Softlayer Posts

March 4, 2016

Adventures with Bluemix

Keeping up with the rapid evolution of web programming is frighteningly difficult—especially when you have a day job. To ensure I don’t get left behind, I like to build a small project every year or so with a collection of the most buzzworthy technologies I can find. Nothing particularly impressive, of course, but just a collection of buttons that do things. This year I am trying to get a good grasp on “as a Service,” which seems to be everywhere these days. Hopefully this adventure will prove educational.

Why use services when I can do it myself?

The main idea behind “as a Service” is that somewhere out there in the cloud, someone has figured out how to do a particular task really well. This someone is willing to provide you access to that for a small service fee—thereby letting you, the developer, focus as much time as possible on your code and not so much time worrying about optimal configurations of things that you need to work efficiently.

SoftLayer is an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) provider, which is what will be the home for my little application—due in large part because I already have a ton of experience running servers myself.

I’m a big fan of Python, so I’m going to start programing with the Pyramids framework as the base for my new application. Like the “as a Service” offerings, programming frameworks and libraries exist to help the developer focus on their code and leverage the expertise of others for the auxiliary components.

To make everything pretty, I am going to use Bootstrap.js, which is apparently the de facto front-end library these days.

For everything else I want to use, there will be an attached Bluemix service. For the uninitiated, Bluemix is a pretty awesome collection of tools for developing and deploying code. At its core, Bluemix uses Cloud Foundry to provision cloud resources and deploy code. For now, I’m going to deploy my own code, but what I’m really interested in are the add-on services that I can just drop into my application and get going. The first service I want to try out is going to be Cloudant nosql, which is a managed couchDB instance with a few added features like a pretty neat dashboard.

Welcome to Bluemix

Combining Bluemix services with SoftLayer servers

One of the great things about services in Bluemix is that they can be provisioned in a standalone deployment—meaning Bluemix services can be used by any computer with an Internet connection and therefore, so can my SoftLayer servers. Since Bluemix services are deployed on SoftLayer hardware (in general, but there are some exceptions), the latency between SoftLayer servers and Bluemix services should be minimal, which is nice.

Creating a Cloudant service in Bluemix is as easy as hitting the Create button in the console. Creating a simple web application in Pyramid took a bit longer, but the quick tutorial helped me learn about all the cool things the Pyramid project can do. I also got to skip all the mess with SQLAlchemy, since I’m storing all the data in Cloudant. All that’s required is a sane ID system (I am using uuid) and some json. No need to get bogged down with a rigid table structure since Cloudant is a document store. If I want to change the data format, I just need to upload a new copy of the data, and a new revision of that document will be automatically created.

After cobbling together a basic application that can publish and edit content, all I had to do to make everything look like it was designed intentionally was to add a few bootstrap classes to my templates. And then I had a ready to use website!

Conclusion

Although making a web application is still as intensive as it’s always been, at least using technology in an “as a Service” fashion helps cut down on all the tertiary technologies you need to become an expert on to get anything to work. Even though the application I created here was pretty simple, I hope to expand it to include some of the more interesting Bluemix services to see what kind of Frankenstein application I can manage to produce. There are currently 100 Bluemix services, so I think the hardest part is going to be figuring out which one to use next.

-Chris

March 2, 2016

The SLayer Standard Vol. 2, No. 6: IBM InterConnect 2016 Round-Up

Another IBM InterConnect is in the books! As we get back to our daily routines, let’s reminisce on the announcements, innovations, and fun from last week in Vegas.

The conference started with some big news at the General Session. A new partnership between VMware and IBM was announced, letting you move to IBM Cloud while preserving your existing IT investments.

But that was only the tip of the iceberg; Robert LeBlanc, SVP of IBM Cloud, revealed several other major partnerships. The list included new relationships with Apple, GitHub, and Bitly, among others. Catch up with a breakdown of the major stories. Beyond the General Session, day one was full of breakout sessions, Solutions EXPO activities, and more.

 

Tuesday’s General Session focused on the topic of transformation. Our experts and customers took to the main stage at Mandalay Bay to talk about advancements in IT infrastructure for companies as vital to the adapting to change in the enterprise structure. The debut of the Server Challenge 3 also began to heat up on Tuesday, as buzz about Robert LeBlanc’s top score made the rounds.

The General Session on Wednesday focused on change and growth using IBM Watson, IBM Bluemix, and SoftLayer. The day was topped off by a performance from Sir Elton John, who rocked the MGM Grand Garden Arena.

Looking for more information on all the action from IBM InterConnect 2016? Check out IBM Cloud’s daily highlights blog. See you next year, Las Vegas!

-Rachel

Categories: 
February 17, 2016

Cloudocracy: Getting to the art of the matter with Artomatix

Who makes the servers hum in SoftLayer data centers around the world?

The SLayers are the brains and muscle beneath the SoftLayer cloud—and you had a chance to meet some of us in last year’s Under the Infrastructure series. But each firewall has two sides! And those servers would not be humming if not for our brilliant customers.

Today we’re launching a new series that will celebrate individuals and teams building on the SoftLayer cloud: the builders and founders, the creators and the disruptors, the developers and the architects, the dreamers and the visionaries, the inventors and the reformers. The Cloudocracy. 

We’re starting with Neal O’Gorman, co-founder and CTO of Artomatix. O’Gorman calls Artomatix the “artist’s personal slave robot.” The software uses machine learning-based artificial imagination to empower game dev studios that address mundane and dreary art creation tasks. Creating a beach full of pebbles or an army of zombies—with all the elements being unique—now takes minutes, not weeks, which can generate a tenfold increase in productivity. (For more details, read the complete case study here.)

At the GDC Game Developer Conference in San Francisco this spring, Artomatix will launch its inventive approach to generating video game art. We spoke to O’Gorman to find out more.

SOFTLAYER: Thank you for joining us today. Why don’t you start by telling us what Artomatix does?

O’GORMAN: Eric Risser, our co-founder, CTO, and the inventor of our incredible technology, built a game when he was a teenager and he was the artist on the team. He made a house and was delighted with it. Then he realized he had a whole village to create. From then on, he has been looking to solve that problem. Artomatix uses machine learning to quickly make high-quality variants of art assets.

SL: That sounds cool. We hear a lot about machine learning nowadays, but rarely about its use for creative applications. What do you do for Artomatix?

O’GORMAN: Unfortunately, what takes up too much time is funding. You close one funding round and go directly into the next. We’re in the process of closing our seed round. We received EU funding from the Creatify program, which helped us hire SoftLayer. We’ve also received funding from early stage investor NDRC, EU grants, and NVIDIA. We need to get to a point where revenues are coming in, which is the challenge for every startup. In the first year, we worked with companies who sent us art, we generated results, and sent it back. We validated that we were delivering the quality they needed. Then we had to build a product fast enough for them. With SoftLayer, being able to select bare metal servers and identify high-end GPUs gives us the speed we need.

SL: If you were stranded on a desert island, but you could take a few music albums and games with you, what would you bring?

O’GORMAN: Music hasn’t been a huge part of my life, but whatever you listen to in your teenage years ends up sticking. I’d definitely take the greatest Irish band that never made it out of Ireland, The Stunning.

SL: Were you in the band?

O’GORMAN: No! If you haven’t heard of them, and I suspect most people haven’t. Check them out.

For my game, the first one is definitely Quake. I got addicted in college and had to stop playing games because I was playing it too much.

For my next game, I’d say Texas Ask’Em Poker. I didn’t play for The Stunning, but I did create Texas Ask’Em Poker. When I lived in Germany, I was a quizmaster in the local Irish pub. I came across a poker company looking for new games and I had a eureka moment with the idea to put a quiz element into poker.

My final game would be Turrican on the Commodore 64 in the late 1980s. You run around, fly around, and just use your flamethrower. A classic!

SL: Pretty much everything on the Commodore is a classic, although some of the artificial intelligence was more artificial than intelligent in those days. I’ve seen a lot of talk recently about computers taking over creative jobs. Should video game artists feel threatened by your technology?

O’GORMAN: If there are Chinese whispers [the game more commonly known as “telephone”], artists might get concerned. But the reality is that we’re here to help artists spend more time being creative. We’re not replacing their creativity. We’re replacing their tedious, mundane tasks. With hybridization, we can take a few different concepts, iterate, and provide different ideas for the artist to choose from. Artomatix is always based on an example, and that needs an artist.

SL: Game developers can sleep easy! What kind of games will we be playing in 10 years, and how will we be playing them?

O’GORMAN: We’ll see a big push on virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). AR is much more intriguing because with VR you're closed off to the rest of world—you’re not living in the real world. For AR, one of the keys for success is that new art needs to be created on the fly, and it needs to be in sync with the environment the person is in. Picture you and your family sitting at breakfast. On the screen, there’s an extra chair at the table. It’s not an exact copy of another chair, but it fits in perfectly. Sitting in it is someone who looks like a family member, but not any particular one. And they’re a zombie.

SL: Scary stuff! Good luck with your launch!

O’GORMAN: Thank you!
 

 

-Michalina 

February 16, 2016

The SLayer Standard Vol. 2, No. 5: IBM InterConnect 2016 Edition

IBM InterConnect is almost here! To help you get the most out of your time at the conference (and so you’ll spend less time looking at your phone or conference guide), we’re giving you all the need-to-know info so you can keep up with us in Vegas.

The Top 10 SoftLayer Sessions at InterConnect

With so many sessions at InterConnect, it is easy to miss the best ones. To hone in on your session selections, we’ve made a list of our top 10 SoftLayer sessions (in our humble opinion). With more than 60 SoftLayer-related sessions to choose from, this will point you in the right direction. You won’t want to miss any of these: 

CCI-6675: Bringing High Performance Computing Capabilities to the Cloud
Jerry Gutierrez, Global HPC Sales Leader, SoftLayer, an IBM Company  & Todd Mostak, MapD
Monday, February 22 @ 10:30 am — Breakers G — Mandalay Bay SOUTH

CSD-6379: Cloud Infrastructure Directions: Save Time and Money by Exploiting IBM SoftLayer
Marc Jones, CTO Softlayer, an IBM Company
Monday, February 22 @ 12:00 pm — Mandalay Ballroom A — Mandalay Bay SOUTH

CCI-5348: Infrastructure as a Toolbox
Phil Jackson, Manager Sales Engineering, SoftLayer, an IBM Company
Monday, February 22 @ 12:00 pm — Breakers K — Mandalay Bay SOUTH

CCI-4061: SoftLayer Versus the Competition: A Price/Performance Evaluation of Cloud Providers
Matt Walli, Consulting Performance Engineer, IBM & Dan Lucky, Micro Strategies Inc.
Monday, February 22 @ 3:00 pm — Breakers K — Mandalay Bay SOUTH

DDD-3106: Elevate Your Continuous Delivery Strategy Above the Rolling Clouds
Michael Elder, Senior Technical Staff Member, IBM
Tuesday, February 23 @ 8:30 am — Mandalay Ballroom K — Mandalay Bay SOUTH

CCI-6240: NGames Shares Good Gaming Industry Experiences from Working With IBM SoftLayer
Sandala Wang, Mid- Market Client Rep, IBM
Tuesday, February 23 @ 10:00 am — Breakers K — Mandalay Bay SOUTH

CCI-2831: Everyday Infrastructure Challenges for Your Enterprise That Vanish with IBM SoftLayer
Sravan Akkapelly, Miracle Software Systems, Inc.
Wednesday, February 24 @ 10:00 am — Mandalay Ballroom D — Mandalay Bay SOUTH

YPS-2751: The Hybrid Cloud Built to Perform with POWER8 in IBM SoftLayer
Alise Spence, Power Systems Cloud Offering Manager & Bob Sullivan, Executive Project Manager - Power Integrated Offerings, IBM
Wednesday, February 24 @ 1:15 pm — Lagoon J — Mandalay Bay SOUTH

CLD-5118: Taking the Next Hot Mobile Game Live with Docker and IBM SoftLayer
Daniel Krook, Senior Software Engineer & Shaun Murakami, Lead Architect - IBM Cloud Labs, IBM; Scott Porter, Firemonkeys; Lennart Goedhart, Electronic Arts (EA) Melbourne Firemonkeys
Wednesday, February 24th @ 3:45 pm — Breakers L — Mandalay Bay SOUTH

CBP-4461: Integrating Private Cloud into Your Enterprise
Christopher Von Koschembahr, Executive IT Management Consultant, IBM & Melissa Maheux, TriDatum Solutions
Wednesday, February 24th @ 4:45 pm — Breakers J — Mandalay Bay SOUTH

The IBM Cloud Zone

When you’re in Mandalay Bay, drop in to the Solution Expo (South Convention Center, Level 1, Bayside C&D) and head over to the IBM Cloud Zone. That’s where you’ll find the Bluemix and SoftLayer hub. We’ll be doing live demos, showing you the power of our infrastructure in action. You’ll also find the beloved Server Challenge there—with a twist. 

Want more details on the Solution Expo? Download the IBM Events App for Android or Apple for even more conference details. 

Party time at IBM InterConnect

All work and no play make IBMers a dull bunch. After busy days at the conference, we’ll kick back, relax, and enjoy a performance from The Rocket Man himself, Sir Elton John! On Wednesday, February 24, IBM InterConnect and Rocket are sponsoring a performance just for IBM InterConnect attendees.

Prefer to shake it? Dust off those dancin’ shoes on Wednesday, February 24 and party like only IBM can at Hakkasan. From 8:00–10:00 pm, a bash featuring five levels of dance floors, DJs, food, private VIP spots, and your fellow InterConnect attendees caps off the night. Your badge is your ticket to the party.

See you next week in Las Vegas!

-Rachel  

 

Categories: 
February 3, 2016

Use TShark to see what traffic is passing through your gateway

Many of SoftLayer’s solutions make excellent use of the Brocade vRouter (Vyatta) dedicated security appliance. It’s a true network gateway, router, and firewall for your servers in a SoftLayer data center. It’s also an invaluable trouble-shooting tool should you have a connectivity issue or just want to take a gander at your network traffic. Built into vRouter’s command line and available to you, is a full-fledged terminal-based Wireshark command line implementation—TShark.

TShark is fully implemented in vRouter. If you’re already familiar with using TShark, you know you can call it from the terminal in either configuration or operational mode.  You accomplish this by prefacing a command with sudo; making the full command sudo tshark – flags.

tshark graphic

For those of us less versed in the intricacies of Wireshark and its command line cousin, here are a couple of useful examples to help you out.

One common flag I use in nearly every capture is –i (and as a side note, for those coming from a Microsoft Windows background, the flags are case sensitive). -i is a specific interface on which to capture traffic and immediately helps to cut down on the amount of information unrelated to the problem at hand. If you don’t set this flag, the capture will default to “the first non-loopback address;” or in the case of vRouter on SoftLayer, Bond0. Additionally, if you want to trace a packet and reply, you can set –i any to watch or capture traffic through all the interfaces on the device.

The second flag that I nearly always use to define a capture filter is –f, which defines a filter to match traffic against. The only traffic that matches this pattern will be captured. The filter uses the standard Wireshark syntax. Again, if you’re familiar with Wireshark, you can go nuts; but here are a few of the common filters I frequently use to help you get started:

  • host 8.8.8.8 will match any traffic to or from the specified host. In this case, the venerable Google DNS servers. 
  • net 8.8.8.0/24 works just like host, but for the entire network specified, in case you don’t know the exact host address you are looking for.
  • dst and src are useful if you want to drill down to a specific flow or want to look at just the incoming or outgoing traffic. These filters are usually paired with a host or net to match against.
  • port lets you specify a port to capture traffic, like host and net. Used by itself, port will match both source and destination port. In the case of well-known services, you can also define the port by the common name, i.e., dns.  

One final cool trick with the –f filter is the and and the negation not. They let you combine search terms and specifically exclude traffic in order to create a very finely tuned capture for your needs.

If you want to capture to a file to share with a team or to plug into more advanced analysis tools on another system, the –w flag is your friend. Without -w, the file will behave like a tcpdump and the output will appear in your terminal session. If you want to load the file into Wireshark or another packet analyzer tool you should make sure to add the –F flag to specify the file format. Here is an example:

Vyatta# sudo tshark –i Bond0 –w testcap.pcap –F pcap –f ‘src 10.128.3.5 and not port 80’

The command will capture on Bond0 and output the capture to a .pcap file called testcap.pcap in the root directory of the file system. It will match only traffic on bond0 from 10.128.3.5 that is not source or destination port 22. While that is a bit of a mouthful to explain, it does capture a very well defined stream! 

Here is one more example:

Vyatta#sudo tshark –I any –f ‘host 10.145.23.4 and not ssh’

This command will capture traffic to the terminal that is to or from the specified IP (10.145.23.4) that is not SSH. I frequently use this filter, or one a lot like it, when I am SSHed into a host and want to get a more general idea of what it is doing on the network. I don’t care about ssh because I know the cause of that traffic (me!), but I want to know anything else that’s going to or from the host.

This is all very much the tip of the iceberg; you can find a lot more information at the TShark main page. Hopefully these tips help out next time you want to see just what traffic is passing through your gateway.

- Jeff 

 

February 2, 2016

The SLayer Standard Vol. 2, No. 4

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

What does Marc Jones have to say about SoftLayer?

Our CTO Marc Jones sat down for an interview with Angel Diaz, IBM VP Cloud Technology & Architecture, host of IBM Cloud Dragon Dojo Series. Marc discusses his start at SoftLayer, the benefits of the SoftLayer cloud platform, dark fiber matter, and the importance of global reach. Instead of telling you what he said, you can watch it. 

Find a bit more about it here

IBM Watson business gets a new general manager.

IBM’s acquisition of the Weather Company is now complete, and that means a few changes are afoot. First, all of the Weather Company’s workloads are now running in IBM Cloud data centers. And second, David Kenny, who was the Weather Company CEO, is now in charge of Watson business.

In his new role, Kenny says his primary objective is to make Watson an even more robust platform and a leader in cognitive computing. In TechCrunch, he noted that the weather platform is not just about weather data. The massive amount of data that The Weather Channel takes in is used across various industries to help both companies and consumers make well-educated choices. All of this data will also be a boon to Watson as IBM continues to grow the AI platform with the Weather Company’s data sets.

“Obviously we ingest more weather data than others and process it in the cloud for pilots, insurers or farmers or ordinary citizens to make better informed decisions. But that platform can be reused for other unstructured data sets… this will be helpful for IBM in other business areas. What we have figured out at the Weather Company, and IBM will continue to explore across more IoT applications, is how to take data from lots of places and turn that into decisions to help make things work,” Kenny said.

Find out more about it here.

-Rachel  

Categories: 
January 29, 2016

Cloud, Interrupted: The Official SoftLayer Podcast, Episode 3

You’re never going to believe this. You already know the second episode of Cloud, Interrupted—the one, the only, the official SoftLayer podcast—hit the streets in December. And now, coming in hot, we’re bringing you the long-awaited third episode of Cloud, Interrupted—only a month after the last one! Contain your excitement. We’re getting good at this.

In the third episode of our authoritative, esteemed podcast, we discuss why our first podcasts were recorded in wind tunnels, we pat ourselves on the back for being doers and not scholars, and we reveal the humble, testosterone-fueled origins of the iconic Server Challenge.

Join Kevin Hazard, director of digital content, Phil Jackson, lead technology evangelist, and Teddy Vandenberg, manager of network provisioning, as they wreak havoc interrupting the world of cloud. Yet again.

You skipped that fluff-filled intro, didn’t you? We’ll reward your impatience with the CliffsNotes:

Cloud, Interrupted, Episode 3: In the end, you’ve gotta start somewhere.

  • [00:00:01] Yo yo yo, it’s the new and improved bleep bloops!
  • [00:00:25] We've finally stopped recording Cloud, Interrupted from our pillow forts. Now we just follow the mountains and valleys.
  • [00:04:23] So you want to host your own podcast? Cool. Take it from us on the ultimate, definitive, pretty-much-only guide to success: gear, software, and magical editing.
  • [00:06:24] Teddy takes us on a boring tangent about startups that’s not really a tangent at all. (You decide if it’s boring.)
  • [00:07:25] Ha ha, Kevin totally used to trick out his MySpace page.
  • [00:09:16] GOOD JOB, PHIL!
  • [00:09:26] Phil was THE most popular kid in school. That's how he started programming.
  • [00:13:40] There are two types of technical people: those that do and those that read the docs. Teddy doesn't read the docs. Ask him about YUM.
  • [00:17:59] C'mon, Kevin. No one wants to build a server at a conference for fun. What a dumb idea!

Oh Phil, Phil, Phil. Little did you know very how wrong you were. (Must’ve been the ponytail.)

- Fayza

January 25, 2016

The SLayer Standard Vol. 2, No. 3

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

UStream joins the IBM family.
IBM has announced an exciting new addition to the family. We would like to welcome UStream to the team and a new cloud video services unit they will join. TechCrunch reported, “Braxton Jarratt, who came to IBM as part of the ClearLeap deal, has been chosen to run this new unit. He says UStream gives the company that missing streaming piece that allows them to form this unit with a full-service enterprise video offering.”

Jarrett also said that IBM “plans to incorporate other pieces like Watson for analytics, something that customers were asking for around video delivery at CES earlier this month. They want to know information like how long people are engaged and what kinds of actions they can take to stop churn.”

Get for information on the deal here.

IBM Watson is the future of artificial intelligence.
The head of IBM Watson, Mike Rhodin sat down for an interview with Forbes to talk about the future of artificial intelligence.

Since Watson’s appearance on Jeopardy!, it started a time that Rhodin considers “in-market experimentation.” During that time they worked with major names in the healthcare industry that “wanted to start to experiment with the technology–not to play Jeopardy!, but to use the underlying technology to start to solve problems.”

Rhodin noted, “The second thing that was a key decision about the launch of the commercial project was the creation of an open ecosystem: we would open up the APIs on platforms so that startups could get access to the technology and start to build out businesses on top of it.” This led to the beginning of the Watson Group made up of a few customers and a little group of startups who utilized the technology. That is when the ecosystem project took off.

Learn more about how Watson works and where it is going here.

-Rachel

Categories: 
January 22, 2016

Using Cyberduck to Access SoftLayer Object Storage

SoftLayer object storage provides a low cost option to store files in the cloud. There are three primary methods for managing files in SoftLayer object storage: via a web browser, using the object storage API, or using a third-party application. Here, we’ll focus on the third-party application method, demonstrating how to configure Cyberduck to perform file uploads and downloads. Cyberduck is a free and open source (GPL) software package that can be used to connect to FTP, SFTP, WebDAV, S3, or any OpenStack Swift-based object storage such as SoftLayer object storage.

Download and Install Cyberduck

You can download Cyberduck here, with clients for both Windows and Mac. After the installation is complete, download the profile for SoftLayer object storage here. Choose any of the download links under the Connecting section; preconfigured locations won’t matter as the settings will be modified later.

Once the profile has been downloaded, it needs to be modified to allow the hostname to be changed. Open the downloaded file (e.g. Softlayer (Amsterdam).cyberduckprofile) in a text editor. Locate the Hostname Configurable key (<key>Hostname Configurable</key>), and change the XML tag following that from <false/> to <true/>. Once this change has been made, there are two options to load the configuration file: Move the file to the profiles directory where Cyberduck is installed (on Windows this will be C:\Program Files (x86)\Cyberduck\profiles by default), or double-click on the profile, and Cyberduck will add the profile.

Configure Cyberduck to Work with SoftLayer

Now that Cyberduck has been installed, it needs to be configured to connect to object storage in SoftLayer. You can do this by creating a bookmark in Cyberduck. With Cyberduck open, click on Bookmark in the main menu bar, then New Bookmark in the dropdown menu.

In the dropdown box at the top of the Bookmark window, select SoftLayer Object Storage (Name of Location).

In the dropdown box at the top of the Bookmark window, select SoftLayer Object Storage (Name of Location). Depending on the profile that was downloaded, the location may be different. When the SoftLayer profile has been selected, the configurable options for that profile will be displayed. Enter a nickname that will identify the object storage location.

Next, depending on which data center will store the objects, the server option in Cyberduck may need to be changed. To find out which server should be specified, open a web browser and log into the SoftLayer portal. Once in the portal click on Storage then Object Storage. Select the object storage account that will be used for this connection.

If no accounts exist, a new object storage account can be ordered by using the Order Object
Storage link located in the upper right-hand corner. After selecting the account, select the data center where the object storage will reside.

When the Object Storage page loads, there will be a View Credentials link under the object storage container dropdown box in the upper left section of the screen.

Clicking on that link will bring up a dialog box that contains the information necessary for creating a connection in Cyberduck. Because SoftLayer has both public and private networks, there are two authentication endpoints available. The setup for each endpoint is the same, but a VPN connection to the SoftLayer private network is necessary in order to use the private endpoint.

Here, we will be using the public endpoints. Select the server address for the public endpoint (see the blue highlighted text) and enter it into the server text box in Cyberduck.

Next, select the username. It will be in the format:

object_storage_account_name:softlayer_user_name.

Then enter it into the Username text box. (Make note of the API Key, it will be used later.)

Once those options have been set (Nickname, Server, and Username), close the new bookmark window. In the main Cyberduck window, you should see the newly created bookmark listed. Double-click on it to connect to the SoftLayer object storage.

At this point, Cyberduck will prompt for the API key. Use the API key noted above and Cyberduck will connect to SoftLayer object storage. Uploading files can be accomplished by selecting the files and dragging them to the Cyberduck window. Downloading can be accomplished by selecting a file in Cyberduck and dragging it to the local folder where it will be downloaded.

-Bryan Bush

January 18, 2016

The SLayer Standard Vol. 2, No. 2

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

Ford and IBM team up to take the hassle out of driving.
Ford announced a partnership with IBM Cloud to start a new platform to analyze transportation data. In an article by TechCrunch, “The new platform will use IBM’s cloud computing platform to analyze small slices of data to look for patterns and trends that could help drivers make better decisions about their driving—or whether they should maybe use another means of transportation.”

Ford began testing the platform to run its Dynamic Shuttle model on the Ford campus. Ford explains, “Should one of the Transit vans experience a malfunction that triggers a warning light, the platform will be able to start routing requests away from that vehicle to other Transits in service—allowing another shuttle to redeploy to keep all riders on schedule.”

Learn more about how Ford and IBM are helping drivers here.

Bluemix Social Sentiment App set to better fan experience at Australian Open.
The entire Australian Open 2016 experience will be hosted by IBM’s Continuous Available Services. In a blog post from IBM Bluemix Dev, “The component that provides a social endpoint, Social Sentiment Application, for fan experiences is hosted on a Bluemix hybrid cloud that follows several design principles: Cognitive Design, Microservices, High Availability, Parallel Functions and Disaster Avoidance.”

One highlight of the cognitive design is that it will allow for an engaging user experience, further developing the interactivity between people and machines. The post notes, “The system enables humans and machines to understand the crowd and their opinions focused around tennis players. Over time, the trend of tennis player sentiment is displayed through IBM’s SlamTracker, which learns player popularity movement. Humans interact with the Social Sentiment Application through Twitter, which has a direct impact on social sentiment.

Read more about the application’s design principles here.

IBM named a hybrid cloud leader by Forrester and Synergy.
Reports from both Forrester and Synergy Research highlighted IBM’s continued cloud growth in the hybrid arena. “These new reports further underscore the momentum IBM has gained among its customers that are increasingly turning to IBM for help connecting cloud services and applications to core systems that may always remain on-premises, due to such factors as regulatory compliance, control and cost.”

Forrester’s report studied many hybrid cloud solutions and noted, “Leaders such as IBM offer deep and broad support for pre-built application and infrastructure templates, powerful provisioning and configuration management, role-based controls, and rich cost, performance, and capacity management features.”

Learn more about Forrester’s and Synergy’s findings here.

-Rachel

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