International Posts

April 26, 2016

Cloud. Ready-to-Wear.

It’s been five years since I started my journey with SoftLayer. And what a journey it has been—from being one of the first few folks in our Amsterdam office, to becoming part of the mega-family of IBMers; from one data center in Europe to six on this side of the pond and 40+ around the globe; from “Who is SoftLayer?” (or my favorite, “SoftPlayer”), to becoming a cloud environment fundamental for some of the biggest and boldest organizations worldwide.

But the most thrilling difference between 2016 and 2011 that I’ve been observing lately is a shift of the market’s perception of cloud, which matters are important to adopters, and the technology itself becoming mainstream.

Organizations of all sizes—small, medium, and large, while still raising valid questions around the level of control and security—are more often talking about challenges regarding managing the combined on-prem and shared environments, readiness of their legacy applications to migrate to cloud, and their staff competency to orchestrate the new architecture.

At Cloud Expo 2016 (the fifth one for the SoftLayer EMEA team), next to two tremendous keynotes given by Sebastian Krause, General Manager IBM Cloud Europe, and by Rashik Parmar, Lead IBM Cloud Advisor/Europe IBM Distinguished Engineer, we held a roundtable to discuss the connection between hybrid cloud and agile business. Moderated by Rashik Parmar, the discussion confirmed the market’s evolution: from recognizing cloud as technology still proving its value, to technology critical in gaining a competitive advantage in today’s dynamic economy.

Rashik’s guests had deep technology backgrounds and came from organizations of all sizes and flavors—banking, supply chain managements, ISV, publishing, manufacturing, MSP, insurance, and digital entertainment, to name a few. Most of them already have live cloud deployments, or they have one ready to go into production this year.

When it came to the core factors underlying a move into the cloud, they unanimously listed gaining business agility and faster time-to-market. For a few minutes, there was a lively conversation among the panelists about the cost and savings. They raised examples citing  poorly planned cloud implementations that were 20-30 percent more costly than keeping the legacy IT setup. Based on an example of a large Australian bank, Rashik urged companies to start the process of moving into cloud with a vigilant map of their own application’s landscape before thinking about remodeling the architecture to accommodate cloud.

The next questions the panelists tackled pertained to the drivers behind building hybrid cloud environments, which included:

  • Starting with some workloads and building a business case based on their success; from there, expanding the solution organization-wide
  • Increasing the speed of market entry for new solutions and products
  • Retiring certain legacy applications on-prem, while deploying new ones on cloud
  • Regulatory requirements that demand some workloads or data to remain on-prem.

When asked to define “hybrid cloud,” Rashik addressed the highly ambiguous term by simply stating that it refers to any combination of software-defined environment and automation with traditional IT.

The delegates discussed the types of cloud—local, dedicated, and shared—and found it difficult to define who controls hybrid cloud, and who is accountable for what component when something goes wrong. There was a general agreement that many organizations still put physical security over the digital one, which is not entirely applicable in the world of cloud.

Rashik explored, from his experience, where most cases of migrating into cloud usually originate. He referred to usage patterns and how organizations become agile with hybrid IT. The delegates agreed that gaining an option of immediate burstability and removing the headache of optimal resource management, from hardware to internal talent, are especially important.

Rashik then addressed the inhibitors of moving into cloud—and here’s the part that inspired me to write this post. While mentions of security (data security and job security) and the control over the environment arose, the focus repeatedly shifted toward the challenges of applications being incompatible with cloud architecture, complicated application landscape, and scarcity of IT professionals skilled in managing complex (hybrid) cloud environments.

This is a visible trend that demonstrates the market has left the cloud department store’s changing room, and ready not only to make the purchase, but “ready to wear” the new technology with a clear plan where, when, and with an aim to achieve specific outcomes.

The conversation ended with energizing insights about API-driven innovation that enables developers to assemble a wide spectrum of functions, as opposed to being “just a coder.” Other topics included cognitive computing that bridges digital business with digital intelligence, and platforms such as blockchain that are gaining momentum.

To think that not so long ago, I had to explain to the average Cloud Expo delegate what “IaaS” stand for. We’ve come a long way.

 

-Michalina

February 10, 2016

The Compliance Commons: Do you know our ISOs?

Editor’s note: This is the first of a three-part series designed to address general compliance topics and to answer frequently asked compliance questions.

How many times have you been asked by a customer if SoftLayer is ISO compliant?  Do you ever find yourself struggling for an immediate answer?  If so, you're not alone. 

ISO stands for International Organization for Standardization. The organization has published more than 19,000 international standards, covering almost all aspects of technology and business. If you have any questions about a specific ISO standard, you can search the ISO website. If you would like the full details of any ISO standard, an online copy of the standard can be purchased through their website. 

SoftLayer holds three ISO certifications, and we’re going after more. We offer industry standard best security practices relating to cloud infrastructure, including: 

ISO/IEC 27001: This certification covers the information security management process. It certifies that SoftLayer offers best security practices in the industry relating to cloud infrastructure as a service (IaaS). Going through this process and obtaining certification means that SoftLayer observes industry best practices in offering a safe and secure place to live in the cloud. It also means that our information security management practices adhere to strict, internationally recognized best practices.

ISO/IEC 27018: This certifies that SoftLayer follows the most stringent code of practice for protection of personally identifiable information (PII) in public clouds acting as PII processors. It establishes commonly accepted control objectives, controls, and guidelines for implementing measures to protect PII in accordance with the privacy principles in ISO/IEC 29100 for the public cloud computing environment. While not all of SoftLayer is public and while we have very distinct definitions for processing PII for customers, we decided to obtain the certification to solidify our security and privacy principles as robust.

ISO/IEC 27017: This is a code of practice for information security controls for cloud services.  It’s the global standard for cloud security practices—not only for what SoftLayer should do, but also for what our customers should do to protect information. SoftLayer’s ISO 27017 certification demonstrates our continued commitment to upholding the highest, most secure information security controls and applying them effectively and efficiently to our cloud infrastructure environment. The standard provides guidance in, but not limited to, the following areas:

  • Information Security
  • Human Resources
  • Asset Management
  • Access Control
  • Cryptography
  • Physical and Environmental Security
  • Operations Security
  • Communications Security
  • System Acquisition, Development & Maintenance
  • Supplier Relations
  • Incident Management
  • Business Continuity Management
  • Compliance
  • Network Security

How can SoftLayer’s ISO certification benefit me as a customer?

Customers can leverage SoftLayer’s certifications as long as it’s done in the proper manner. Customers cannot claim that they’re ISO certified just because they’re using SoftLayer infrastructure. That’s not how it works. SoftLayer’s ISO certifications may make it easier for customers to become certified because they can leverage our certification for the SoftLayer boundary. Our SOC2 report (available through our customer portal or sales team) describes our boundary in greater detail: the customers are not responsible for certifying what’s inside SoftLayer’s boundary.  

ISO File

How does SoftLayer prove its ISO compliance?

SoftLayer’s ISO Certificates of Registration are publicly available on our website and on our third-party assessor’s website. By design, our ISO certificates denote that we conform to and meet all the applicable objectives of each standard. Since the ISO standards are steadfast and constant controls for everyone, we don’t offer our reports from the audits, but we can provide our certificates.

What SoftLayer data centers are applicable to the ISO certifications?

All of them! Each ISO certificate is applicable to every one of our data centers, in the U.S. and internationally. SoftLayer obtained ISO certifications on every one of our facilities because we operate with consistency across the globe. When a new SoftLayer data center comes online, there is some lag time between opening and certification because we need to be reviewed by our third-party assessor and have operational evidence available to support our data center certification. But as soon as we obtain the certifications, we’ll make them available.

Visit www.softlayer.com/compliance for a full list of our certifications and reports. They can also be found through the customer portal.

-Dana

 

January 15, 2016

Vuukle: Helping Publishers Manage Comments and Match Readers with Content

I recently had a conversation with Ravi Mittal, the founder of a company called Vuukle. Vuukle is based in New Delhi and has just graduated from our Catalyst startup program.

Vuukle actually started out in Silicon Valley—Ravi launched his first product iteration with the goal of trying to source public opinion on the Web. Key to his initial offering was a proprietary algorithm he developed to sort comments in order of credibility—a highly valuable aspect of the product, but something he quickly learnt wasn’t enough value to encompass a product.

Through experiments with Vuukle’s early customers (including the Santa Clara Weekly), a major problem emerged which appeared to pervade the online publishing industry: reader engagement wasn’t sticky enough to compel them to post (and reply to) comments. In order to solve this meta-problem, Vuukle pivoted into a new type of comment publishing system, which helps publishers see engagement through custom analytics.

The major problem Vuukle faces is not unique to just the publishers they service. It’s a pretty large scale global problem, extending beyond news publishers and into all content-based publishing online—so you can imagine how much competition is out there around the globe in this space. When I asked Ravi how he differentiates Vuukle from recently dominant players like Livefyre and Disqus, he offered, "Most customers aren’t using those other services; they have their own commenting systems. If anything, we were pitted against Facebook commenting. In the few cases where Disqus is being used, we’ve seen problems with load times, throttling limits and so on."

In order to set Vuukle in a class of its own, Ravi and his team—which is globally dispersed, with people in Egypt, the Ukraine, U.S.A., and India—have architected an infrastructure for super-fast load times that work at amazing scale, employing SoftLayer servers in our Singapore and India data centers, as well as working with a third party, ScaleDB, to handle database queries and traffic. Of course, that alone doesn’t give them a unique value proposition; Vuukle truly sets itself apart by dropping publisher costs upfront to a minimal platform access fee and offering a 50/50 revenue share model. Vuukle not only is set up to handle high traffic websites with commenting, but it also promotes user engagement with comments by integrating with actual publishing systems. Vuukle passes traffic between posts and offers editors insights into how readers are commenting, in addition to creating a new revenue stream through comments—from which it sources the majority of its own income.

Interestingly, Ravi’s move from the Valley to India came because of family reasons and ended up being a blessing to the business. Early after his move, he realized that there was a ton of opportunity for Vuukle with the major Indian newspapers that had cobbled together their own infrastructure to power websites. Just a couple years in, Vuukle is powering comments on The Hindu, Deccan Chronicle, and Indian Express, three of the most highly trafficked news websites in the country. To help global adoption amongst all sorts of publishers, Vuukle also offers a free WordPress plugin.

Vuukle seems to have gained traction through Ravi’s hard work chasing customers at home, and he’s proud to be finding success despite being bootstrapped. When questioned about the local startup scene, Ravi said, “Nothing much is unique in the Indian startup ecosystem. [It's] kind of like a gold rush in India, where founders are hunting for investment before they have a clear market path and products that are market-ready. A lot of copycat businesses [are] launching that are focused on Indian markets (taking models from the States and elsewhere.) Not many patents are being filed in India—not much actual innovation, indicative of a proliferation of large seed round raises (around $1 million) and a lot of startups spend funding on staff they don’t need.”

The future seems bright for Vuukle. Its growth beyond India’s borders will happen soon and will be financed through revenue rather than venture capital rounds, of which Ravi seems quite wary. Now that Vuukle has graduated from Catalyst, I was keen to hear whether the company would still keep the majority of their infrastructure with IBM—it turns out prospective Vuukle customers love hearing that their infrastructure is hosted on our cloud and that a core aspect of Vuukle’s value proposition is the scale and reliability we offer their solution.

I really think this company is an exciting one to watch. I look forward to seeing greater success for Vuukle as they grow with our ever-expanding footprint of data centers in the Asian region and globally.

-Qasim

Based in Toronto, Qasim Virjee manages the Catalyst Startup Program in Canada and can be reached on twitter (@qasim) or via his personal website.

October 2, 2015

Under the Infrastructure: Growth account manager Matthew Miller is a problem solver

We’re creeping up on two months into the series, and Under the Infrastructure has introduced you to seven SLayers. We’re a pretty diverse and interesting bunch—if we do say so ourselves.

This week, we’re staying in amazing Amsterdam and chatting with growth account manager Matthew Miller. Fast approaching his six-year mark at SoftLayer, Miller is a born and bred Texan who moved to Amsterdam almost four years ago. He’s not a fan of the weather, but, well, this Dallas-based company wishes the whole world could be Texas.

SoftLayer: You’re a growth account manager. What does it mean to be a growth account manager?

Matthew Miller: We are responsible for worldwide growth account activities, which include revenue generation, long-term customer relationship management, retention, and business development with Internet-centric and tech-savvy companies. Our daily activities include vetting current Softlayer accounts and proactively engaging the accounts with the use of different communication methods to identify new sales opportunities and grow existing portfolios.

SL: You’re pretty much a relationship builder.

Miller: Correct.

SL: So what particular skills and talents, do you think, make a successful growth account manager?

Miller: Great communicator, problem solver, and trust. Most of the customers we deal with have so many problems, they don’t know where to start. You need to be able to communicate. But I don’t mean that as in just talking [laugh]. I’m talking about being able to explain things within the customer’s range. There are customers we deal with on a daily basis that have different levels of knowledge when it comes to technology and our business as a whole. So being able to understand your customers needs, while being able to explain it to them on their level, really helps build trust and confidence.

SL: So you kinda have to be, like, a technology whisperer. You have to understand what they’re looking for and interpret it.

Miller: To a degree, yes.

SL: What do you think is the coolest thing about your job?

Miller: Every day comes with its own little challenges. Not every day is the same; that’s the excitement of being in this position. You’re not going to have the same day yesterday as you do today. One day it could be super busy, the next day you’re selling, the next day you’re dealing with problems—there are always different day-to-day operations.

SL: Diversity in work responsibilities definitely makes life more interesting. Sort of on the flip side, what do you think is the most challenging thing about your job?

Miller: Customers [laughs]. We deal with customers all day, and that requires me to take the good with the bad. That’s the beauty of the job. One day you’ll be helping out a customer and they’re happy with our service, while you have another customer who’s struggling and is not happy. It’s part of the challenges we deal with daily.

SL: If you woke up and you had 2,000 unread emails and you could only answer 300 of them, how would you choose which ones to answer?

Miller: I’d start from the top and go down.

SL: You would? There wouldn’t be any sort of filtering in looking for specific names or companies or subject lines? You’d just start at the top?

Miller: Well, yeah, because if I can only do 300, it’s first come, first served.

SL: OK. In case anyone ever needs to get your attention and this 300 rule is implemented, they’d better email you a lot.

Miller: I hope I don’t wake up with 2,000 emails [laughs].

We think 2,000 of you should email Matthew right. this. second.

-Fayza

September 25, 2015

Under the Infrastructure: Fueled by chocolate, EMEA senior marketing manager Michalina Kiera lives on a diet of planning, monitoring, and executing regional tech strategies

Sure, we’re the cloud that’s built to perform. Yes, our network of networks is fast, resilient, and seamless around the globe. But our machines are nothing without human energy—because our teams are second to none. And you’d better believe that we’re going to brag, brag, and brag some more about the folks that comprise them in the latest edition of Under the Infrastructure.

This week, you’re meeting Michalina Kiera, another gem in our Amsterdam office. She’s been going strong with SoftLayer for over three-and-a-half years, and leads strategic marketing efforts in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.

SoftLayer: Describe your role at SoftLayer in 140 characters or less (the length of a tweet).

Michalina Kiera: Oh gosh, that’s why I’m not on Twitter—text length limitations make me twitch. I’m going to try, let’s see. I’m a transmitter and receiver in one, with cognitive thinking being part of the process. I stay tuned to what the EMEA technology market needs today and tomorrow, match it with what SoftLayer has to offer, and translate it into a compelling story with a goal to get people to the edge of their seats if they are not using SoftLayer yet.

SL: You’re a bit over the character limit, but that’s good enough for us. Tell us about a day in the life of a senior marketing manager in the EMEA region.

Kiera: If I’m not traveling or attending or speaking at some conference, then I’m at our Amsterdam office. I start in the morning with some tea (no coffee for me, thank you; I live on chocolate instead). Then I’m reading and writing tons of emails. Participating in tons of meetings online, on the phone, and face-to-face. All those are internal and external: with my colleagues, customers, partners, contractors, etc. Once a week, I’m going through reports on campaigns we’re running in the region, the number of servers humming in our European data centers, and the customers from the region that are deploying the servers around the world.

I’m busy coming up with new ideas to deliver on strategic goals, bouncing those off the team, and planning, monitoring, readjusting, and planning. In between, I always go through my daily pill of the news from the technology and marketing world—I rely on Google Alerts and religiously check LinkedIn Pulse, as it intelligently curates content for me from many sources that I used to check individually and adds the featured articles, blogs, and channels from people and organizations I either respect or need to stay tuned to.

Lunchtime is almost always in front of my screen, typing with one hand, eating with the other. It sounds sadder than it actually is—I enjoy the pace and the busy-ness! If the system overloads, I unwind watching a TED Talk.

It usually gets even busier in the afternoon, as the U.S. team comes to the office. And then my husband calls to tell me that it’s time to close the shop and come home—which I do with pleasure, as I love my little family to the extreme.

SL: How many black SoftLayer shirts do you own?

Kiera: Fourteen. Three cardigans. One dress. And one hoodie.

SL: What’s your best Server Challenge time?

Kiera: I’m more a fan of games in 11000001000101110010. With that in mind, I’ve brought in an idea that is currently in production; it should see the daylight soon, but shhhh—for now.

SL: What did you do for fun when you were 10 years old?

Kiera: I had volleyball training five hours a day (I was on a professional team), rollerblading (usually over the weekend, after the volleyball game). I hung around with my friends from the neighborhood. I sang along with Michael Jackson holding a hairbrush for a microphone. (Don’t judge me.)

I was hooked on Nintendo—the good ol’ cartridge-fed machines—playing Super Mario Bros., Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Adventure Island and Mortal Kombat. I also played PC games, from Phantasmagoria to MDK to Jack Jazz Rabbit—although I think when I was 10, it was the era of DOOM and Duke Nukem. My nerd-self expressed itself by going through math riddles for fun.

I have no idea how I found the time to do all of that. I prefer to think the days were simply longer.

Yes, all of our employees are just as ambitious and multitalented as Michalina. You’ll just have to stay tuned to the Under the Infrastructure series to keep up with them.

-Fayza

September 18, 2015

Under the Infrastructure: EMEA regional sales director Jonathan Wisler champions putting the customer first and the return of Disco Fridays

It’s time for the latest and greatest Under the Infrastructure! We’ll be honest: introducing you to our crew always gets us exclamation-point excited. (Sorry we’re not sorry.)

Up next is a chat with Jonathan Wisler, EMEA regional sales director in our (bursting at the seams) Amsterdam office. He’s originally from California, but he’s been in the Netherlands for about 10 years—and with SoftLayer for about four of those. He’s grown our Amsterdam location from an empty space to a bustling place.

But we’ll let him tell you the story himself.

SoftLayer: What was it like being SoftLayer’s first European employee?

Jonathan Wisler: After I interviewed, I went to Dallas for training, and it was all very exciting. I found out this was a great group of people doing fantastic things. Then I got back to Amsterdam and sat down in an empty office with an empty data center. I had mixed feelings: part of me was super excited—“OK, we’re part of a movement; I can get started!”—and the other part of me said, “What did I sign up for?” So it was both exciting and intimidating at the same time.

And now, the first [Amsterdam] data center is nearly full and we have a total of six data centers in Europe. The office is overflowing, so we’re expanding into the IBM offices, and we’re opening up some space in the coming days. It was a very exciting journey and it’s also very exciting to see the growth.

I have to admit: the first day I got back from Dallas and sat down in Amsterdam in an empty office, with an empty data center—it was a bit intimidating [laughs].

SL: How has SoftLayer changed or stayed the same since you started with the company?

Wisler: It’s certainly been an evolution. It’s evolved significantly, and you see the scaling in action. When I first started, we were the second international launch, only one month behind Singapore—so it went from a U.S.-based company to an international company virtually overnight.

Now, in Europe alone, we have five different locations, global teams, and we’ve integrated into IBM. The SoftLayer kernel is now scaling exponentially—not only inside SoftLayer as an organization, but we’re building and scaling inside IBM as well. It’s fantastic to see that it’s mushroomed and virtually exploded in terms of growth.

So naturally, what comes with that is that you see all different types of personalities and different types of cultures, all working together and getting the SoftLayer buzz, so to speak. They’re feeling the growth and developing the cloud movement.

SL: We’ve had monumental, volcanic change. Has anything stayed the same?

Wisler: The core definitely has. We were on a call last night to resolve some customer issues. We’re working across time zones, we’re working across regions, and we’re working across IBM and SoftLayer. But the fantastic thing is the glue that is our customer-first attitude. The first thing we said was, “OK, we need to solve the problem for the customer, we need to do it within hours, not days, and we’ll work out the internal things later.” That kind of core value has not changed, and I think that’s the key to our success. It’s awesome and it’s refreshing.

SL: What’s the best thing that you’ve learned over the course of your time at SoftLayer?

Wisler: Be flexible. If you look at where I started with Softlayer about four years ago—myself and an empty data center—at that time, we weren’t yet a part of IBM, one of the largest technology companies in the world. With where we were then and where we are today in terms of scale, focus, and what we need to do to close deals and fill up data centers, I’ve had to be flexible. Stay flexible, stay fast. And be adaptable, because you have different customer cultures and different internal cultures. SoftLayer has a very strong culture. So you need to be able to work across those.

SL: What’s the best prank you’ve ever pulled on a fellow SLayer?

Wisler: We started small and scaled fast, so pranks were luxurious. We’ve played some jokes on each other and we’ve had a lot of fun, but I don’t know if they’re pranks that would go in a blog [laughs].

SL: You don’t want your coworkers to anticipate your next move. We get that.

Wisler: Exactly. But it’s actually a good idea. When we first started in the SoftLayer office, we had Disco Fridays, which were always quite good. We’d have a sound system there, and the music would go on. As we got more crowded, that was harder to do. But we’re setting up some new office space in the IBM office, so I’m going to invest in a bigger sound system. And lights. Disco Fridays are back on again.

But now you’ve got me thinking about what kind of prank to pull.

SL: Why do tennis balls have fuzz?

Wisler: So when you smack them, they make a funny sound; that “oomph” sound. I don’t know. Is this a prank I should be expecting?

SL: [Laughing] It would be a little difficult to organize an international prank of…tennis balls.

Wisler: If I get a package in the post from you, I’m going to be a little leery.

SL: You should be.

If you’ll excuse me, I’ve got to make a quick trip to Academy for, uh, not tennis balls. Definitely not tennis balls.

-Fayza

July 7, 2015

All Aboard The SoftLayer Startup Train!

This year, SoftLayer partnered with ThreeFortyNine, a co-working space in Guelph, Ontario, to offer founders, funders, and anyone else heading to Montreal’s International Startup Festival an amazing first class ride on the SoftLayer Startup Train.

I sat down with Brydon Gilliss, the founder of ThreeFortyNine, to learn more about the experience.

Now in its fourth year, the Startup Train is quickly becoming an institution for entrepreneurs, funders, and professionals traveling from Toronto to the International Startup Festival. What was the impetus behind creating this experience?
The travel time to conferences is often wasted time. We wanted to try and make better use of it. Also, it can be lonely when you return from an exciting conference but don't have anyone to connect with after who had that shared experience with you. Having a group of people from your city who you travel and share the experience with creates a longer-term alumni effect in your community.

The International Startup Festival in Montreal draws one of the largest audiences of tech entrepreneurs out of any event in Canada. What do you think makes it so popular?
The city, for one. Montreal is one of the best cities to visit in the summer. There is always an attraction; a reason to make the time. The festival venue is completely different ... right on the water in Old Montreal. The festival-atmosphere makes it a unique and an enjoyable experience.

How has the Startup Train experience changed over the past 4 years?
Startup Train alumni know what to expect. There are always new people to meet and learn from, and we don’t complicate the experience with too much programming. There is enough to keep your business-busy if that’s your goal, but it’s also easy to relax, enjoy the service and views while meeting and chatting with people with a cocktail in hand. This year, VIA Rail, is doing us a favor and giving us one of their cool dome cars typically used for the longer-haul cross-Canada trips.

We’re really excited to do some speed mentorship on the observation deck of the train this year. What else can attendees expect to experience on the SoftLayer Startup Train this year?
There are plenty of people to discuss your ideas with. You can take advantage of the networking with like-minded startups, running your ideas past some of the old hats on the train, or getting some quality advice from the mentors on-board.

The train experience attracts people from around Ontario, not just Torontonians. What do you think gels the Ontario tech community, and how does this play out each year at the Festival in Montreal?
I'm not sure I know the answer. Certainly the train, as with other events in our community, is a gel point in itself. In Canada, in general, we're working to find our way quickly in this fast moving startup world. Events like the train and Startup Festival, are important ways for our lonely entrepreneurs to come together and build our energy; share battle stories; etc.

With around 2,000 people attending the International Startup Festival in Montreal it can get pretty hectic at the venue and in the Old Port in general. What are some tips you can give founders traveling, on or off the train, to Montreal for the Festival?
Getting to Montreal is half the battle. Those choosing Startup Train travel can expect to exert minimum effort with the payoff of maximum enjoyment. Train travel is so easy especially when compared to flying. To fly these days (we won’t even get into the 401 or driving in Montreal), travelers need to be hours early in order to be processed and searched. You have to deal with luggage hassles. You end up losing valuable time in an irritating environment. The actual flying experience itself isn’t an event compared to the romance and fun of train travel. From the moment you get to VIA Rail’s first class lounge prior to leisurely boarding, the actual experience itself is so relaxing. In a plane you’re not likely to get a view, but on a train, that’s all you have. It’s easy to meet and make authentic connections with people on the train right away, so that by the time you arrive in Montreal, you’ve already got some necessary work done. Near the Festival site, you’ve got plenty of social options in the city (walking distance and otherwise). It’s easy to sneak off and grab a beer on a cobblestone street in Old Montreal with startup train passengers if you need a break from the Festival.

For anyone interested in riding the SoftLayer Startup Train, please visit http://ibm.co/1HHV2QZ. If you are a member of our Catalyst Startup Program and would like to travel to the Festival on us, please email me ASAP.

-Qasim

July 1, 2015

Canada’s Funding Roadshow Recap

Fundica helps accelerate the online funding search for entrepreneurs in Canada. Once a year they take their mission offline and organize the country's only Funding Roadshow. In 2015, the SoftLayer Catalyst startup program partnered with Fundica to take the Roadshow to 11 cities across the country where they listened to over 200 entrepreneurs pitch their tech startups to panels of funders.

I recently sat down with Lana Tayara from the Funding Roadshow.

So, tell us about the purpose behind organizing the Funding Roadshow.
The mission of the event is to better facilitate connections between entrepreneurs, funders from private and public sectors, and startup community leaders across Canada. The event aims to fulfill its purpose though a series of events, planned in 11 cities across Canada, by providing educational content designed to help early-stage technology based companies either start and/or grow their business. The one-day event is split into two streams throughout the course of the day. The first one allows up to 20 selected tech companies to present their business in a private room to a panel of investors, mentors, and service providers and get candid feedback to help them validate their business model. The second stream is open to all participants, comprised of all company stages, community developers, investors, and services providers, to listen to great presentations provided by industry leaders that will cover a wide range of topics designed to help them succeed with their business.

To maximize engagement in each city, the Funding Roadshow collaborates with local pro-entrepreneurship groups (accelerators, incubators, universities). In turn, this allows us to better connect our national partners with the local entrepreneurial community and its facilitators. Our national partners get the opportunity to network with each community, gain visibility nationally in the startup scene, and raise awareness about the resources they can offer to Canadian businesses.

What were your 2015 Funding Roadshow goals?
The goals of the 2015 Funding Roadshow were to establish new partnerships with key players of the entrepreneurial community across Canada that would engage participants in each city to generate relevant connections, opportunities, and resources to each person present in the event.

In the 2015 Funding Roadshow, based on a follow-up survey conducted three months later, 31.6 percent of entrepreneurs were offered funding and 33.3 percent of funders funded entrepreneurs. With respect to the funding aspect of our event, our selection criteria for pitching companies were stricter, and presentation guidelines were shared with companies as to increase the quality of pitches and funding probability for 2015.

Lastly, we also offered a wider range of educational topics such as funding, growth models, legal guidance, bookkeeping, storytelling, and other resources available to help startups with their success. We would like to share the value with business owners using technology such as financial management software, online banking, cloud hosting, and secure cloud-based document storage, which can help increase efficiency and productivity within their organization.

What do you think the 2015 Funding Roadshow accomplished?
The 2015 Funding Roadshow travelled through 11 cities from Halifax to Victoria. In each city, up to 20 selected technology-based companies pitched to a panel of eight funders. The initiative was put together with 59 partners, and provided over 96 educational presentations, and engaged 1,147 participants coast-to-coast. The Funding Roadshow was very proud to be able to form new partnerships with two of the most influential hubs in Canada, MaRS and Ryerson DMZ, both of which welcomed the event into their space as exclusive hosting partners in downtown Toronto.

Based on on-site feedback forms we collected from participants across Canada, we received excellent responses:

  • 100 percent of participants who took the survey (funders, pitchers, community members, and general attendees) would participate in the next Funding Roadshow. (Based on a 19 percent participation response.)
  • 94 percent of all participants who answered the survey were satisfied to very satisfied.

We are already in talks with returning sponsors who have reached out to express interest in the next edition of the Funding Roadshow.

Please relate some highlights from across this year's Roadshow. Any themes which emerged amongst all the pitching and networking?

  1. Canadian VCs (venture capitalists) are investing more in early-stage companies.
  2. There is an increase in interest from U.S. investors in mid to later stage companies.
  3. Angel investment in technology companies has increased in comparison to previous years.
  4. Emerging accelerators and collaboration between them.
  5. Government funding varies significantly between provinces.
  6. Early stage companies are still struggling with funding identification.

Overall the Funding Roadshow was a great success, and we can’t wait for 2016. SoftLayer will be there. Will you?

-Qasim

June 19, 2015

Big Data Academy Rewind: Gaming and Mobile App Development Webinar

If you’ve been following along at home (and we hope you have been), you’re probably well-versed in SoftLayer and Cloudant’s free Big Data Academy, the (free) webinar and workshop series designed to teach you all about deploying big data workloads in the cloud, optimizing your infrastructure environment, and capitalizing on the value of your data. (Did we mention it’s free?)

And over the past two weeks, we’ve been recapping and rewinding our Big Data Academy webinar series right here on the blog. You’ve learned how to make the cloud work for those big data applications in the land of e-commerce in “Always Be Open for Business with Cloud Solutions for E-commerce.” Then you delved into the hybrid cloud with “Trusted Computing in a Hybrid Cloud Environment.”

In this, our final week of the Big Data Academy rewind, we’ll explore everyone’s favorite big data beast: gaming and mobile app development. Challenges and solutions? We’ve got them.

Watch the webinar below:

Did you enjoy these Big Data Academy webinars? Well, get offline and follow them to Europe! The Big Data Academy is trekking across the continent this summer, with free in-person workshops in Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Paris, and Helsinki throughout June and July. Register now and max out that summer vacation with a European workshop. (Bonus: All workshop participants will receive a special offer up to $1,250 per month for six months on SoftLayer.)

TOPICS INCLUDE:

  • [00:00:33.00]   Introduction of Howard Smith, SoftLayer Director of Sales Engineering
  • [00:01:02.00]   Overview of SoftLayer
  • [00:09:44.00]   Why SoftLayer?
  • [00:11:53.00]    Big Data (NOSQL) Challenges & SoftLayer Cloud Advantages
  • [00:14:55.00]   SoftLayer Cloud Advantages for Game Development
  • [00:16:36.00]   Big Data Solutions Optimized on SoftLayer
  • [00:18:08.00]   SoftLayer Customer Success Stories
  • [00:22:52.00]   Why Choose Cloudant on SoftLayer?
  • [00:26:25.00]   Introduction of Glynn Bird, IBM Cloudant Developer Advocate
  • [00:27:11.00]    The State of the Digital World, Data Delivery & Choosing a Database
  • [00:32:33.00]   Introduction to IBM Cloudant
  • [00:36:40.00]   Why Gaming and Mobile App Devs Use Cloudant
  • [00:43:14.00]    Cloudant is for Gaming
  • [00:46:36.00]   Cloudant & Mobile App Development
  • [00:49:08.00]   Questions & Conclusion

-Fayza

June 12, 2015

Big Data Academy Rewind: Trusted Computing in a Hybrid Cloud Environment

Through the ongoing (and free!) Big Data Academy, SoftLayer and Cloudant have teamed up to help you learn more about deploying big data workloads in the cloud, optimizing your infrastructure environment, and capitalizing on the value of your data via a series of free webinars and workshops.

But we know some of you prefer learning at your leisure, so we’re recapping our Big Data Academy webinars just for you. Last week, we brought you the first of our Big Data Academy webinar rewind series, “Always Be Open for Business with Cloud Solutions for E-commerce.” This week, we’ll be talking hybrid cloud: security, building and establishing trust and compliance, and enabling a hybrid computing environment.

Watch the webinar below:

Stay tuned for the next Big Data Academy webinar rewind, where we'll tackle the challenges and present the solutions to gaming and mobile app development.

By the way, are you in Europe this summer? The Big Data Academy is backpacking across the continent, with free in-person workshops in Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Paris, and Helsinki throughout June and July. Register now and top off your summer vacation with a free European workshop. (Bonus: All workshop participants will receive a special offer up to $1,250 per month for six months on SoftLayer.)

TOPICS INCLUDE:

  • [00:00:04.00]   Introduction of Karunakar Bojjireddy, SoftLayer Security Product Manager
  • [00:00:45.00]   Overview of SoftLayer
  • [00:02:55.00]   The SoftLayer definition of "cloud"
  • [00:05:52.00]   The SoftLayer difference
  • [00:06:58.00]   Hybrid cloud and security
  • [00:10:32.00]    Building trust and compliance in the cloud
  • [00:11:51.00]     Intel TXT technology on SoftLayer
  • [00:13:27.00]    Establishing trust using Intel TXT/TPM
  • [00:17:55.00]    Platforms using TXT/TPM and enabling the hybrid environment
  • [00:22:33.00]   How trusted computing pools work in an OpenStack environment
  • [00:25:39.00]   Example: the United States government
  • [00:28:35.00]   Questions and conclusion

-Fayza

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