Softlayer Posts

June 9, 2014

Visualizing a SoftLayer Billing Order

In my time spent as a data and object modeler, I’ve dealt with both good and bad examples of model visualization. As an IBMer through the Rational acquisition, I have been using modeling tools for a long time. I can appreciate a nice diagram shining a ray of light on an object structure, and abhor a behemoth spaghetti diagram.

When I started studying SoftLayer’s API documentation, I saw both the relational and hierarchical nature of SoftLayer’s concept model. The naming convention of API services and data types embodies their hierarchical structure. While reading about “relational properties” in data types, I thought it would be helpful to see diagrams showing relationships between services and data types versus clicking through reference pages. After all, diagramming data models is a valuable complement to verbal descriptions.

One way people can deal with complex data models is to digest them a little at a time. I can’t imagine a complete data model diagram of SoftLayer’s cloud offering, but I can try to visualize small portions of it. In this spirit, after reviewing article and blog entries on creating product orders using SoftLayer’s API, I drew an E-R diagram, using IBM Rational Software Architect, of basic order elements.

The diagram, Figure 1, should help people understand data entities involved in creating SoftLayer product orders and the relationships among the entities. In particular, IBM Business Partners implementing custom re-branded portals to support the ordering of SoftLayer resources will benefit from visualization of the data model. Picture this!

Figure 1. Diagram of the SoftLayer Billing Order

A user account can have many associated billing orders, which are composed of billing order items. Billing order items can contain multiple order containers that hold a product package. Each package can have several configurations including product item categories. They can be composed of product items with each item having several possible prices.

-Andrew

Andrew Hoppe, Ph.D., is a Worldwide Channel Solutions Architect for SoftLayer, an IBM Company.

May 29, 2014

Startups and BBQ – The New Memphis

BB King. Elvis. Graceland. Jerry Lee Lewis. Beale Street. Cotton. Shipping. Martin Luther King. Civil Rights on the national stage. All of these things come to mind when you think of Memphis, Tennessee. You can now add one more to that list: Startups.

Yep. That’s right. Startups.

Memphis has a long history of economic success. From the early days of its settlement, it was a shipping and trading hub for the early United States thanks to the Mississippi River. It progressed into one of the world’s largest cotton producers, even having a cotton exchange similar to the stock exchange on Wall Street. As our country grew, so did Memphis’ value because of geographic location. Today, more than 60 percent of the U.S. population is within a one-day drive of Memphis. It has grown into a logistics hub and houses several North American railway companies, as well as FedEx.

What’s awesome to see on my second stop of our 2014 small-market tour, is that there is an undercurrent happening in Memphis that is shifting the landscape of the economic success of the region to technology. And it’s happening through the leadership of folks like Eric Mathews and Patrick Woods. Mathews heads up StartCo, a regional accelerator with 20 startups, all of which have come to Memphis to develop their companies. Woods is in charge of a very unique program, started by A>M Ventures that helps early stage companies get the right message out about their products, who they are, and where they are going.

Our team met Woods at SXSW in 2013. Over the past year, we have worked together to help Woods’ outreach efforts by building a bridge from Memphis to Silicon Valley and through other early stage startup communities. We connected with Mathews at SXSW this year through one of our strongest partners, the Global Accelerator Network. Mathews was very convincing. He not only showed me a startup community that was thriving, but he also fed me world-class BBQ at the same time.

Did somebody say BBQ? You don’t really have to ask @KelleyHilborn or me twice. Our Pavlovian response kicked in and we had our flights booked before you could flip a coin.

Last week marked the annual celebration of Memphis’ BBQ Fest – one of the largest festivals of its kind in the world. It also marked the first week for the StartCo teams, and we were there to welcome them with some SoftLayer Catalyst goodness (as a side to that BBQ).

We met with all of the teams and were greeted by folks from all over the world. Teams from NYC, Europe, Silicon Valley, and even local Memphis were made up of entrepreneurs who were eager to hear about Catalyst and how we could connect them to our community. From big data companies, to analytics companies and even a company that manufactures a chip for your dog, these teams definitely have the smarts and character to disrupt and succeed.

Our office and mentor hours provided us a strong foundation to connect with the startups one-on-one. BBQ Fest and events with A>M Ventures, StartCo, and our friends from Keen.io gave us an opportunity to spend two full days with the entrepreneurs, getting a higher sense of where they hoped to take their businesses.

The teams in Memphis are just as hungry, innovative, capable, and smart as any we work with in our startup ecosystems around the world. What we loved most about our time in Memphis was how welcoming the local leaders were, and further how open-minded they are to making a positive impact on this world. The leadership that is building this tech ecosystem from the ground up is doing so in an open, communal, and giving way, which all tech ecosystems need to be built upon.

Because of this philosophy, they are ensuring their success. They’re creating a community based on collaboration and mutual success. It reminds me of cities like Boulder and Portland. These cities were built on the same principles, and they enjoy greater success than many other larger markets.

And SoftLayer was there at the beginning. We’re excited to watch this ecosystem grow, and to continue collaborating to help support people like Mathews, Woods and many others in Memphis who see the forest through the trees.

Next stop on the small market express…Kelowna, British Columbia. Our very own @gkdog will be delivering a keynote and sitting on a panel, instilling our community and strategic philosophies on his home Canadian turf.

-@JoshuaKrammes

May 2, 2014

Keyboard Shortcuts in the SoftLayer Customer Portal

I’m excited to introduce a new feature in the SoftLayer customer portal: Keyboard shortcuts!

Keyboard shortcuts give you quick access to the most commonly used features by simply typing a few characters. For those who prefer never having to reach for the mouse to navigate an application, you should find these handy additions quite helpful.

After you log into the Customer Portal, type “?” (shift + forward slash) on any page, and you'll see a full list of available keyboard shortcuts:

Keyboard Shortcuts

On the Keyboard Shortcuts help page, you have the option to enable or disable the functionality based on your preference. Keyboard shortcuts are enabled by default. Disabling this feature will turn off all keyboard shortcuts except the “?” shortcut so that you can access the enable/disable feature preference in the future if you change your mind. This preference is stored in a cookie in your browser, so changing computers or deleting your cookie will re-enable the feature.

The shortcuts are grouped into three sets: Global, Tabs, and Grids.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Global Navigation

You have the ability to navigate to any page in our application by typing in the respective position number in the menu combined with dashes (-). For example, typing 1-5-2 will open Support (1) > Help (5) > Portal Tour (2).

Use the “go to” key combinations to jump to a new location from anywhere in the portal. For example, type (g) and (d) to visit the Device List. Typing (g) and (u) allows you to access the list of portal users, and (g) and (t) takes you to view tickets. If you want to add a new ticket from anywhere in the portal, type (+) and (t). It’s that simple.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Tabs

Many of the pages within the portal have tabs that appear just above the main content of the page. These tabs often allow content to be filtered, or provide access to additional features related to the page topic. Each tab can be accessed by using a simple two-keystroke combination, such as (t) then (f) to reveal the Filter tab on the page.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Grids

Whenever a page contains a grid — a tabular listing — you can now perform common operations from the keyboard. Jump quickly from page to page (first/last or next/previous) or refresh the grid contents with a single keystroke.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Please give this new feature a try for yourself! We welcome your feedback. Please let us know if you would like to have us implement any other keyboard shortcuts in the future.

-Daniel

May 1, 2014

New App Release: SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

Today, the SoftLayer development team is launching a new platform accessibility tool for SoftLayer customers who want to easily manage their infrastructure from Windows. We've gotten a great response from the users of SoftLayer Mobile app for Windows Phone, so we turned our attention to creating an app for customers on Windows 8.1: SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1.

With a growing number of users adopting and embracing Windows 8.1 on their PCs, and the Windows Store is becoming a vibrant community of useful apps for those customers. There are more than 145,000 apps on the Windows Store, and that number is expected to increase exponentially following Microsoft’s recent introduction of "Universal Apps for Windows Phone 8.1 and Windows 8.1.” With all that goodness and an expanding market, it was imperative for our mobile development team to build an app for customers using Windows 8.1 as their default OS or carrying Windows RT tablets.

Why Windows 8.1?

Our team wants to provide simple, efficient ways for customers to connect to SoftLayer infrastructure and perform any necessary management tasks while on-the-go. Our team is inspired by the power of connected devices in Windows ecosystem. By developing an app for Windows 8.1, we will slowly bring the phone, tablet and PC onto one streamlined platform — a concept many smart devices are adopting quickly.

What’s Fresh?

New Dashboard

The SoftLayer Mobile app for Windows 8.1 is a fresh new approach to its Windows Phone sibling. The app provides a dashboard view after authentication that provides a snapshot of some of the most commonly used information and controls in the portal.

Currently, the dashboard supports four different panels: Tickets, devices, accounting and bandwidth. All display an overview of relevant information for you and your environment. The dashboard also allows you to quickly add a ticket or make a one-time payment on your account.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

In-line Ticket Updates

In the new tickets module, you can update tickets without ever leaving the page. This functionality is similar to what you see on many social websites, and it's integrated to be seamless.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

Search Everywhere!

One of the coolest additions to the new app is the introduction of search functionality in each module. Now, you can search a ticket, a device, or an invoice by just typing into the search box! The search capability lets you spend less time scrolling and more time working.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

Bandwidth Display

Smart phones have apps that measure and report how much data you are using, and your infrastructure should be similarly transparent Bandwidth usage is an important aspect of server management, so we built the bandwidth module to show your infrastructure's public and private traffic for current and previous billing cycles. This view also helps you see when a server is about to reach its limits so that you can plan accordingly.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

The module provides two ways to look at the data:

  • In a tabular form by clicking the “Show/Hide Traffic Details” button.
  • In a graphic representation by clicking the “View Graph” button.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

Same Functionality. Better Experience.

Sometimes change is not always needed for a nicely crafted feature. The new app keeps the same feature richness of the Windows Phone app and arranges it in a user-friendly way. For example, in the devices module, you can navigate to between different tabs to get the information you need, from password lists and attached tickets to a specific device or monitoring alarms.

The “Remote Control” section on the module allows you to perform actions such as rebooting, power cycles, restarts and pinging servers. In addition, you can view hardware and software installed on the device along with the hardware and network components attached. In the current phone version, you can only see the root password for the device, but in the Windows 8.1 app, you see all passwords for the server.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

What's Next?

During the development of this app, the team's goal was to test to adopt a framework that would be ideal for scaling. More and more developers are adopting a Model-View-Model (MVVM) approach to mobile and web app development, so our goal was to use that approach for this project. The significant challenge we faced when adopting this approach was finding a well-supported framework that met our application's needs. We weren't able to find suitable frameworks that committed regular updates in SDKs or in APIs, so we ended up using the same MVVM principles without any underlying framework. In the end, the project allowed us to create our own framework for future projects!

There are many exciting features that are lined up for the Windows 8.1 app. Download it now: SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

After you try it out, please submit your feedback ... We want to keep improving the app by providing the features and functionality that matter most to you.

-Imran

April 29, 2014

The Media Industry is Making the Move to Cloud

Rumor has it that at the entire rendering of James Cameron’s “Avatar” using 3DFusion required more than 1 petabyte of storage space. This is equivalent to 500 hard drives of 2 terabytes each, or a 32 year-long MP3 file! The computing power behind this would consist of about 34 racks, each with 4 chassis containing 32 machines. All of that adds up to roughly 40,000 processors and 104 terabytes of RAM.

High-res, long-form media files that can reach hundreds of gigabytes of storage are regular phenomena in the media industry. Whether it’s making the next “Avatar” or creating the next big, viral ad campaign, technology is fundamental to the media industry. But, the investment required to set these up is enough to boggle the mind and dissuade even the high risk-takers. So, why buy when you can rent?

Cloud allows you to rent, own, use, and return the infrastructure with no capex. That gives users access to unlimited compute power, including servers, network, storage, firewalls, and ancillary services, all available on demand, with pay-as-you-go billing offered hourly or monthly.

Cloud services are an increasingly viable avenue for the industry to leverage and support the performance needs of online media storage, as well as collaboration environment. The benefits of a customizable approach to the cloud include: digital archives, production support, broadcast facility resiliency, high-intensity processing, and derivatives manufacturing for transcoding and encrypting. An on-demand, scalable infrastructure is the next step toward reducing production and operations costs, simplifying data access, and delivering content faster to the end user.

This year at ad:tech asean, SoftLayer will present on how the media industry is utilizing cloud infrastructure. So, I thought this would be a good opportunity to share some interesting customer stories about media companies at the top of their games and successfully growing their businesses on the cloud. Here are two of those stories.

The Loft Group, an Australian creative digital agency, specializes in creating e-learning campaigns for global brands. The company won a contract with cosmetics giant L’Oreal but realized that in order to go big with their platform, they needed technology that provided their support team with the necessary analytics. The Loft Group selected SoftLayer as the cloud platform for its digital e-learning campaigns. Moving their services to the cloud helped the company achieve global scale, consistent performance across multiple countries and grow at a pace which slashed a 3- to 5-year transformation timeline down to just months.

According to eMarketer’s forecast, global e-commerce sales will top $1.2 trillion by 2016. That growth is projected to continue by 20 percent every year. Ad personalization is playing a larger part in maximizing e-commerce business. To keep up with the demands of real-time ad personalization, companies like Struq, an ad personalization platform, require an infrastructure that can process high volumes at high speeds.

Struq offers highly targeted ad campaigns across a range of promotional platforms. The company often handles more than 2 terabytes of raw event data every day, processing more than 95 percent of requests in fewer than 30 milliseconds. And when the company’s growing European customer base demanded immediate server allocation, Struq turned to SoftLayer for scalability. We were able to offer on-demand provisioning as well as the low latency their customers required. A detailed story of how Struq achieved the requisite scalability and success with SoftLayer is available here.

More stories to come, so stay tuned! In the meantime, you can hear more customer stories during the first leg of ad:tech asean, a prelim roadshow in Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur and Bangkok.

-@namrata_kapur

April 17, 2014

Deep in the Heart of Te(ch)xas: SXSW 2014

SXSW 2014 was bigger and crazier than ever. For anyone who has been sleeping under a rock, SXSW is one of the largest, most intense start-up technology, music, and film festivals on the planet. Held in March, SXSW turns Austin, Texas, into the global epicenter of everything (startup) technology.

As in years past, SoftLayer hosted the Speakeasy lounge, a daytime co-working space and community/networking lounge in the evening. For the second straight year, the lounge blew our expectations out of the water. Over the course of 48 hours, we saw over a thousand partners, start-up clients, fellow colleagues, and members of the global start-up community come through the doors. To give you an idea of how “global” the community was, I walked through the lounge at one point and heard six different languages being spoken.

Our start-up partners used the lounge to escape the chaos of the festival so they could get work done. In the space, they could relax, send emails, connect with clients and friends, or just find some peace and quiet away from the cacophonous show floor (and even-noisier 6th Street).

Catalyst Lounge SXSW 2014

One of the biggest highlights at SXSW for the Catalyst team was a panel that I moderated about building meaningful, organic communities around brands. The panelists for this discussion were George Karidis, COO of SoftLayer; Ben Rigby, CEO of Sparked; Samar Birwadker, CEO of Good.co; and Justin Johnson, director of developer evangelism for Keen.io. The group explained how their brands’ approaches to community engagement helped them build momentum and succeed faster, and I was humbled to hear how the SoftLayer Catalyst program impacted their decisions shaping their own communities. To cap off the session, the panelists also brought up the benefits of using Catalyst for testing and scaling during their early stages, so they could understand how to use the infrastructure as they grew. You need look no further for validation of our model than to have three of our most successful clients attributing their success to it.

In addition to the Speakeasy and the panel discussion, SoftLayer was also well represented on the SXSW show floor. Over the course of the show, clients, partners, and prospects stopped by to try their hands at the Server Challenge, and we had some phenomenal conversations about the future of the cloud and how SoftLayer is forging a new path in the infrastructure as a service game.

What a lot of people don’t realize about SXSW is that the majority of business gets done outside of the show floor. Each night presents opportunities to connect with and learn about individuals in the global start-up community. For example, Catalyst partner Planwise held a party and barbecue where they discussed best practices for start-ups in financial technology. We got in on the fun as well when we partnered with Techstars to host one of the hottest parties at SXSW Interactive. DJed by Thievery Corporation and attended by over a thousand guests, if you managed to get a hard-to-come-by ticket, you had a great time and met a lot of amazing people.

SoftLayer & Techstars Party SXSW 2014

Over the years, SXSW has proven to be a melting pot for creativity and innovation on a global scale. As businesses look for new ways to gather and present information, providers like SoftLayer become an integral part of their approaches. Our goal with Catalyst is to stay front-and-center in the startup movement … So it’s a safe bet that you’ll see us again at SXSW 2015.

-@joshuakrammes

April 14, 2014

OpenSSL Heartbleed Update

On April 7th, the OpenSSL Project released an update to address a serious security flaw (CVE-2014-0160), which allows remote attackers to obtain sensitive information from process memory via crafted packets that trigger a buffer over-read, as demonstrated by reading private keys, related to d1_both.c and t1_lib.c, aka the Heartbleed bug.

SoftLayer Infrastructure

After notification of this vulnerability we began a close examination of our services to determine any that may have been affected. Both the SoftLayer customer portal and API are serviced behind hardware load balancers and neither the hardware load balancers nor the software running on the servers behind them were found to be running vulnerable versions of OpenSSL. This was confirmed by the hardware vendor and direct testing as well. During these tests it was discovered that certain nodes of our Object Storage cluster were running a vulnerable version of OpenSSL. The software was immediately patched to remediate the issue. Although there is no indication that this vulnerability was exploited, the subset of customers potentially affected has been advised of precautionary measures to ensure continued security.

Additionally, our team forced updates to all of our internal operating system update mirrors as soon as patched versions were released by their publishers. Our system automatically checks for and updates all operating system versions hosted on our mirrors, but due to the urgency of this exploit, manual updates were run as quickly as possible to have patched versions available sooner.

SoftLayer Customers

Due to the nature, surface area, and severity of this vulnerability, we recommend revoking all possibly compromised keys and reissuing new certificates for any service secured using the OpenSSL library. The rekeying process can vary depending on your Certificate Authority (CA) and you should contact them if you have questions on how to complete this process. This OpenSSL vulnerability has major security implications for a wide range of operating systems and applications and may necessitate rebooting your hardware (or restarting services) to ensure all services linking against the affected code use the updated version of the OpenSSL library. We also recommend that you patch all of your servers and change passwords as soon as possible. Take this opportunity to review your overall password strategy including password strength and password sharing across sites.

-@skinman454

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April 3, 2014

Sprint Accelerator Spices Up Silicon Prairie

As part of the community development team here at SoftLayer, I get to travel the world and reach into cities to help local, born-on-the-Web communities grow and prosper. Last week, my travels took me (and my rock star team) to Kansas City, where we were invited to mentor startups in the Sprint Mobile Health Accelerator powered by TechStars (PBTS).

I know when you think of KC, you might not think of a technology startup community. As part of Silicon Prairie, where startups and tech are thriving, KC is taking its place amongst US tech communities, as companies like Sprint, Garmin, H&R Block, and Hallmark are investing in the local startup community.

Through the course of the days I spent in KC, we talked to 10 startups and held technical office hours. What we learned is that the startups in this accelerator had all of the qualities we hope to find: grit and determination coupled with brains and insane talent. (And some of the teams we met with are growing so quickly that they even have open positions.)

What struck me most from my trip was the sheer fact that even though I live in the epicenter of all things tech startup, I can see with my own eyes that the rest of the world is catching up––and they are doing so quickly. Most of the teams at Sprint PBTS are not from the startup mega cities like New York and San Francisco. They are from places off the beaten path. I’m happy to see it, and I’m even more excited for my trips later this year to other parts of the country like Memphis, Detroit, and Okanagan, where I’m sure to be as impressed as I was with KC.

True, for the time being the venture capital and investment communities will likely still steer startups toward the Bay Area, but I’m not convinced that is a trend that will continue forever. I’m more and more certain that as we advance technologies—and as SoftLayer maintains its edge in building the best platform on which to create them––geography will become a secondary factor in the success of startups.

Our Catalyst Startup Program provides that platform for early stage startups around the globe. Members have innovative concepts that need reliable infrastructure to support their growth from idea to enterprise. Recently, I sat down in front of a camera to share an overview of the program and it's benefits from the perspective of Catalyst member HAUL. Here is a crash course on Catalyst:

I believe in a year, a few of the teams from the Sprint Mobile Health Accelerator will combine forces to create one company that will eventually become a household name. Their evolution will be fun to watch from the beginning to end. And we are going to watch them closely. They’re going to do it, and we are going to be with them every step of the way.

-@joshuakrammes

March 19, 2014

An Inside Look at IBM Cloud Event 2014 in Hong Kong

On March 17 in Hong Kong, IBM and SoftLayer successfully concluded the first of many intimate cloud events. IBM Cloud Event 2014 marked the beginning of the $1.2 billion investment committed towards our global expansion plans.

Growing from 13 to 40 data centers is no mean feat, and Hong Kong is the starting point. Not only does this give our customers data redundancy in Asia-Pacific, but also provides data residency to our Hong Kong-based customers. Quite simply, we are growing where you want to grow.

For me, there were three key takeaways from the event.

We’re seeing overwhelming support from our customers.
Not only did we have an opportunity to host our Hong Kong clientele, but many also traveled from cities in Greater China to be a part of this milestone. It was immensely gratifying to see them being vocal advocates of SoftLayer services. Natali Ardianto from Tiket.com, Chris Chun from 6waves and Larry Zhang representing ePRO all shared their brilliant stories with the audience.

Tiket.com’s co-founder, Natali, is especially proud of the fact that the company sold out 6,000 tickets for the K-Pop Big Bang Alive concert in 10 minutes, while their competitor’s site was unable to meet the huge demand and shut down for four hours during the peak period. Tiket.com, founded in 2011, faced TCP, DoS and DDoS attacks and tried hosting unsuccessfully on two different IaaS providers before moving to SoftLayer’s infrastructure services in 2012.

6Waves, a gaming publisher, was started in 2008. Today, built on SoftLayer, 6waves has grown to the #1 third-party publisher on Facebook. 6waves manages 14 million monthly active users and 2 million daily active users. Chris, 6waves’ CTO and co-founder, shared that since 2009 6waves has launched more than 200 games on SoftLayer.

Larry Zhang, ePRO’s senior IT manager and architect, had a similar story to share. The B2C e-commerce platform, part of China-based DX Holdings, supports more than 200,000 items in 15 categories and saw a 66 percent increase in customers from October 2011 to September 2013. ePRO is now looking to cater to the US and Australian markets, and Larry believes that SoftLayer’s aggressive expansion plans will help them meet their goal.

SoftLayer in Hong Kong

There is a vested interest in the SoftLayer-IBM integration roadmap.
Large enterprises are moving towards the cloud. This is not a forward-looking statement, it's a fact. And from the feedback gathered and the questions put up by these organizations, it is clear that they are investing in leveraging cloud services for improving their internal processes and for bringing services to their end customers more quickly. Lance Crosby presented a SoftLayer-IBM integration roadmap. With SoftLayer forming the foundation of IBM's cloud offerings—SaaS, PaaS and BPaaS—there is no doubt that we are as invested in this partnership as our clientele.

The strong startup community in Hong Kong is committed to growing with Softlayer.
Catalyst, SoftLayer's startup incubator, has always had a strong presence in Hong Kong, and the startup spirit was evident on March 17 as well. The dedicated roundtable conducted for the community with Lance Crosby and Casey Lau, SoftLayer's Catalyst representative for APAC, was the highlight of the day. Lance left us with a powerful thought, "We are here to be an extension to your infrastructure... The question is what can you build on us."

All in all, this was a great start to our new journey!

- Namrata

March 7, 2014

Why the Cloud Scares Traditional IT

My background is "traditional IT." I've been architecting and promoting enterprise virtualization solutions since 2002, and over the past few years, public and hybrid cloud solutions have become a serious topic of discussion ... and in many cases, contention. The customers who gasped with excitement when VMware rolled out a new feature for their on-premises virtualized environments would dismiss any recommendations of taking a public cloud or a hybrid cloud approach. Off-premises cloud environments were surrounded by marketing hype, and the IT departments considering them had legitimate concerns, especially around security and compliance.

I completely understood their concerns, and until recently, I often agreed with them. The cloud model is intimidating. If you've had control over every aspect of your IT environment for a few decades, you don't want to give up access to your infrastructure, much less have to trust another company to protect your business-critical information. But now, I think about those concerns as the start of a conversation about cloud, rather than a "no-go" zone. The cloud is different, but a company's approach to it should still be the same.

What do I mean by that? Enterprise developers and engineers still have to serve as architects to determine the functional and operational requirements for their services. In that process, they need to determine the suitability of a given platform for the computing workload and the company's business objectives and core competencies. Unfortunately, many of the IT decision-makers don't consider the bigger business context, and they choose to build their own "public" IaaS offerings to accommodate internal workloads, and in many cases, their own external clients.

This approach might makes sense for service providers, integrators and telcos because infrastructure resources are core components of their businesses, but I've seen the same thing happen at financial institutions, rental companies, and even an airline. Over time, internal IT departments carved out infrastructure-services revenue streams that are totally unrelated to the company's core business. The success of enterprise virtualization often empowered IT departments through cost savings and automation — making the promise of delivering public cloud “in-house” a natural extension and seemingly attractive proposition. Reshaping their perspectives around information security and compliance in that way is often a functional approach, but is it money well spent?

Instead of spending hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars in capital to build out (often commoditized) infrastructure, these businesses could be investing those resources in developing and marketing their core business areas. To give you an example of how a traditional IT task is performed in the cloud, I can share my experience from when I first accessed my SoftLayer account: I deployed a physical ESX host alongside a virtual compute instance, fully pre-configured with OS and vCenter, and I connected it via VPN to my existing (on-prem) vCenter environment. In the old model, that process would have probably taken a couple of days to complete, and I got it done in 3 hours.

Now more than ever, it is the responsibility of the core business line to validate internal IT strategies and evaluate alternatives. Public cloud is not always the right answer for all workloads, but driven by the rapidly evolving maturity and proliferation of IaaS, PaaS and SaaS offerings, most organizations will see significant benefits from it. Ultimately, the best way to understand the potential value is just to give it a try.

-Andy

Andreas Groth is an IBM worldwide channel solutions architect, focusing primarily on SoftLayer. Follow him on Twitter: @andreasgroth

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