up to 95 percent of CAPEX), the majority of the workforce is server-savvy. This means there is a very high chance any contact we have with these companies will be with a server-savvy fellow. Selling SoftLayer will then be a question of how SoftLayer’s USPs differentiate from the competition.

The current industry trend is driving a faulty message: The cloud is a commodity.

The truth is: Unlike basic commodities (electricity, gas, or cable), where there is little or no differentiation between what the end user gets irrespective of the provider, cloud and hosting in general are different. This faulty commodity-based assumption drives the price wars in cloud computing.

Comparing apples and oranges cumulus and stratus.

To test and disprove this theory, I brought a customer’s systems engineer (a server expert) into a sales discussion with the CTO.

I requested to put the price negotiations on hold for about 4 hours, and evaluate the services first. To do this, I asked for the exact configuration that the customer had hosted with a competitor. I ordered the exact configuration on the SoftLayer platform and within 2 hours the servers were ready. When the customer’s system engineer tested the performance of the SoftLayer server and compared it to what they had from a competitor, the price comparison was thrown out the window for good.

There are many different facets wherein SoftLayer outperforms the competition but unfortunately, most prospective customers only see price.

For the non-Internet-centric companies, to reach the price discussion is a milestone in itself. Pricing negotiations only begin when the need and suitability (originality) have been established.

The IBM and SoftLayer effect.

As a salesperson, I subscribe to the SCOTSMAN Sales Qualification Matrix (Solution, Competition, Originality, Timescales, Size, Money, Authority, and Need). Most companies in this group need solutions. IaaS is just part of that solution. This is where IBM (Big Blue) comes into the picture. As a service giant in the IT Sector, IBM can and will build on SoftLayer’s IaaS prowess to conquer this landscape. The synergies that are coming from this acquisition will send shockwaves across the industry.

Question is: Will the stakeholders maximize this potential to the fullest?

- Valentine Che, Global Sales, AMS01

September 22, 2014

Becoming a SLayer in Hong Kong

When I came on board at SoftLayer, the company was at the beginning of a growth period. IBM had just invested $1.2 billion to build 15 new data centers all over the world including one in Hong Kong—I was excited to get to work there!

Before I joined the Hong Kong data center’s Go Live Team as a server build tech, I went through a lengthy interview process. At the time, I was working for a multinational bank. But after the Chinese New Year, something inside me said it was time to take on a new challenge. Many people in Chinese cities look for new opportunities around the New Year; they believe it will give them luck and fortune.

After much anticipation (and interviews and paperwork), my first day was finally here. When I arrived at the SoftLayer data center, I walked through glass security doors and was met by Jesse Arnold, SoftLayer’s Hong Kong site manager; Russell Mcguire, SoftLayer’s Go Live Team leader whom I met during my interview process; and Shahzad, my colleague who was also starting work that day.

Shahzad and I felt very welcomed and were excited to be joining the team. During our first-day tour, I took a deep breath and said to myself, “You can do this Ying! This is transition, and we never stop learning new things in life.” Learning new things can be challenging. It involves mental, physical, and emotional strength.

Inside the Data Center: Building Racks!

When our team began to build racks and work with cables it was uncharted, but not totally unfamiliar territory for me. For a time, I worked as a seafarer cadet electrician on a container ship. I have worked with cables, electric motors, and generators before—it was just in the middle of the ocean. So, needless to say I know cables, but SFP cables were new. With the help of my colleagues and the power of the Internet, I was on my way and cabling the data center in no time.

When we build a server, we check everything: the motherboard, processors, RAM, hard drives, and most importantly, OS compatibility. After learning those basics, I started to look at it like a big puzzle that I needed to solve.

Inside the Data Center: Strong Communication!

That wasn’t the only challenge. In order to do my job successfully and adhere to data center build procedures, I had to learn the best way to communicate with my colleagues.

In the data center, our team must relay messages precisely and provide all the details to ensure every step in the build-out process is done correctly. Jesse constantly reminds us what is important: communication, communication, communication. He always repeats it three times to emphasize it as a golden rule. To me, this is one sign of a successful leader. I’m glad Jesse has put a focus on communication because it is helping me learn what makes a good leader and SLayer.

Inside the Data Center: Job Satisfaction!

I am so happy to be working at SoftLayer. All the new challenges I’ve been faced with remind me of Nike’s slogan: Just Do It! And our young team is doing just that. We work six days a week for 14 hours a day. And for all of that time, I use my mental and physical strength to tackle my new job.

I’ve learned so much and am excited to expand the knowledge base I already have, so I can be a stronger asset to the SoftLayer team.

I consider myself a SLayer that is still-in-training because there is more to being a SLayer than just building racks. SLayers are the dedicated people that work at SoftLayer, and they’re my colleagues. As my training continues, I look forward to learning more and to continue gaining more skills. I don't want to get old without learning new things!

For all our readers in Asia below you will find the blog in Mandarin translation!

在我刚刚来到SoftLayer的时候,它正处于发展的初级阶段。那时候,IBM公司正投资了120万在世界各地建立数据中心,其中一个在香港。我非常荣幸我可以在这里工作!

在我加入香港数据中心——Go Live Team,成为一个服务器构建技术员以前,我经历了一个很长的面试过程。当时,我正在为一家跨国银行工作。然而,中国农历新年以后,我的内心告诉我,是时候要迎接新的挑战了。很多中国人在新年的时候寻求新的工作机会,他们相信,这会给他们带来好运和财富。

经过一番前期工作(还有采访和文书工作),我终于迎来了新的第一天。当我来到SoftLayer数据中心的时候,我穿过玻璃安全门,见到了SoftLayer香港站的经理——Jesse Arnold,我曾经采访时遇到的SoftLayer里Go Live Team的组长——Russell Mcguire,还有Shahzad,和我一样第一天开始工作的同事。

Shahzad和我都觉得非常的开心和兴奋能够加入这个组。在我们第一天工作的时候,我深深地吸了一口气,对自己说:你可以做到!这是一个进步的过程。我们从不会停止学习新的东西。学习新的东西是很有挑战性的,它包含了心理、身体和精神的力量。

在数据中心里面:建筑架!
当我们的团队开始构建建筑架和电缆的时候,它们都是新的东西。但不是完全不熟悉它们。以前,我的工作是在集装箱船的海员电工。那时候我的工作和电缆、发动机、发电机打交道,虽然它们都只是在海里,但是,我很确定我了解电缆,我很容易的上手了数据中心的工作。

当我们建立一个服务器的时候,我们得检查每一样东西:主板、处理器、内存、硬盘,还有最重要的,操作系统的兼容性。了解了这些基本的东西以后,我把它当做一个摆在面前的难题,认真地对待。

在数据中心里面:很强的沟通能力!
这并不是唯一的挑战。为了成功地做好我的工作,在建立数据中心的过程中,我必须学会用最佳方式和我的同事沟通。

在数据中心,我们的的团队必须精确地传送信息,并提供所有的细节,以确保扩建过程中每一个步骤正确地完成。Jesse不断地提醒我们,沟通交流是非常重要的。他强调沟通是黄金规则。对我来说,这是一个成功领导者的标志之一。我很高兴Jesse已经把重点放在沟通作为重点,因为它帮助我学习,什么是一名优秀的领导者。

在数据中心里面:工作满意度!
我很高兴可以在SoftLayer工作。面对所以新的挑战,我都度自己说:放手去做!我们年轻的团队都在努力。我们每周工作六天,每天14小时。那段时间内,我把我所有的精力都投入到了我的新工作中。

我从我的经历中学到了很多,增长了很多知识。所以我可以说,我给SoftLayer团队带来了价值。

我把自己当做一个让在学习进步的技术员,因为一个技术员不仅仅要会构架。精英是在SoftLayer执着工作的人们,他们是我的同事。由于我正处于训练学习阶段,我期待学习更多知识和技能。活到老,学到老!

- Ying

September 17, 2014

SoftLayer Asia Roadshow Kick-starts its 5 City Tour

To help developers understand the benefits of the cloud and how to make their business scalable with the Softlayer environment, SoftLayer, in partnership with e27, is excited to announce the SoftLayer Asia Roadshow. The roadshow will stop in five cities:

  • Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia — October 1, 2014
  • Jakarta, Indonesia — October 3, 2014
  • Hong Kong — October 8, 2014
  • Bangkok, Thailand — October 10, 2014
  • Singapore — October 15, 2014

Designed as a half-day workshop with SoftLayer product and technical mentors, attendees will interact with instructors on how SoftLayer solutions scale and perform the way they do. The team will also take you through real business cases of how technical teams improved their performances in industries such as e-commerce, social media, and mobile gaming.

What you can expect at the workshop:

  • Practical and technical advice that you can apply immediately to help resolve trouble spots and improve performance in your organization’s IT environment
  • Learn how SoftLayer servers are provisioned so that you can build your own public and private node virtual servers
  • Learn and leverage SoftLayer Application Programming Interface (API) to interact with your account, products, and services

Who you will meet:

SoftLayer Road Show

Interested?

If you are a startup, developer, or an entrepreneur looking to hone your cloud skills then this workshop is for you. Since there are limited seats in each location, visit www.e27.co/softlayer to register, and the team will get back to you.

-Namrata

August 20, 2014

SoftLayer is in Canada, eh?

Last week, we celebrated the official launch of our Toronto (TOR01) data center—the fourth new SoftLayer data center to go live in 2014, and our first in Canada! To catch you up on our progress this year, we unveiled a data center in Hong Kong in June to provide regional redundancy in Asia. In July, we added similar redundancy in Europe with the grand opening of our London data center, and we cut the ribbon on a SoftLayer data center designed specifically for federal workloads in Richardson, TX. The new Toronto location joins our data center pods in Washington, D.C., as our second location in the northeast region of North America.

As you can imagine, our development and operations teams have been working around the clock to get these new facilities built, so they were fortunate to have Tim Hortons in Toronto to keep them going. Fueled by countless double-doubles and Timbits, they officially brought TOR01 online August 11! This data center launch is part of IBM’s massive $1.2 billion commitment to in expanding our global cloud footprint. A countless number of customers have asked us when we were going to open a facility in Canada, so we prioritized Toronto to meet that demand. And because the queue had been building for so long, as soon as the doors were opened, we had a flood of new orders to fulfill. Many of these customers expressed a need for data residency in Canada to handle location-sensitive workloads, and expanding our private network into Canada means in the region will see even better network performance to SoftLayer facilities around the world.

Here are what a few of our customer had to say about the Toronto launch:

Brenda Crainic, CTO and co-founder of Maegan said, “We are very excited to see SoftLayer open a data center in Toronto, as we are now expanding our customer base in Canada. We are looking forward to host all our data in Canada, in addition to their easy-to-use services and great customer service."

Frederic Bastien, CEO at mnubo says, “We are very pleased to have a data center in Canada. Our customers value analytics performance, data residency and privacy, and deployment flexibility—and with SoftLayer we get all that and a lot more! SoftLayer is a great technology partner for our infrastructure needs.”

With our new data center, we’re able to handle Canadian infrastructure needs from A to Zed.

While we’d like to stick around and celebrate with a Molson Canadian or two, our teams are off to the next location to get it online and ready. Where will it be? You won’t have to wait very long to find out.

I’d like to welcome the new Canucks (both employees and customers) to SoftLayer. If you’re interested in getting started with a bare metal or virtual server in Canada, we’re running a limited-time launch promotion that’ll save up to $500 on your first order in Toronto: Order Now!

-John

P.S. I included a few Canadianisms in this post. If you need help deciphering them, check out this link.

August 7, 2014

Deploy or Die

“Forget about being a futurist, become a now-ist.” With those words, Joi Ito, the director of the MIT Media Lab, ends his most recent talk at TED. What thrills me the most is his encouragement to apply agile principles throughout any innovation process, and creating in the moment, building quickly and improving constantly is the story we’ve been advocating at SoftLayer for a long while.

Joi says that this new approach is possible thanks to the Internet. I actually want to take it further. Because the Internet has been around a lot longer than these agile principles, I argue that the real catalyst for the startups and technology disruptors we see nowadays was the widespread, affordable availability of cloud resources. The chance of deploying infrastructure on demand without long-term commitments, anywhere in the world, and with an option to scale it up and down on the fly decreased the cost of innovation dramatically. And fueling that innovation has always been raison d'être of SoftLayer.

Joi compares two innovation models: the before the Internet (I will go ahead and replace “Internet” with “cloud,” which I believe makes the case even stronger) and the new model. The world seemed to be much more structured before the cloud, governed by a certain set of rules and laws. When the cloud happened, it became very complex, low cost, and fast, with Newtonian rules being often defied.

Before, creating something new would cost millions of dollars. The process started with commercial minds, aka MBAs, who’d write a business plan, look for money to support it, and then hire designers and engineers to build the thing. Recently, this MBA-driven model has flipped: first designers and engineers build a thing, then they look for money from VCs or larger organizations, then they write a business plan, and then they move on to hiring MBAs.

A couple of months ago, I started to share this same observation more loudly. In the past, if an organization wanted to bring something new to the market, or just make iteration to the existing offering, it involved a lot of resources, from time, to people, to supporting infrastructure. Only a handful of ideas, after cumbersome fights with processes, budget restrictions, and people (and their egos), got to see the daylight. Change was a luxury.

Nowadays the creators are people who used to be in the shadows, mainly taking instructions from “management” and spinning the hamster wheel they were put on. Now, the “IT crowd” no longer sits in the basements of their offices. They are creating new revenue streams and becoming driving forces within their organizations, or they are rolling out their own businesses as startup founders. There is a whole new breed of technology entrepreneurs thriving on what the cloud offers.

Coming back to the TED talk, Joi brings great examples proving that this new designers/engineers-driven model has pushed innovation to the edges and beyond not only in software development, but also in manufacturing, medicine, and other disciplines. He describes bottom-up innovation as democratic, chaotic, and hard to control, where traditional rules don’t apply anymore. He replaces the demo-or-die motto with a new one: deploy or die, stating that you have to bring something to the real world for it to really count.

He walks us through the principles behind the new way of doing things, and for each of those, without any hesitation, I can add, “and that’s exactly what the cloud enables” as an ending to each statement:

  • Principle 1: Pull Over Push is about pulling the resources from the network as you need them, rather than stocking them in the center and controlling everything. And that’s exactly what the cloud enables.
  • Principle 2: Learning Over Education means drawing conclusions and learning on the go—not from static information, but by experimenting, testing things in real life, playing around with your idea, seeing what comes out of it, and applying the lessons moving forward. And that’s exactly what the cloud enables.
  • Principle 3: Compass Over Maps calls out the high cost of writing a plan or mapping the whole project, as it usually turns out not to be very accurate nor useful in the unpredictable world we live in. It’s better not to plan the whole thing with all the details ahead, but to know the direction you’re headed and leave yourself the freedom of flexibility, to adjust as you go, taking into account the changes resulting from each step. And that’s exactly what the cloud enables.

I dare to say that all the above is the true power of cloud without fluff, leaving you with an easy choice when facing the deploy-or-die dilemma.

- Michalina

August 6, 2014

Healthy Startups: HealthXL Global Gathering in Dublin

We’ve all heard nightmare stories about the health care industry. The combination of insurance companies, health care providers, government regulation, and literal “life and death” situations can make for a contentious environment. And with the outdated policies and procedures that permeate the industry, it’s a perfect opportunity for innovation.

When I met Martin Kelly of HealthXL a few months ago, I was intrigued by what he was building. He saw the need for innovation in health care, and he started looking around for the startups that were focusing on these kinds of issues. And while he encountered several groups with a health care focus, no one really took the lead to connect them all together to collaborate or strategize about how startups can really change health care. I mean REALLY change it.

Martin, a former IBMer, is super-passionate about innovation in technology for the health care industry, so he leveraged the IBM network and the relationships he built during his time at IBM to address a few simple questions:

  • What needs to happen in health care, through technology, to make the experience and the system better for us all?
  • What is the moonshot that needs to happen for true innovation to happen?

The group he brought together consisted of experts from enterprise companies like the Cleveland Clinic, ResMed, and Johnson & Johnson as well as startup influencers in the health care community like Aussie Jason Berek-Lewis of HealthyStartups and Silicon Valley Bank.

And when those different viewpoints came together, he realized the questions weren’t quite as “simple” as he expected.

Martin invited me to join the conversation for three days at the HealthXL Global Gathering in Dublin to hear what global leaders in the industry are saying about health care. And boy … was I surprised.

To their credit, these leaders (and their respective companies) are very willing and capable to innovate. They feel the pain of heavy administrative responsibilities, often involving duplication and triplication of work. They know how hard it is to track patients from different systems as they change jobs, insurance companies, and providers. They struggle with not being able to communicate effectively with insurance providers. And they fully understand how over-commoditized health care has become as well as its decentralization of focus from patients.

The bottom line: They feel the pain of not having the right technology to run more efficient, cost-effective, and patient-centered health care businesses. They’ve seen the finance industry integrate technology over the past few years, but they're somewhat unsure of what that could look like for them. This can only mean that there are huge opportunities for startups and innovative technologies.

I couldn’t help but consider of how nicely these conversations fit in with the Sprint Mobile Health Accelerator powered by our friends at TechStars that @andy_mui and I visited in March. The conversations inside that accelerator are the missing pieces to the conversations that companies like the Cleveland Clinic and Johnson & Johnson were having. Those enterprises have the opportunity to invest in early stage entrepreneurs and born-on-the-Web startups to incubate technologies and solutions that would prove in time to make their businesses more profitable and efficient.

But the biggest opportunity is what that means for patients.

The most telling story to play out over the next 10 years will be whether the largest health care providers and other businesses will approach these market opportunities in pursuit of cultivating a health care system that prioritizes patients. After hearing the conversation at the HealthXL accelerator global summit, that’s the ultimate challenge.

The startup ecosystem is full of entrepreneurs and teams that can deliver on the goal of improving health care while secondarily (and in some cases indirectly) improving the way heath care businesses run. These efficiencies will result in MORE clients, customers, partners, and profitability in the end, but they may require some hefty changes at the outset. Will the industry allow itself to admit what it doesn’t know?

I am excited to see where this goes. In a few years, I think we’re going to consider Martin Kelly as a key builder of this movement, and more and more businesses will be turning to him for answers to the most important of all questions: “How do we do this?”

We’re excited to be able to support Martin and all of the health care startups in the marketplace today. What will the future of health care look like when these innovators and entrepreneurs are done with it?

The possibilities are endless.

-@JoshuaKrammes

July 14, 2014

London Just Got Cloudier—LON02 is LIVE!

Summer at SoftLayer is off to a great start. As of today, customers can order SoftLayer servers in our new London data center! This facility is SoftLayer's second data center in Europe (joining Amsterdam in the region), and it's one of the most anticipated facilities we've ever opened.

London is the second SoftLayer data center to go live this year, following last month's data center launch in Hong Kong. In January, IBM committed to investing $1.2 billion to expand our cloud footprint, and it's been humbling and thrilling at the same time to prepare for all of this growth. And this is just the beginning.

When it comes to the Europe, Middle East, and Africa region (EMEA), SoftLayer's largest customer base is in the U.K. For the last two and a half years I’ve been visiting London quite frequently, and I've met hundreds of customers who are ecstatic to finally have a SoftLayer data center in their own backyard. As such, I'm especially excited about this launch. With this data center launch, they get our global platform with a local address.

The SoftLayer Network

Customers with location-sensitive workloads can have their data reside within the U.K. Customers with infrastructure in Amsterdam can use London to add in-region redundancy to their environments. And businesses that target London's hyper-competitive markets can deliver unbelievable performance to their users. LON02 is fully integrated with the entire SoftLayer platform, so bare metal and virtual servers in the new data center are seamlessly connected to servers in every other SoftLayer data center around the world. As an example of what that means in practice, you can replicate or integrate data between servers in London and Amsterdam data centers with stunning transfer speeds. For free. You can run your databases on bare metal in London, keep backups in Amsterdam, spin up virtual servers in Asia and the U.S. And your end users get consistent, reliable performance—as though the servers were in the same rack. Try beating that!

London is a vibrant, dynamic, and invigorating city. It's consistently voted one of the best places for business in the region. It's considered a springboard for Europe, attracting more foreign investors than any other location in the region. A third of world’s largest companies are headquartered in London, and with our new data center, we're able to serve them even more directly. London is also the biggest tech hub in-region and the biggest incubator for technology startups and entrepreneurs in Europe. These cloud-native organizations have been pushing the frontiers of technology, building their businesses on our Internet-scale platform for years, so we're giving them an even bigger sandbox to play in. My colleagues from Catalyst, our startup program, have established solid partnerships with organizations such as Techstars, Seedcamp and Wayra UK, so (as you can imagine) this news is already making waves in the U.K. startup universe.

For me, London will always be the European capitol of marketing and advertising (and a strong contender for the top spot in the global market). In fact, two thirds of international advertising agencies have their European headquarters in London, and the city boasts the highest density of creative firms of any other city or region in the world. Because digital marketing and advertising use cases are some of the most demanding technological workloads, we're focused on meeting the needs of this market. These customers require speed, performance, and global reach, and we deliver. Can you imagine RTB (real-time-bidding) with network lag? An ad pool for multinationals that is accessible in one region, but not so much in another? A live HD digital broadcast to run on shared, low-I/O machines? Or a 3D graphic rendering based on a purely virtualized environment? Just thinking about those scenarios makes me cringe, and it reinforces my excitement for our new data center in London.

MobFox, a customer who happens to be the largest mobile ad platform in Europe and in the top five globally, shares my enthusiasm. MobFox operates more than 150 billion impressions per month for clients including Nike, Heineken, EA, eBay, BMW, Netflix, Expedia, and McDonalds (as a comparison I was told that Twitter does about 7 billion+ a month). Julian Zehetmayr, the brilliant 23-year-old CEO of MobFox, agreed that London is a key location for businesses operating in digital advertising space and expressed his excitement about the opportunity we’re bringing his company.

I could go on and on about why this news is soooo good. But instead, I'll let you experience it yourself. Order bare metal or virtual servers in London, and save $500 on your first month service.

Celebrate a cloudy summer in London!

-Michalina

May 20, 2014

The Next Next

Last month in Europe, I had a chance to participate is some interesting discussions at The Next Web (TNW) Europe and NEXT Berlin conferences. The discussions centered around where we are on the curve of technology development, what the scene looks like now, and what the future holds. TNW Europe inspired me to share my thoughts here on the topic of inevitable market evolution, in particular which aspects will be instrumental in this progress and the empowering phenomenon of embracing the possibility to fail and change.

Attending NEXT Berlin boosted my confidence about those conclusions and motivated me to write a few words of a follow up. Connected cars, or “new mobility,” Internet of Things, smart houses, e-health, and digitalized personal medicine, application of cloud and big data in various industries from automotive, to home appliances, to army, and to FMCG, all are proof that the world is changing at a stunning pace. And all that is fueled by the evolution of organizations and how they set up their IT, hosting strategies and environments.

The most invigorating talk, in my opinion, at NEXT Berlin was given by Peter Hinssen. His keynote on The New Normal gave the audience a couple solid “ah” and “ha” moments. Here are some of the highlights I took away from the talk:

  • Technology is not only relevant to (almost) every aspect of our lives; it is in fact obvious, if not commoditized. Digital is present everywhere, from grocery shopping, to stopping at traffic lights, to visiting a dentist office, to jogging, to going to the movies, to sharing holidays greetings with our friends, to drinking fresh water from our taps, and so on. Technology we use privately usually surpasses what we use at work. The moment we receive access to something new, we immediately expect that to be working seamlessly and we get irritated if it doesn’t (think: national coverage of LTE, Wi-Fi available on board of aircrafts, streamed HD on-demand television, battery life of smart devices). We take technology for granted, not because we’re arrogant, but because it is omnipresent.
  • Information and technology are becoming equally available to all, leveling the landscape and helping organizations stay ahead and constantly re-invent themselves. Access to data and new tools is no longer a privilege and luxury that only the biggest fish can afford. Nowadays, thanks to an expansive spectrum of as-a-service offerings, every organization can get an insight of their buyers’ attitudes and behaviors and change accordingly to gain competitive advantage. Those who resist to constantly remodel the way they operate and serve the market, will be quickly outrun by dozens of those who understand the value of being agile.
  • Organizations and markets run on two different clocks: one is internal, the other is external, and very often they are unsynchronized. The bigger the gap between the clocks, the less chance for that organizations survival. People learn new technologies very fast and become their users faster in private than professional space. Legacy processes, miscommunication, misperception, and sometimes ignorance overshadow the reality that the progress is on a slower lane when it comes to business. The development is unstoppable and it keeps on becoming more complex and more intense. Not to fall behind, organization need to become ‘fluid’ to respond real-time to those flux conditions.
  • Society and markets are operating as networks. In order to serve them efficiently, businesses need to reorganize their structures to operate as networks. With the dominance of social, the typical organizational hierarchy is detached from buyer’s mentality. In our private lives, we trust more of our peers, we give more credibility to influencers who have solid network of followers, and best ideas are fueled by different, unrelated sources. Applying the same principles to professional environments, restructuring the organizational chart from top-down reporting lines to more of a network topography, hence going beyond traditional divisions, silos, and clusters, will boost the internal creativity and innovation.
  • Information is not a pool with a fixed option to “read” and “write “anymore. It is actually fluid and should be seen more as a river with infinite number of branches and customers sitting at the heart of each cluster. It is not an organization who decides what and when is being said and known. The discretion belongs to users and buyers, who share widely their insights, reviews, likes, and opinions and whose recommendations—either coming from an individual or in an aggregated form—are much more powerful. At the same time that set of information is not static, but dynamic. Organizations should respect, embrace, and adapt actively to that flow.

Peter claims we’re probably not even half way down the S curve of that transformation. Being part of it, seeing those disruptive organizations grow on our platform, having a chance to talk to so many smart people from all over the world who shape the nowadays societies and redefine businesses, is one of the most thrilling aspects of working for SoftLayer. Even if my grandma still associates cloud with weather conditions, I know my kids will be all “no way” once I tell them a story of how we were changing the world.

Wondering what will be the age test for them…

- Michalina

April 29, 2014

The Media Industry is Making the Move to Cloud

Rumor has it that at the entire rendering of James Cameron’s “Avatar” using 3DFusion required more than 1 petabyte of storage space. This is equivalent to 500 hard drives of 2 terabytes each, or a 32 year-long MP3 file! The computing power behind this would consist of about 34 racks, each with 4 chassis containing 32 machines. All of that adds up to roughly 40,000 processors and 104 terabytes of RAM.

High-res, long-form media files that can reach hundreds of gigabytes of storage are regular phenomena in the media industry. Whether it’s making the next “Avatar” or creating the next big, viral ad campaign, technology is fundamental to the media industry. But, the investment required to set these up is enough to boggle the mind and dissuade even the high risk-takers. So, why buy when you can rent?

Cloud allows you to rent, own, use, and return the infrastructure with no capex. That gives users access to unlimited compute power, including servers, network, storage, firewalls, and ancillary services, all available on demand, with pay-as-you-go billing offered hourly or monthly.

Cloud services are an increasingly viable avenue for the industry to leverage and support the performance needs of online media storage, as well as collaboration environment. The benefits of a customizable approach to the cloud include: digital archives, production support, broadcast facility resiliency, high-intensity processing, and derivatives manufacturing for transcoding and encrypting. An on-demand, scalable infrastructure is the next step toward reducing production and operations costs, simplifying data access, and delivering content faster to the end user.

This year at ad:tech asean, SoftLayer will present on how the media industry is utilizing cloud infrastructure. So, I thought this would be a good opportunity to share some interesting customer stories about media companies at the top of their games and successfully growing their businesses on the cloud. Here are two of those stories.

The Loft Group, an Australian creative digital agency, specializes in creating e-learning campaigns for global brands. The company won a contract with cosmetics giant L’Oreal but realized that in order to go big with their platform, they needed technology that provided their support team with the necessary analytics. The Loft Group selected SoftLayer as the cloud platform for its digital e-learning campaigns. Moving their services to the cloud helped the company achieve global scale, consistent performance across multiple countries and grow at a pace which slashed a 3- to 5-year transformation timeline down to just months.

According to eMarketer’s forecast, global e-commerce sales will top $1.2 trillion by 2016. That growth is projected to continue by 20 percent every year. Ad personalization is playing a larger part in maximizing e-commerce business. To keep up with the demands of real-time ad personalization, companies like Struq, an ad personalization platform, require an infrastructure that can process high volumes at high speeds.

Struq offers highly targeted ad campaigns across a range of promotional platforms. The company often handles more than 2 terabytes of raw event data every day, processing more than 95 percent of requests in fewer than 30 milliseconds. And when the company’s growing European customer base demanded immediate server allocation, Struq turned to SoftLayer for scalability. We were able to offer on-demand provisioning as well as the low latency their customers required. A detailed story of how Struq achieved the requisite scalability and success with SoftLayer is available here.

More stories to come, so stay tuned! In the meantime, you can hear more customer stories during the first leg of ad:tech asean, a prelim roadshow in Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur and Bangkok.

-@namrata_kapur

January 17, 2014

What's Next? $1.2 Billion Investment. 15 New Data Centers.

SoftLayer was founded in a living room on May 5, 2005. We bootstrapped our vision of becoming the de facto platform for cloud computing by maxing out our credit cards and draining our savings accounts. Over the course of eight years, we built a unique global offering, and in the middle of last year, our long-term vision was validated (and supercharged) by IBM.

When I posted about IBM acquiring SoftLayer last June, I explained that becoming part of IBM "will enable us to continue doing what we've done since 2005, but on an even bigger scale and with greater opportunities." To give you an idea of what "bigger scale" and "greater opportunities" look like, I need only direct you to today's press release: IBM Commits $1.2 Billion to Expand Global Cloud Footprint.

IBM Cloud Investment

It took us the better part of a decade to build a worldwide network of 13 data centers. As part of IBM, we'll more than double our data center footprint in a fraction of that time. In 2006, we were making big moves when we built facilities on the East and West coasts of the United States. Now, we're expanding into places like China, Hong Kong, London, Japan, India, Canada and Mexico City. We had a handful of founders pushing for SoftLayer's success, and now we've got 430,000+ IBM peers to help us reach our goal. This is a whole new ballgame.

The most important overarching story about this planned expansion is what each new facility will mean for our customers. When any cloud provider builds a data center in a new location, it's great news for customers and users in that geographic region: Content in that facility will be geographically closer to them, and they'll see lower pings and better performance from that data center. When SoftLayer builds a data center in a new location, customers and users in that geographic region see performance improvements from *all* of our data centers. The new facility serves as an on-ramp to our global network, so content on any server in any of our data centers can be accessed faster. To help illustrate that point, let's look at a specific example:

If you're in India, and you want to access content from a SoftLayer server in Singapore, you'll traverse the public Internet to reach our network, and the content will traverse the public Internet to get back to you. Third-party peering and transit providers pass the content to/from our network and your ISP, and you'll get the content you requested.

When we add a SoftLayer data center in India, you'll obviously access servers in that facility much more quickly, and when you want content from a server in our Singapore data center, you'll be routed through that new data center's network point of presence in India so that the long haul from India to Singapore will happen entirely on the private network we control and optimize.

Users around the world will have faster, more reliable access to servers in every other SoftLayer data center because we're bringing our network to their front doors. When you combine that kind connectivity and access with our unique hybrid offering of powerful bare metal servers and scalable virtual server instances, it's easy to see how IBM, the most powerful technology company of the last 100 years, is positioned to remain the most powerful technology company in the world for the next century.

Now it's time to get to work.

-@lavosby

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