Softlayer Posts

October 1, 2014

Virtual Server Update

Good morning, afternoon, evening, or night, SoftLayer nation.

We want to give you an update and some more information on maintenance taking place right now with SoftLayer public and private node virtual servers.

As the world is becoming aware today, over the past week a security risk associated with Xen was identified by the Xen community and published as Xen Security Advisory 108 (XSA-108).

And as many are aware, Xen plays a role in our delivery of SoftLayer virtual servers.

Eliminating the vulnerability requires updating software on host nodes, and that requires downtime for the virtual servers running on those nodes.

Yeah, that’s not something anyone likes to hear. But customer security is of the utmost importance to us, so not doing it was not an option.

As soon as the risk was identified, our systems engineers and technology partners have been working nonstop to prepare the update.

On Sunday we notified every customer account that would be affected that we would have emergency maintenance in the middle of this week, and updated that notice each day.

And then yesterday we published that the maintenance would begin today at 3pm UTC, with a preliminary order of how the maintenance would roll out across all of our data centers.

We are updating host nodes data center by data center to complete the emergency maintenance as quickly as possible. This approach will minimize disruption for customers with failover infrastructure in multiple data centers.

The maintenance is under way and SoftLayer customers can follow it, live, on our forum at http://sftlyr.com/xs101.

-@SoftLayer

September 30, 2014

SELLING SOFTLAYER (in Amsterdam)

Selling SoftLayer services to Internet-centric companies—hosting resellers, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) providers, big data and e-commerce companies—are no-brainers. These companies clearly see the advantages that come with having their servers (the backbone of their business) hosted by a specialist. They switch their capital expenses into variable costs that can be spread over time.

On the flip side are companies in non-Internet-centric industries—banking, health care, oil & gas, and aerospace. How do these companies find value in the IaaS offered by SoftLayer? The IT infrastructure (servers to be precise) accounts for less than 5 percent of their capital expenditure (CAPEX) as opposed to almost 95 percent for Internet-centric companies.

Will the same value proposition work for both Internet-centric and non-Internet-centric companies?

With Internet-centric companies (where servers constitute up to 95 percent of CAPEX), the majority of the workforce is server-savvy. This means there is a very high chance any contact we have with these companies will be with a server-savvy fellow. Selling SoftLayer will then be a question of how SoftLayer’s USPs differentiate from the competition.

The current industry trend is driving a faulty message: The cloud is a commodity.

The truth is: Unlike basic commodities (electricity, gas, or cable), where there is little or no differentiation between what the end user gets irrespective of the provider, cloud and hosting in general are different. This faulty commodity-based assumption drives the price wars in cloud computing.

Comparing apples and oranges cumulus and stratus.

To test and disprove this theory, I brought a customer’s systems engineer (a server expert) into a sales discussion with the CTO.

I requested to put the price negotiations on hold for about 4 hours, and evaluate the services first. To do this, I asked for the exact configuration that the customer had hosted with a competitor. I ordered the exact configuration on the SoftLayer platform and within 2 hours the servers were ready. When the customer’s system engineer tested the performance of the SoftLayer server and compared it to what they had from a competitor, the price comparison was thrown out the window for good.

There are many different facets wherein SoftLayer outperforms the competition but unfortunately, most prospective customers only see price.

For the non-Internet-centric companies, to reach the price discussion is a milestone in itself. Pricing negotiations only begin when the need and suitability (originality) have been established.

The IBM and SoftLayer effect.

As a salesperson, I subscribe to the SCOTSMAN Sales Qualification Matrix (Solution, Competition, Originality, Timescales, Size, Money, Authority, and Need). Most companies in this group need solutions. IaaS is just part of that solution. This is where IBM (Big Blue) comes into the picture. As a service giant in the IT Sector, IBM can and will build on SoftLayer’s IaaS prowess to conquer this landscape. The synergies that are coming from this acquisition will send shockwaves across the industry.

Question is: Will the stakeholders maximize this potential to the fullest?

- Valentine Che, Global Sales, AMS01

September 22, 2014

Becoming a SLayer in Hong Kong

When I came on board at SoftLayer, the company was at the beginning of a growth period. IBM had just invested $1.2 billion to build 15 new data centers all over the world including one in Hong Kong—I was excited to get to work there!

Before I joined the Hong Kong data center’s Go Live Team as a server build tech, I went through a lengthy interview process. At the time, I was working for a multinational bank. But after the Chinese New Year, something inside me said it was time to take on a new challenge. Many people in Chinese cities look for new opportunities around the New Year; they believe it will give them luck and fortune.

After much anticipation (and interviews and paperwork), my first day was finally here. When I arrived at the SoftLayer data center, I walked through glass security doors and was met by Jesse Arnold, SoftLayer’s Hong Kong site manager; Russell Mcguire, SoftLayer’s Go Live Team leader whom I met during my interview process; and Shahzad, my colleague who was also starting work that day.

Shahzad and I felt very welcomed and were excited to be joining the team. During our first-day tour, I took a deep breath and said to myself, “You can do this Ying! This is transition, and we never stop learning new things in life.” Learning new things can be challenging. It involves mental, physical, and emotional strength.

Inside the Data Center: Building Racks!

When our team began to build racks and work with cables it was uncharted, but not totally unfamiliar territory for me. For a time, I worked as a seafarer cadet electrician on a container ship. I have worked with cables, electric motors, and generators before—it was just in the middle of the ocean. So, needless to say I know cables, but SFP cables were new. With the help of my colleagues and the power of the Internet, I was on my way and cabling the data center in no time.

When we build a server, we check everything: the motherboard, processors, RAM, hard drives, and most importantly, OS compatibility. After learning those basics, I started to look at it like a big puzzle that I needed to solve.

Inside the Data Center: Strong Communication!

That wasn’t the only challenge. In order to do my job successfully and adhere to data center build procedures, I had to learn the best way to communicate with my colleagues.

In the data center, our team must relay messages precisely and provide all the details to ensure every step in the build-out process is done correctly. Jesse constantly reminds us what is important: communication, communication, communication. He always repeats it three times to emphasize it as a golden rule. To me, this is one sign of a successful leader. I’m glad Jesse has put a focus on communication because it is helping me learn what makes a good leader and SLayer.

Inside the Data Center: Job Satisfaction!

I am so happy to be working at SoftLayer. All the new challenges I’ve been faced with remind me of Nike’s slogan: Just Do It! And our young team is doing just that. We work six days a week for 14 hours a day. And for all of that time, I use my mental and physical strength to tackle my new job.

I’ve learned so much and am excited to expand the knowledge base I already have, so I can be a stronger asset to the SoftLayer team.

I consider myself a SLayer that is still-in-training because there is more to being a SLayer than just building racks. SLayers are the dedicated people that work at SoftLayer, and they’re my colleagues. As my training continues, I look forward to learning more and to continue gaining more skills. I don't want to get old without learning new things!

For all our readers in Asia below you will find the blog in Mandarin translation!

在我刚刚来到SoftLayer的时候,它正处于发展的初级阶段。那时候,IBM公司正投资了120万在世界各地建立数据中心,其中一个在香港。我非常荣幸我可以在这里工作!

在我加入香港数据中心——Go Live Team,成为一个服务器构建技术员以前,我经历了一个很长的面试过程。当时,我正在为一家跨国银行工作。然而,中国农历新年以后,我的内心告诉我,是时候要迎接新的挑战了。很多中国人在新年的时候寻求新的工作机会,他们相信,这会给他们带来好运和财富。

经过一番前期工作(还有采访和文书工作),我终于迎来了新的第一天。当我来到SoftLayer数据中心的时候,我穿过玻璃安全门,见到了SoftLayer香港站的经理——Jesse Arnold,我曾经采访时遇到的SoftLayer里Go Live Team的组长——Russell Mcguire,还有Shahzad,和我一样第一天开始工作的同事。

Shahzad和我都觉得非常的开心和兴奋能够加入这个组。在我们第一天工作的时候,我深深地吸了一口气,对自己说:你可以做到!这是一个进步的过程。我们从不会停止学习新的东西。学习新的东西是很有挑战性的,它包含了心理、身体和精神的力量。

在数据中心里面:建筑架!
当我们的团队开始构建建筑架和电缆的时候,它们都是新的东西。但不是完全不熟悉它们。以前,我的工作是在集装箱船的海员电工。那时候我的工作和电缆、发动机、发电机打交道,虽然它们都只是在海里,但是,我很确定我了解电缆,我很容易的上手了数据中心的工作。

当我们建立一个服务器的时候,我们得检查每一样东西:主板、处理器、内存、硬盘,还有最重要的,操作系统的兼容性。了解了这些基本的东西以后,我把它当做一个摆在面前的难题,认真地对待。

在数据中心里面:很强的沟通能力!
这并不是唯一的挑战。为了成功地做好我的工作,在建立数据中心的过程中,我必须学会用最佳方式和我的同事沟通。

在数据中心,我们的的团队必须精确地传送信息,并提供所有的细节,以确保扩建过程中每一个步骤正确地完成。Jesse不断地提醒我们,沟通交流是非常重要的。他强调沟通是黄金规则。对我来说,这是一个成功领导者的标志之一。我很高兴Jesse已经把重点放在沟通作为重点,因为它帮助我学习,什么是一名优秀的领导者。

在数据中心里面:工作满意度!
我很高兴可以在SoftLayer工作。面对所以新的挑战,我都度自己说:放手去做!我们年轻的团队都在努力。我们每周工作六天,每天14小时。那段时间内,我把我所有的精力都投入到了我的新工作中。

我从我的经历中学到了很多,增长了很多知识。所以我可以说,我给SoftLayer团队带来了价值。

我把自己当做一个让在学习进步的技术员,因为一个技术员不仅仅要会构架。精英是在SoftLayer执着工作的人们,他们是我的同事。由于我正处于训练学习阶段,我期待学习更多知识和技能。活到老,学到老!

- Ying

September 17, 2014

SoftLayer Asia Roadshow Kick-starts its 5 City Tour

To help developers understand the benefits of the cloud and how to make their business scalable with the Softlayer environment, SoftLayer, in partnership with e27, is excited to announce the SoftLayer Asia Roadshow. The roadshow will stop in five cities:

  • Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia — October 1, 2014
  • Jakarta, Indonesia — October 3, 2014
  • Hong Kong — October 8, 2014
  • Bangkok, Thailand — October 10, 2014
  • Singapore — October 15, 2014

Designed as a half-day workshop with SoftLayer product and technical mentors, attendees will interact with instructors on how SoftLayer solutions scale and perform the way they do. The team will also take you through real business cases of how technical teams improved their performances in industries such as e-commerce, social media, and mobile gaming.

What you can expect at the workshop:

  • Practical and technical advice that you can apply immediately to help resolve trouble spots and improve performance in your organization’s IT environment
  • Learn how SoftLayer servers are provisioned so that you can build your own public and private node virtual servers
  • Learn and leverage SoftLayer Application Programming Interface (API) to interact with your account, products, and services

Who you will meet:

SoftLayer Road Show

Interested?

If you are a startup, developer, or an entrepreneur looking to hone your cloud skills then this workshop is for you. Since there are limited seats in each location, visit www.e27.co/softlayer to register, and the team will get back to you.

-Namrata

August 28, 2014

Dude, how do I get into the cloud?

I know you may think that’s just a catchy title to get you to read my blog, but it’s not. I’ve actually had someone ask me that at a party. In fact, that’s the first thing anyone asks me when they find out I work for SoftLayer. The funny thing is, everyone is already in the cloud—they just don’t realize it! To make my point, I pick up their smart phone and tell them they already are in the cloud, and walk away. That, of course, sparks more conversation and the opportunity to educate my friends and family on the magic and mystery that is the cloud. But truthfully, it really is a very simple concept:

  • On demand
  • Compute
  • Consumption-based billing

That’s it. At its core. But if you want more detail, check out this document: NIST.

And, just to shed light on the backend of what the cloud is, well, it’s nothing but servers. I know, you were expecting something more exciting—maybe unicorns and fairy dust. But it’s not. We house the servers. We care for them daily. We store them and protect them. All from our data center.

What makes SoftLayer stand out from others in the cloud space is that we offer more than one-size-fits-all servers. We offer both public and private virtual servers like other cloud providers, but we also offer highly customizable and high performance bare metal, servers. And as with any good infrastructure, we offer all the ancillary services such as load balancing, firewalls, attached storage, DNS, etc…

There’s no magic involved here. We’ve simply taken your infrastructure and removed your capex and headache. You’re welcome.

So when you hear “The Cloud,” don’t be mystified, and don’t feel inadequate. Now you too can be the cloud genius at your next party. When they talk cloud, just say things like, “Oh yeah, it’s totally on demand computing that bills based on consumption.” Chicks dig that, trust me.

-Cheeku

August 26, 2014

Bare Metal Power. By the Hour.

Think quickly. You hear that your new app will be featured on the front page of TechCrunch in less than two hours. Because it’s a resource-intensive application you know that a flood of new users will bog down its current cloud infrastructure and you’ll need to scale out.

What do you do? Choose virtual servers to guarantee quick deployment and more flexibility? Opt for bare metal servers to deliver the best user experience (while crossing your fingers that the servers are online in time for the flood of traffic)? In times like these, you shouldn’t have to choose between flexibility and power.

You need hourly bare metal servers.

We’ve streamlined the deployment of four of our most popular bare metal configurations, and with that speed, we’re able to offer them with hourly billing! With the hardware pre-configured, you tell us where you want the server to be provisioned—Dallas, San Jose, Washington D.C., London, Toronto, Amsterdam, Singapore, and Hong Kong—and which operating system you’d like us to install— CentOS, Red Hat, FreeBSD, or Ubuntu. And in less than 30 minutes, your server will be online, fully integrated with your other SoftLayer servers and services, and ready for you.

Use the server for as long as you need it. Spin it down when you’re done. Pay for the hours you had it on your account. It’s that easy. No virtualization. No noisy neighbors. Just your computing-intensive workload, the hardware configuration you need, and a phobia-proof commitment.

Why you need hourly bare metal servers in your cloud life?

  • Processing Power: You have short-term workloads that require significant amounts of processing power. To get the same performance from virtual servers, you might have to provision twice as many nodes or run them for twice as long.
    • Example: a business intelligence ELT (Extract/Load/Transform) application.
  • Schedule-based Workloads: You have a number of applications that require compute and storage resources on a set schedule (i.e., once every month), and you don’t want to deploy (and pay for) high-end machines that will sit idle at all other times.
    • Example: payroll processing or claims payment processing.
  • Performance Testing: Certify or validate how an application performs on a specific hardware configuration.
    • Example: Software or mobile application companies can validate performance on specific hardware platforms.

With bare metal performance available on demand and on hourly terms, you don’t have to compromise performance for flexibility. When TechCrunch comes calling, you have peace of mind that your app’s success and popularity won’t bring it down.

-RJ

July 16, 2014

Vyatta Gateway Appliance vs Vyatta Network OS

I hear this question almost daily: “What’s the difference between the Vyatta Network OS offered by SoftLayer and the SoftLayer Vyatta Gateway Appliance?” The honest answer is, from a software perspective, nothing. However from a deployment perspective, there are a couple fundamental differences.

Vyatta Network OS on the SoftLayer Platform

SoftLayer offers customers the ability to spin up different bare metal or virtual server configurations, and choose either the community or subscription edition of the Vyatta Network operating system. The server is deployed like any other host on the SoftLayer platform with a public and private interface placed in the VLANs selected while ordering. Once online, you can route traffic through the Vyatta Network server by changing the default gateway on your hosts to use the Vyatta Network server IP rather than the default gateway. You have the option to configure ingress and egress ACLs for your bare metal or virtual servers that route through the Vyatta Network server. The Vyatta Network server can also be configured as a VPN end point to terminate Internet Protocol Security (IPSEC), Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE), or OpenSSL VPN connections, and securely connect to the SoftLayer Private Network. Sounds great right?

So, how is a Vyatta Network OS server different from a SoftLayer Vyatta Gateway Appliance?

A True Gateway

While it’s true that the Vyatta Gateway Appliance has the same functionality as a server running the Vyatta Network operating system, one of the primary differences is that the Vyatta Gateway Appliance is delivered as a true gateway. You may be asking yourself what that means. It means that the Vyatta Gateway Appliance is the only entry and exit point for traffic on VLANs you associate with it. When you place an order for the Vyatta Gateway Appliance and select your public and private VLANs, the Vyatta Gateway Appliance comes online with its native VLAN for its public and private interfaces in a transit VLAN. The VLANs you selected are trunked to the gateway appliance’s public and private interfaces via an 802.1q trunk setup on the server’s interface switch ports. These VLANs will show up in the customer portal as associated VLANs for the Vyatta Gateway Appliance.

This configuration allows SoftLayer to create an outside, unprotected interface (in the transit VLAN) and an inside, protected interface (on your bare metal server or virtual server VLAN). As part of the configuration, we set up SoftLayer routers to static route all IP space that belongs to the associated VLANs to the Vyatta Gateway Appliance transit VLAN IP address. The servers you have in a VLAN associated with gateway appliance can no longer use the SoftLayer default gateway to route in and out of the VLAN. All traffic must be filtered through the Gateway Appliance, making it a true gateway.

This differs from a server deployed with the Vyatta Network OS because hosts behind the Vyatta Network OS server can route around it by simply changing their default gateway back to the SoftLayer default gateway.

N-Tier Architecture

Another difference is that the gateway appliance gives customers the option to route multiple public and private VLANs in the same pod (delineated by an FCR/BCR pair) through the device. This allows you to use the gateway appliance to create granular segmentation between different VLANs within your environment, and set up a traditional tiered infrastructure environment with ingress and egress rules between the tiers.

A server running Vyatta Network OS cannot be configured this way. The Vyatta Network OS server is placed in a single public and private VLAN, and there is no option to associate different VLANs with the server.

I hope this helps clear up the confusion around Vyatta on the SoftLayer platform. As always, if you have any questions or concerns about any of SoftLayer’s products or services, the sales and sales engineering teams are happy to help.

-Kelly

July 14, 2014

London Just Got Cloudier—LON02 is LIVE!

Summer at SoftLayer is off to a great start. As of today, customers can order SoftLayer servers in our new London data center! This facility is SoftLayer's second data center in Europe (joining Amsterdam in the region), and it's one of the most anticipated facilities we've ever opened.

London is the second SoftLayer data center to go live this year, following last month's data center launch in Hong Kong. In January, IBM committed to investing $1.2 billion to expand our cloud footprint, and it's been humbling and thrilling at the same time to prepare for all of this growth. And this is just the beginning.

When it comes to the Europe, Middle East, and Africa region (EMEA), SoftLayer's largest customer base is in the U.K. For the last two and a half years I’ve been visiting London quite frequently, and I've met hundreds of customers who are ecstatic to finally have a SoftLayer data center in their own backyard. As such, I'm especially excited about this launch. With this data center launch, they get our global platform with a local address.

The SoftLayer Network

Customers with location-sensitive workloads can have their data reside within the U.K. Customers with infrastructure in Amsterdam can use London to add in-region redundancy to their environments. And businesses that target London's hyper-competitive markets can deliver unbelievable performance to their users. LON02 is fully integrated with the entire SoftLayer platform, so bare metal and virtual servers in the new data center are seamlessly connected to servers in every other SoftLayer data center around the world. As an example of what that means in practice, you can replicate or integrate data between servers in London and Amsterdam data centers with stunning transfer speeds. For free. You can run your databases on bare metal in London, keep backups in Amsterdam, spin up virtual servers in Asia and the U.S. And your end users get consistent, reliable performance—as though the servers were in the same rack. Try beating that!

London is a vibrant, dynamic, and invigorating city. It's consistently voted one of the best places for business in the region. It's considered a springboard for Europe, attracting more foreign investors than any other location in the region. A third of world’s largest companies are headquartered in London, and with our new data center, we're able to serve them even more directly. London is also the biggest tech hub in-region and the biggest incubator for technology startups and entrepreneurs in Europe. These cloud-native organizations have been pushing the frontiers of technology, building their businesses on our Internet-scale platform for years, so we're giving them an even bigger sandbox to play in. My colleagues from Catalyst, our startup program, have established solid partnerships with organizations such as Techstars, Seedcamp and Wayra UK, so (as you can imagine) this news is already making waves in the U.K. startup universe.

For me, London will always be the European capitol of marketing and advertising (and a strong contender for the top spot in the global market). In fact, two thirds of international advertising agencies have their European headquarters in London, and the city boasts the highest density of creative firms of any other city or region in the world. Because digital marketing and advertising use cases are some of the most demanding technological workloads, we're focused on meeting the needs of this market. These customers require speed, performance, and global reach, and we deliver. Can you imagine RTB (real-time-bidding) with network lag? An ad pool for multinationals that is accessible in one region, but not so much in another? A live HD digital broadcast to run on shared, low-I/O machines? Or a 3D graphic rendering based on a purely virtualized environment? Just thinking about those scenarios makes me cringe, and it reinforces my excitement for our new data center in London.

MobFox, a customer who happens to be the largest mobile ad platform in Europe and in the top five globally, shares my enthusiasm. MobFox operates more than 150 billion impressions per month for clients including Nike, Heineken, EA, eBay, BMW, Netflix, Expedia, and McDonalds (as a comparison I was told that Twitter does about 7 billion+ a month). Julian Zehetmayr, the brilliant 23-year-old CEO of MobFox, agreed that London is a key location for businesses operating in digital advertising space and expressed his excitement about the opportunity we’re bringing his company.

I could go on and on about why this news is soooo good. But instead, I'll let you experience it yourself. Order bare metal or virtual servers in London, and save $500 on your first month service.

Celebrate a cloudy summer in London!

-Michalina

June 30, 2014

OpenNebula 4.8: SoftLayer Integration

In the next month, the team of talented developers at C12G Labs will be rolling out OpenNebula 4.8, and in that release, they will be adding integration with SoftLayer! If you aren't familiar with OpenNebula, it's a full-featured open-source platform designed to bring simplicity to managing private and hybrid cloud environments. Using a combination of existing virtualization technologies with advanced features for multi-tenancy, automatic provisioning, and elasticity, OpenNebula is driven to meet the real needs of sysadmins and devops.

In OpenNebula 4.8, users can quickly and seamlessly provision and manage SoftLayer cloud infrastructure through OpenNebula's simple, flexible interface. From a single pane of glass, you can create virtual data center environments, configure and adjust cloud resources, and automatic execution and scaling of multi-tiered applications. If you don't want to leave the command line, you can access the same functionality from a powerful CLI tool or through the OpenNebula API.

When the C12G Labs team approached us with the opportunity to be featured in the next release of their platform, several folks from the office were happy to contribute their time to make the integration as seamless as possible. Some of our largest customers have already begun using OpenNebula to manage their hybrid cloud environments, so official support for the SoftLayer cloud in OpenNebula is a huge benefit to them (and to us). The result of this collaboration will be released under the Apache license, and as such, it will be freely available to the public.

To give you an idea of how easy OpenNebula is to use, they created an animated GIF to show the process of creating and powering down virtual machines, creating a server image, and managing account settings:

OpenNebula

We'd like to give a big shout-out to the C12G Labs team for all of the great work they've done on the newest version of OpenNebula, and we look forward to seeing how the platform continues to grow and improve in the future.

-@khazard

Categories: 
June 9, 2014

Visualizing a SoftLayer Billing Order

In my time spent as a data and object modeler, I’ve dealt with both good and bad examples of model visualization. As an IBMer through the Rational acquisition, I have been using modeling tools for a long time. I can appreciate a nice diagram shining a ray of light on an object structure, and abhor a behemoth spaghetti diagram.

When I started studying SoftLayer’s API documentation, I saw both the relational and hierarchical nature of SoftLayer’s concept model. The naming convention of API services and data types embodies their hierarchical structure. While reading about “relational properties” in data types, I thought it would be helpful to see diagrams showing relationships between services and data types versus clicking through reference pages. After all, diagramming data models is a valuable complement to verbal descriptions.

One way people can deal with complex data models is to digest them a little at a time. I can’t imagine a complete data model diagram of SoftLayer’s cloud offering, but I can try to visualize small portions of it. In this spirit, after reviewing article and blog entries on creating product orders using SoftLayer’s API, I drew an E-R diagram, using IBM Rational Software Architect, of basic order elements.

The diagram, Figure 1, should help people understand data entities involved in creating SoftLayer product orders and the relationships among the entities. In particular, IBM Business Partners implementing custom re-branded portals to support the ordering of SoftLayer resources will benefit from visualization of the data model. Picture this!

Figure 1. Diagram of the SoftLayer Billing Order

A user account can have many associated billing orders, which are composed of billing order items. Billing order items can contain multiple order containers that hold a product package. Each package can have several configurations including product item categories. They can be composed of product items with each item having several possible prices.

-Andrew

Andrew Hoppe, Ph.D., is a Worldwide Channel Solutions Architect for SoftLayer, an IBM Company.

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