Sales Posts

September 30, 2014

SELLING SOFTLAYER (in Amsterdam)

Selling SoftLayer services to Internet-centric companies—hosting resellers, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) providers, big data and e-commerce companies—are no-brainers. These companies clearly see the advantages that come with having their servers (the backbone of their business) hosted by a specialist. They switch their capital expenses into variable costs that can be spread over time.

On the flip side are companies in non-Internet-centric industries—banking, health care, oil & gas, and aerospace. How do these companies find value in the IaaS offered by SoftLayer? The IT infrastructure (servers to be precise) accounts for less than 5 percent of their capital expenditure (CAPEX) as opposed to almost 95 percent for Internet-centric companies.

Will the same value proposition work for both Internet-centric and non-Internet-centric companies?

With Internet-centric companies (where servers constitute up to 95 percent of CAPEX), the majority of the workforce is server-savvy. This means there is a very high chance any contact we have with these companies will be with a server-savvy fellow. Selling SoftLayer will then be a question of how SoftLayer’s USPs differentiate from the competition.

The current industry trend is driving a faulty message: The cloud is a commodity.

The truth is: Unlike basic commodities (electricity, gas, or cable), where there is little or no differentiation between what the end user gets irrespective of the provider, cloud and hosting in general are different. This faulty commodity-based assumption drives the price wars in cloud computing.

Comparing apples and oranges cumulus and stratus.

To test and disprove this theory, I brought a customer’s systems engineer (a server expert) into a sales discussion with the CTO.

I requested to put the price negotiations on hold for about 4 hours, and evaluate the services first. To do this, I asked for the exact configuration that the customer had hosted with a competitor. I ordered the exact configuration on the SoftLayer platform and within 2 hours the servers were ready. When the customer’s system engineer tested the performance of the SoftLayer server and compared it to what they had from a competitor, the price comparison was thrown out the window for good.

There are many different facets wherein SoftLayer outperforms the competition but unfortunately, most prospective customers only see price.

For the non-Internet-centric companies, to reach the price discussion is a milestone in itself. Pricing negotiations only begin when the need and suitability (originality) have been established.

The IBM and SoftLayer effect.

As a salesperson, I subscribe to the SCOTSMAN Sales Qualification Matrix (Solution, Competition, Originality, Timescales, Size, Money, Authority, and Need). Most companies in this group need solutions. IaaS is just part of that solution. This is where IBM (Big Blue) comes into the picture. As a service giant in the IT Sector, IBM can and will build on SoftLayer’s IaaS prowess to conquer this landscape. The synergies that are coming from this acquisition will send shockwaves across the industry.

Question is: Will the stakeholders maximize this potential to the fullest?

- Valentine Che, Global Sales, AMS01

July 16, 2014

Vyatta Gateway Appliance vs Vyatta Network OS

I hear this question almost daily: “What’s the difference between the Vyatta Network OS offered by SoftLayer and the SoftLayer Vyatta Gateway Appliance?” The honest answer is, from a software perspective, nothing. However from a deployment perspective, there are a couple fundamental differences.

Vyatta Network OS on the SoftLayer Platform

SoftLayer offers customers the ability to spin up different bare metal or virtual server configurations, and choose either the community or subscription edition of the Vyatta Network operating system. The server is deployed like any other host on the SoftLayer platform with a public and private interface placed in the VLANs selected while ordering. Once online, you can route traffic through the Vyatta Network server by changing the default gateway on your hosts to use the Vyatta Network server IP rather than the default gateway. You have the option to configure ingress and egress ACLs for your bare metal or virtual servers that route through the Vyatta Network server. The Vyatta Network server can also be configured as a VPN end point to terminate Internet Protocol Security (IPSEC), Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE), or OpenSSL VPN connections, and securely connect to the SoftLayer Private Network. Sounds great right?

So, how is a Vyatta Network OS server different from a SoftLayer Vyatta Gateway Appliance?

A True Gateway

While it’s true that the Vyatta Gateway Appliance has the same functionality as a server running the Vyatta Network operating system, one of the primary differences is that the Vyatta Gateway Appliance is delivered as a true gateway. You may be asking yourself what that means. It means that the Vyatta Gateway Appliance is the only entry and exit point for traffic on VLANs you associate with it. When you place an order for the Vyatta Gateway Appliance and select your public and private VLANs, the Vyatta Gateway Appliance comes online with its native VLAN for its public and private interfaces in a transit VLAN. The VLANs you selected are trunked to the gateway appliance’s public and private interfaces via an 802.1q trunk setup on the server’s interface switch ports. These VLANs will show up in the customer portal as associated VLANs for the Vyatta Gateway Appliance.

This configuration allows SoftLayer to create an outside, unprotected interface (in the transit VLAN) and an inside, protected interface (on your bare metal server or virtual server VLAN). As part of the configuration, we set up SoftLayer routers to static route all IP space that belongs to the associated VLANs to the Vyatta Gateway Appliance transit VLAN IP address. The servers you have in a VLAN associated with gateway appliance can no longer use the SoftLayer default gateway to route in and out of the VLAN. All traffic must be filtered through the Gateway Appliance, making it a true gateway.

This differs from a server deployed with the Vyatta Network OS because hosts behind the Vyatta Network OS server can route around it by simply changing their default gateway back to the SoftLayer default gateway.

N-Tier Architecture

Another difference is that the gateway appliance gives customers the option to route multiple public and private VLANs in the same pod (delineated by an FCR/BCR pair) through the device. This allows you to use the gateway appliance to create granular segmentation between different VLANs within your environment, and set up a traditional tiered infrastructure environment with ingress and egress rules between the tiers.

A server running Vyatta Network OS cannot be configured this way. The Vyatta Network OS server is placed in a single public and private VLAN, and there is no option to associate different VLANs with the server.

I hope this helps clear up the confusion around Vyatta on the SoftLayer platform. As always, if you have any questions or concerns about any of SoftLayer’s products or services, the sales and sales engineering teams are happy to help.

-Kelly

October 14, 2013

Product Spotlight: Vyatta Network Gateway Appliance

In the wake of our recent Vyatta network gateway appliance product launch, I thought I'd address some of the most common questions customers have asked me about the new offering. With inquiries spanning the spectrum from broad and general to detailed and specific, I might not be able to cover everything in this blog post, but at the very least, it should give a little more context for our new network gateway offering.

To begin, let's explore the simplest question I've been asked: "What is a network gateway?" A network gateway provides tools to manage traffic into and out of one or more VLANs (Virtual Local Area Networks). The network gateway serves a customer-configurable routing device that sits in front of designated VLANs. The servers in those VLANs route through the network gateway appliance as their first hop instead of Front-end Customer Routers (FCR) or Back-end Customer Routers (BCR). From an infrastructure perspective, SoftLayer's network gateway offering consists of a single server, and in the future, the offering will be expanded to multi-server configurations to support high availability needs and larger clustered configurations.

The general function of a network gateway may seem a little abstract, so let's look at a couple real world use cases to see how you can put that functionality to work in your own cloud environment.

Example 1: Complex Traffic Management
You have a multi-server cloud environment and a complex set of firewall rules that allow certain types of traffic to certain servers from specific addresses. Without a network gateway, you would need to configure multiple hardware and software firewalls throughout your topology and maintain multiple rules sets, but with the network gateway appliance, you streamline your configuration into a single point of control on both the public and private networks.

After you order a gateway appliance in the SoftLayer portal and configure which VLANs route through the appliance, the process of configuring the device is simple: You define your production, development and QA environments with distinct traffic rules, and the network gateway handles the traffic segmentation. If you wanted to create your own VPN to connect your hosted environment to your office or in-house data center, that configuration is quick and easy as well. The high-touch challenge of managing several sets of network rules across multiple devices is simplified and streamlined.

Example 2: Creating a Static NAT
You want to create a static NAT (Network Address Translation) so that you can direct traffic through a public IP address to an internal IP address. With the IPv4 address pool dwindling and new allocations being harder to come by, this configuration is becoming extremely popular to accommodate users who can't yet reach IPv6 addresses. This challenge would normally require a significant level of effort of even the most seasoned systems administrator, but with the gateway appliance, it's a painless process.

In addition to the IPv4 address-saving benefits, your static NAT adds a layer of protection for your internal web servers from the public network, and as we discussed in the first example, your gateway device also serves as a single configuration point for both inbound and outbound firewall rules.

If you have complex network-related needs, and you want granular control of the traffic to and from your servers, a gateway appliance might be the perfect tool for you. You get the control you want and save yourself a significant amount of time and effort configuring and tweaking your environment on-the-fly. You can terminate IPSec VPN tunnels, execute your own network address translation, and run diagnostic commands such as traffic monitoring (tcpdump) on your global environment. And in addition to that, your gateway serves as a single point of contact to configure sophisticated firewall rules!

If you want to learn more about the gateway appliance, check out KnowledgeLayer or contact our friendly sales team directly with your questions: sales@softlayer.com

-Ben

September 30, 2013

The Economics of Cloud Computing: If It Seems Too Good to Be True, It Probably Is

One of the hosts of a popular Sirius XM radio talk show was recently in the market to lease a car, and a few weeks ago, he shared an interesting story. In his research, he came across an offer he came across that seemed "too good to be true": Lease a new Nissan Sentra with no money due at signing on a 24-month lease for $59 per month. The car would as "base" as a base model could be, but a reliable car that can be driven safely from Point A to Point B doesn't need fancy "upgrades" like power windows or an automatic transmission. Is it possible to lease new car for zero down and $59 per month? What's the catch?

After sifting through all of the paperwork, the host admitted the offer was technically legitimate: He could lease a new Nissan Sentra for $0 down and $59 per month for two years. Unfortunately, he also found that "lease" is just about the extent of what he could do with it for $59 per month. The fine print revealed that the yearly mileage allowance was 0 (zero) — he'd pay a significant per-mile rate for every mile he drove the car.

Let's say the mileage on the Sentra was charged at $0.15 per mile and that the car would be driven a very-conservative 5,000 miles per year. At the end of the two-year lease, the 10,000 miles on the car would amount to a $1,500 mileage charge. Breaking that cost out across the 24 months of the lease, the effective monthly payment would be around $121, twice the $59/mo advertised lease price. Even for a car that would be used sparingly, the numbers didn't add up, so the host wound up leasing a nicer car (that included a non-zero mileage allowance) for the same monthly cost.

The "zero-down, $59/mo" Sentra lease would be a fantastic deal for a person who wants the peace of mind of having a car available for emergency situations only, but for drivers who put the national average of 15,000 miles per year, the economic benefit of such a low lease rate is completely nullified by the mileage cost. If you were in the market to lease a new car, would you choose that Sentra deal?

At this point, you might be wondering why this story found its way onto the SoftLayer Blog, and if that's the case, you don't see the connection: Most cloud computing providers sell cloud servers like that car lease.

The "on demand" and "pay for what you use" aspects of cloud computing make it easy for providers to offer cloud servers exclusively as short-term utilities: "Use this cloud server for a couple of days (or hours) and return it to us. We'll just charge you for what you use." From a buyer's perspective, this approach is easy to justify because it limits the possibility of excess capacity — paying for something you're not using. While that structure is effective (and inexpensive) for customers who sporadically spin up virtual server instances and turn them down quickly, for the average customer looking to host a website or application that won't be turned off in a given month, it's a different story.

Instead of discussing the costs in theoretical terms, let's look at a real world example: One of our competitors offers an entry-level Linux cloud server for just over $15 per month (based on a 730-hour month). When you compare that offer to SoftLayer's least expensive monthly virtual server instance (@ $50/mo), you might think, "OMG! SoftLayer is more than three times as expensive!"

But then you remember that you actually want to use your server.

You see, like the "zero down, $59/mo" car lease that doesn't include any mileage, the $15/mo cloud server doesn't include any bandwidth. As soon as you "drive your server off the lot" and start using it, that "fantastic" rate starts becoming less and less fantastic. In this case, outbound bandwidth for this competitor's cloud server starts at $0.12/GB and is applied to the server's first outbound gigabyte (and every subsequent gigabyte in that month). If your server sends 300GB of data outbound every month, you pay $36 in bandwidth charges (for a combined monthly total of $51). If your server uses 1TB of outbound bandwidth in a given month, you end up paying $135 for that "$15/mo" server.

Cloud servers at SoftLayer are designed to be "driven." Every monthly virtual server instance from SoftLayer includes 1TB of outbound bandwidth at no additional cost, so if your cloud server sends 1TB of outbound bandwidth, your total charge for the month is $50. The "$15/mo v. $50/mo" comparison becomes "$135/mo v. $50/mo" when we realize that these cloud servers don't just sit in the garage. This illustration shows how the costs compare between the two offerings with monthly bandwidth usage up to 1.3TB*:

Cloud Cost v Bandwidth

*The graphic extends to 1.3TB to show how SoftLayer's $0.10/GB charge for bandwidth over the initial 1TB allotment compares with the competitor's $0.12/GB charge.

Most cloud hosting providers sell these "zero down, $59/mo car leases" and encourage you to window-shop for the lowest monthly price based on number of cores, RAM and disk space. You find the lowest price and mentally justify the cost-per-GB bandwidth charge you receive at the end of the month because you know that you're getting value from the traffic that used that bandwidth. But you'd be better off getting a more powerful server that includes a bandwidth allotment.

As a buyer, it's important that you make your buying decisions based on your specific use case. Are you going to spin up and spin down instances throughout the month or are you looking for a cloud server that is going to stay online the entire month? From there, you should estimate your bandwidth usage to get an idea of the actual monthly cost you can expect for a given cloud server. If you don't expect to use 300GB of outbound bandwidth in a given month, your usage might be best suited for that competitor's offering. But then again, it's probably worth mentioning that that SoftLayer's base virtual server instance has twice the RAM, more disk space and higher-throughput network connections than the competitor's offering we compared against. Oh yeah, and all those other cloud differentiators.

-@khazard

February 27, 2013

The Three Most Common Hosting-Related Phobias

As a member of the illustrious the SoftLayer sales (SLales) team, I have the daily pleasure of talking with any number of potential, prospective, new and current customers, and in many of those conversations, I've picked up on a fairly common theme: FEAR. Now we're not talking about lachanophobia (fear of vegetables) or nomophobia (fear of losing cell phone contact) here ... We're talking about fear that paralyzes users and holds them captive — effectively preventing their growth and limiting their business's potential. Fear is a disease.

I've created my own little naming convention for the top three most common phobias I hear from users as they consider making changes to their hosting environments:

1. Pessimisobia
This phobia is best summarized by the saying, "Better the devil you know than the devil you don't." Users with this phobia could suffer from frequent downtime, a lack of responsive support and long term commitment contracts, but their service is a known quantity. What if a different provider is even worse? If you don't suffer from pessimisobia, this phobia probably seems silly, but it's very evident in many of the conversations I have.

2. Whizkiditus
This affliction is particularly prevalent in established companies. Symptoms of this phobia include recurring discomfort associated with the thought of learning a new management system or deviating from a platform where users have become experts. There's an efficiency to being comfortable with how a particular platform works, but the ceiling to that efficiency is the platform itself. Users with whizkiditus might not admit it, but the biggest reason they shy away from change is that they are afraid of losing the familiarity they've built with their old systems over the years ... even if that means staying on a platform that prohibits scale and growth.

3. Everythingluenza
In order to illustrate this phobia of compartmentalizing projects to phase in changes, let's look at a little scenario:

I host all of my applications at Company 1. I want to move Application A to the more-qualified Company 2, but if I do that, I'll have to move Applications B through Z to Company 2 also. All of that work would be too time-consuming and cumbersome, so I won't change anything.

It's easy to get overwhelmed when considering a change of cloud hosting for any piece of your business, and it's even more intimidating when you feel like it has to be an "all or nothing" decision.

Unless you are afflicted with euphobia (the fear of hearing good news), you'll be happy to hear that these common fears, once properly diagnosed, are quickly and easily curable on the SoftLayer platform. There are no known side effects from treatment, and patients experience immediate symptom relief with a full recovery in between 1-3 months.

This might be a lighthearted look at some quirky fears, but I don't want to downplay how significant these phobias are to the developers and entrepreneurs that suffer from them. If any of these fears strike a chord with you, reach out to the SLales team (by phone, chat or email), and we'll help you create a treatment plan. Once you address and conquer these fears, you can devote all of your energy back to getting over your selenophobia (fear of the moon).

-Arielle

Categories: 
July 27, 2012

SoftLayer 'Cribs' ≡ DAL05 Data Center Tour

The highlight of any customer visit to a SoftLayer office is always the data center tour. The infrastructure in our data centers is the hardware platform on which many of our customers build and run their entire businesses, so it's not surprising that they'd want a first-hand look at what's happening inside the DC. Without exception, visitors to a SoftLayer data center pod are impressed when they walk out of a SoftLayer data center pod ... even if they've been in dozens of similar facilities in the past.

What about the customers who aren't able to visit us, though? We can post pictures, share stats, describe our architecture and show you diagrams of our facilities, but those mediums can't replace the experience of an actual data center tour. In the interest of bridging the "data center tour" gap for customers who might not be able to visit SoftLayer in person (or who want to show off their infrastructure), we decided to record a video data center tour.

If you've seen "professional" video data center tours in the past, you're probably positioning a pillow on top of your keyboard right now to protect your face if you fall asleep from boredom when you hear another baritone narrator voiceover and see CAD mock-ups of another "enterprise class" facility. Don't worry ... That's not how we roll:

Josh Daley — whose role as site manager of DAL05 made him the ideal tour guide — did a fantastic job, and I'm looking forward to feedback from our customers about whether this data center tour style is helpful and/or entertaining.

If you want to see more videos like this one, "Like" it, leave comments with ideas and questions, and share it wherever you share things (Facebook, Twitter, your refrigerator, etc.).

-@khazard

June 21, 2012

New Swag, New Booth, New Product Announcement: SoftLayer at Cloud Expo East 2012

When a SLayers pack their bags and heads to the 'Big Apple,' we go BIG. Our most recent trip to NYC for Cloud Expo East proved that statement over and over again. When I heard I'd be one of the employees representing SoftLayer at the Javits Convention Center, I did a little dance ... Cloud Expo is one of my favorite conferences, and New York City is one of my favorite cities, so I had a lot to be excited about.

Cloud Expo East and Cloud Expo West are two of the biggest shows SoftLayer sponsors every year. Attendees come from various industries — from digital marketing agencies to software as a service providers to hosting resellers — with their own needs and questions about what's happening "in the cloud." Because our Cloud Expo presences usually get a ton of traffic, we decided to unveil our brand new 20' by 20' booth in New York:

SoftLayer at Cloud Expo East

For the last few months, we've been sketching, editing and tweaking our vision of the booth. Naturally, our new "Build the Future" branding was present, and you could see the simple "Our Platform. Your Vision." statement from wherever you were. By the time the design was finalized, we were on pins and needles in anticipation, waiting for the booth leap off the paper. We weren't disappointed, and conference attendees weren't either.

In addition to the hundreds of conversations we had with attendees about SoftLayer's cloud computing capabilities, it was pretty amazing to me that so many people commented on our booth design. Many attendees noticed that our booth gets bigger and bigger every year, and the fact that our booth towered over most of the other booths in the area made that a pretty easy observation. As attendees were moving down the escalators into the exhibition hall, they were greeted by the SoftLayer. Because the booth was designed with an open-concept in mind, we never felt too claustrophobic ... Even when a flood of people would come hunting for the new SoftLayer flexi-frisbees we were giving out after they heard Duke or Marc present.

SoftLayer at Cloud Expo East

Despite the "openness" of the booth design, many attendees were able to gather what SoftLayer is all about from the graphic side panels ... and the Server Challenge:

SoftLayer at Cloud Expo East

That's right. The infamous Server Challenge continued to draw crowds and spark conversations in the new booth. And it was the perfect "finishing touch" to put the new conference presence over the top. While some attendees were hesitant to step up to try their hands at the competition, others were eager to accept the challenge. And as usual, the leader board was impossibly close:

  1. Dejian Fang - 0:59.08
  2. Corjan Bast - 0:59.59
  3. Logan Best - 1:00.49
  4. Jeffrey Abatayo - 1:01.00
  5. Bryan Wong - 1:01.84

The top time of 59.08 seconds was a mere 2.76 seconds faster than the fifth place time!

When conference attendees weren't watching the Server Challenge craziness or ducking to avoid an errant SoftLayer frisbee, we had a few more "oohs" and "ahhs" to share. In the new booth design, we incorporated four iMacs, one in each corner. If an attendee had a question about our portal, our pricing or our API, we could fire up a browser and use the SoftLayer-sponsored conference wifi to take them where they needed to go. If no one was using the computers, the screens would show a flashy video that included some interesting SoftLayer facts and a look at a SoftLayer Truck Day.

SoftLayer at Cloud Expo East

Off the expo floor, SoftLayer CTO Duke Skarda and Vice President of Product Innovation Marc Jones announced our new product, Private Clouds. No big deal. If you didn't see that announcement or you want to learn more, Nathan Day (SoftLayer's Chief Scientist) posted a fantastic blog coinciding with SoftLayer's private clouds release, and Duke followed up with an in depth look at how and why we chose to build private clouds the way we did.

Sad that you missed your chance to see the new 20' x 20' booth in person? Don't cry... If you're in the Silicon Valley for Cloud Expo West (November 5-8), we won't be hard to spot.

-Natalie

Categories: 
April 4, 2012

Sharing a Heavy Load - New Load Balancer Options

I always think of Ford, Chevy and Toyota pick-up truck commercials when I think of load balancers. The selling points for trucks invariably boil down to performance, towing capacity and torque, and I've noticed that users evaluating IT network load balancers have a similar simplified focus.

The focus is always about high performance, scalability, failover protection and network optimization. When it comes to "performance," users are looking for reliable load balancing techniques — whether it be round robin, least connections, shortest response or persistent IP. Take one of the truck commericals and replace "towing capacity" with "connections per second" and "torque" with "application acceleration" or "SSL offloading," and you've got yourself one heck of a load balancer sales pitch.

SoftLayer's goal has always been to offer a variety of local and global load balancing options, and today, I get to announce that we're broadening that portfolio.

So what's new?

We've added the capability of SSL offloading to our shared load balancers and launched a dedicated load balancer option as well. These new additions to the product portfolio continue our efforts to make life easier on our customers as they build their own fully operational virtual data center.

What's so great about SSL offloading? It accelerates the processing of SSL encrypted websites and makes it easier to manage SSL certificates. Think of this as adding more torque to your environment, speeding up how quickly certs can be decrypted (coming in) and encrypted (heading out).

Up until now, SoftLayer has offered SSL at the server level. This requires multiple SSL certifications for each server or special certs that can be used on multiple servers. With SSL offloading, incoming traffic is decrypted at the load balancer, rather than at the server level, and the load balancer also encrypts outbound traffic. This means traffic is processed in one place — at the load balancer — rather than at multiple server locations sitting behind the load balancer.

With SoftLayer SSL offloading on shared load balancers, customers can start small with few connections and grow on the fly by adding more connections or moving to a dedicated load balancer. This makes it a breeze to deploy, manage, upgrade and scale.

What do the new load balance offerings look like in the product catalog? Here's a breakdown:

Shared Load Balancing
250 Connections with SSL $99.99
500 Connections with SSL $199.99
1000 Connections with SSL $399.99
Dedicated Load Balancer
Standard with SSL $999.00

I'm not sure if load balancing conjures up the same images for you of hauling freight or working on a construction site, but however you think about them, load balancers play an integral part in optimizing IT workloads and network performance ... They're doing the heavy lifting to help get the job done. If you're looking for a dedicated or shared load balancer solution, you know who to call.

-Matt

March 26, 2012

Planning Your Server Infrastructure = Buying a House

With a little one on the way, I've been spending a good amount of my free time starting to search for a new home for my growing family. While the search continues, I've learned a thing or two about what to look for and what should be done before taking the plunge, and as I've gone through the process, I can't help but notice lot of parallels to what it's like to purchase a new server:

  • It's an Investment

    Just like purchasing a new home, deciding to purchase a server is a huge investment. As you start shopping around, the costs may seem staggering, and while most servers don't cost as much as a small home, your new server will be your business's new home online. When you consider the revenue your site will generate (and the potential cost of not being able to properly support demand), you won't want to skimp on the details. The truth is that like any investment, you can reap great rewards with proper planning and execution.

  • You Have to Know What You Need

    One of the best tips I've incorporated in my home-buying process is the need to differentiate what you want, what you need, and what you can live without. Unless you're royalty, you're likely living on a budget. As cool as it would be to live in a 10-bedroom mansion with an indoor Olympic size pool, there's a lot there that I don't need. That sort of home palace also falls way outside of my personal budget. The same could be said about a business.

    I've heard plenty of stories about companies who slash their IT budgets in order to cut costs, and even the greatest IT departments have to live within their budgets. As you're determining what your next server will be, you need to understand the purpose (and needs) of your workload: Will it be database server? An application server? Will it be an additional web head? Are you using it for mass storage? You need to plan accordingly. I'm sure you'd want a new Xeon E5-2600 server with all of the bells and whistles, but if you don't need that kind of performance, you're likely just going to burn through your budget quicker than you have to. Know your budget, know your needs and purchase your server accordingly.

  • You Should Get to Know the Neighborhood

    I don't intend on purchasing a home in a high-crime area, nor do I plan on moving into a neighborhood with exorbitant HOA dues for services I don't intend to use. Your new server is going to have a "neighborhood" as well when it comes to the network it's connected to, so if you plan on outsourcing your IT infrastructure, you should do the same research.

    You want your critical environments in a safe place, and the easiest way to get them in the right "neighborhood" is to work with a well-established host who's able to accommodate what you're doing. A $20/mo shared hosting account is great for a personal blog site, but it probably wouldn't be a good fit for a busy database server or front-end application servers for an application dependent on advertising for revenue. A mansion worth of furniture doesn't fit very well in a studio apartment.

  • You're Responsible for Maintenance

    Ask any homeowner: Continuous improvements — as well as routine maintenance &mdashl are a requirement. Failure to take care of your property can result in fines and much more costly repairs down the road. Likewise with any server, you have to do your maintenance. Keep your software up to date, practice good security protocols, and continue to monitor for problems. If you don't, you could find yourself at the mercy of malicious activity or worse — catastrophic failure. Which leads me to ...

  • You Need Insurance Against Disaster

    Homeowner's insurance protects you from disaster, and it provides indemnity in the event someone is hurt on your property. Sometimes additional insurance may be required. Many professionals recommend flood insurance to protect from flood damage not covered under a typical homeowner's insurance policy. Ask any systems administrator, and they'll tell you all about server insurance: BACKUPS. ALWAYS BACK UP YOUR DATA!!! The wrong time to figure out that your backups weren't properly maintained is when you need them, more specifically in the event of a hardware failure. It's a fact of life: Hardware can fail. Murphy's Law would suggest it will fail at the worst possible time. Maintain your backups!

I can't claim that this is the guide to buying a server, but seeing the parallels with buying a new home might be a catalyst for you to look at the server-buying process in a different light. You should consider your infrastructure an asset before you simply consider it a cost.

-Matthew

February 13, 2012

Logic Challenge: SoftLayer Server Rack Riddle

After I spent a little time weaving together a story in response to SKinman's "Choose Your Own Adventure" puzzle (which you can read in the comments section), I was reminded of another famous logic puzzle that I came across a few years ago. Because it was begging to be SoftLayer-ized, I freshened it up to challenge our community.

In 1962, Life International magazine published a logic puzzle that was said to be so difficult that it could only be solved by two percent of the world's population. It's been attributed to Einstein, and apparently Lewis Carroll is given a claim to it as well, but regardless of the original author, it's a great brain workout.

If you haven't tried a puzzle like this before, don't get discouraged and go Googling for the answer. You're given every detail you need to answer the question at the end ... Take your time and think about how the components are interrelated. If you've solved this puzzle before, this iteration might only be light mental calisthenics, but with its new SoftLayer twist, it should still be fun:

Einstein's SoftLayer Riddle

The Scenario: You're in a SoftLayer data center. You walk up to a server rack and you see five servers in the top five slots on the rack. Each of the five servers has a distinct hard drive configuration, processor type, operating system, control panel (or absence thereof) and add-on storage. No two servers in this rack are the same in any of those aspects.

  • The CentOS6 operating system is being run on the Xeon 3230 server.
  • The Dual Xeon 5410 server is racked next to (immediately above or below) the server running the Red Hat 6 operating system.
  • The Dual Xeon 5610 server uses 50GB of CloudLayer Storage as its add-on storage.
  • The Quad Xeon 7550 server has no control panel.
  • The Cent OS 5 operating system is racked immediately below the server running the Red Hat 5 operating system.
  • The server using 80GB NAS add-on storage is racked next to (immediately above or below) the server with two 100GB SSD hard drives.
  • The server running the Red Hat 5 operating system uses Parallels Virtuozzo (3VPS) as a control panel.
  • The server running the Windows 2008 operating system has two 100GB SSD hard drives.
  • The server using Plesk 9 as a control panel is in the middle space in the five-server set in the rack.
  • The top server in the rack is the Dual Xeon 5410 server.
  • The Xeon 3450 server has two 147GB 10K RPM SA-SCSI hard drives.
  • The server using 20GB EVault as its add-on storage has one 250GB SATA II hard drive.
  • The server with four 600GB 15K RPM SA-SCSI hard drives is next to (immediately above or below) the server using 100GB iSCSI SAN add-on storage.
  • The server using cPanel as a control panel has two 2TB SATA II hard drives.
  • The server with four 600GB 15K RPM SA-SCSI hard drives is racked next to (immediately above or below) the server using Plesk 10 (Unlimited) as a control panel.
  • One server will use a brand new, soon-to-be-announced product offering as its add-on storage.

Question: What is the monthly cost of the server that will be using our super-secret new product offering for its add-on storage?

Use the SoftLayer Shopping Cart to come up with your answer. You can assume that the server has a base configuration (unless specifically noted in the clues above), that SoftLayer's promotions are not used, and that the least expensive version of the control panel is being used for any control panel with several price points. You won't be able to include the cost of the add-on storage (yet), so just provide the base configuration cost of that server in one of our US-based data centers with all of the specs you are given.

Bonus Question: If you ordered all five of those servers, how long would it take for them to be provisioned for you?

Submit your answers via comment, and we'll publish the comments in about a week so other people have a chance to answer it without the risk of scrolling down and seeing spoilers.

-@khazard

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