Softlayer Posts

January 17, 2014

What's Next? $1.2 Billion Investment. 15 New Data Centers.

SoftLayer was founded in a living room on May 5, 2005. We bootstrapped our vision of becoming the de facto platform for cloud computing by maxing out our credit cards and draining our savings accounts. Over the course of eight years, we built a unique global offering, and in the middle of last year, our long-term vision was validated (and supercharged) by IBM.

When I posted about IBM acquiring SoftLayer last June, I explained that becoming part of IBM "will enable us to continue doing what we've done since 2005, but on an even bigger scale and with greater opportunities." To give you an idea of what "bigger scale" and "greater opportunities" look like, I need only direct you to today's press release: IBM Commits $1.2 Billion to Expand Global Cloud Footprint.

IBM Cloud Investment

It took us the better part of a decade to build a worldwide network of 13 data centers. As part of IBM, we'll more than double our data center footprint in a fraction of that time. In 2006, we were making big moves when we built facilities on the East and West coasts of the United States. Now, we're expanding into places like China, Hong Kong, London, Japan, India, Canada and Mexico City. We had a handful of founders pushing for SoftLayer's success, and now we've got 430,000+ IBM peers to help us reach our goal. This is a whole new ballgame.

The most important overarching story about this planned expansion is what each new facility will mean for our customers. When any cloud provider builds a data center in a new location, it's great news for customers and users in that geographic region: Content in that facility will be geographically closer to them, and they'll see lower pings and better performance from that data center. When SoftLayer builds a data center in a new location, customers and users in that geographic region see performance improvements from *all* of our data centers. The new facility serves as an on-ramp to our global network, so content on any server in any of our data centers can be accessed faster. To help illustrate that point, let's look at a specific example:

If you're in India, and you want to access content from a SoftLayer server in Singapore, you'll traverse the public Internet to reach our network, and the content will traverse the public Internet to get back to you. Third-party peering and transit providers pass the content to/from our network and your ISP, and you'll get the content you requested.

When we add a SoftLayer data center in India, you'll obviously access servers in that facility much more quickly, and when you want content from a server in our Singapore data center, you'll be routed through that new data center's network point of presence in India so that the long haul from India to Singapore will happen entirely on the private network we control and optimize.

Users around the world will have faster, more reliable access to servers in every other SoftLayer data center because we're bringing our network to their front doors. When you combine that kind connectivity and access with our unique hybrid offering of powerful bare metal servers and scalable virtual server instances, it's easy to see how IBM, the most powerful technology company of the last 100 years, is positioned to remain the most powerful technology company in the world for the next century.

Now it's time to get to work.

-@lavosby

December 16, 2013

Xplenty: Tech Partner Spotlight

We invite each of our featured SoftLayer Tech Marketplace Partners to contribute a guest post to the SoftLayer Blog, and this week, we're happy to welcome Yaniv Mor from Xplenty. Xplenty is a cloud-based code-free Hadoop as a Service platform that allows you to easily create data workflows, provision, monitor and scale clusters. Their goal is to eliminate the complexity of Hadoop to make it accessible and cost-effective for everyone.

Simplifying Hadoop

Apache Hadoop, open source software developed by Doug Cutting, is the most popular storage and processing platform for big data. Because Hadoop can accommodate structured data, semi-structured data, and unstructured data, it is the storage architecture of choice for some of the Internet's largest and most data-rich sites. Industry giants such as Google and Facebook have been using Hadoop for years to store and deliver information while gathering insights from customer behavior and internal business processes, and their obvious success with the platform has helped drive broad adoption and popularity all the way down to small-businesses and startups.

Specific use cases vary among industries, but similarities exist. Many companies leverage Hadoop to gather information about their clientele. With Hadoop, a company can process huge amounts of data to examine past and present behaviors, and with that information, customers can be presented personally-tailored recommendations, and the business can glean deep insights from the trends and outliers in its customer base. As a result, customers are more likely to make repeat purchases, and companies are able to predict trends and possible risks, allowing them to visualize and prepare for a number of business scenarios.

Another compelling use case for Hadoop is its ability to analyze and report on multi-faceted marketing and advertising campaigns. By drilling down into the guts of a campaign, users can see exactly what worked and what didn't. Marketers and advertisers can direct their resources to the campaigns that worked and let the ineffective ones fall by the wayside.

On the internal side, businesses are using Hadoop to better understand their own information. Data systems at financial companies use it to detect fraud anomalies by comparing transaction details. If you've ever made a credit card purchase in another state or country but the purchase didn't go through, your bank's system probably flagged the transaction for a representative to investigate. Other companies analyze data collected from their networks to monitor activity and diagnose bottlenecks and other issues with a negative impact.

The challenge with leveraging Hadoop's broad potential is that a company generally needs dedicated technical resources to allocate toward building and maintaining the solution — from manpower to financial to infrastructure. Hadoop is difficult to program and requires a very specific skill set that few possess. If a company doesn't have the personnel for the job, it will need to fork over some serious cash to get a system built and maintained. This can significantly hinder the progress of the data and business intelligence teams, and by default, the progress of the company. That's why we decided to create Xplenty.

Xplenty is a coding-free Hadoop-as-a-Service platform that allows data and BI users to process their big data stored on the SoftLayer cloud without having to acquire any special skills. What Xplenty does is remove the need to divert those precious resources from anything other than the business at hand. Xplenty's Hadoop-as-a-Service platform has a graphical user interface that enables the data and BI teams to build data flows without ever having to write a line of code. The benefit of this is twofold. First, the business intelligence analysts can quickly build data flows that would typically take weeks or more to program and debug, and data users can easily insert Xplenty into their data stack to handle processing needs. The second benefit is that since the IT department doesn't have to worry about doing any programming, they are able to tackle more pressing issues, bottlenecks are avoided, and life goes on without a hitch.

Xplenty was created specifically for the cloud, and SoftLayer is a major player in this space, so it was a natural fit for us to partner up to provide a SoftLayer-specific offering that will perform even better for customers already using SoftLayer infrastructure. We only work with providers with the best and most stable infrastructure, and SoftLayer is definitely at the top of the list.

If you want to try Hadoop on Xplenty, jump over to our SoftLayer sign up page, enter your details, and test drive the platform with a free 30-day trial!

- Yaniv Mor, Xplenty

This guest blog series highlights companies in SoftLayer's Technology Partners Marketplace.
These Partners have built their businesses on the SoftLayer Platform, and we're excited for them to tell their stories. New Partners will be added to the Marketplace each month, so stay tuned for many more come.
December 11, 2013

2013 at SoftLayer: Year in Review

I'm going into my third year at SoftLayer and it feels like "déjà vu all over again" to quote Yogi Berra. The breakneck pace of innovation, cloud adoption and market consolidation — it only seems to be accelerating.

The BIG NEWS for SoftLayer was announced in July when we became part of IBM. Plenty has already been written about the significance of this acquisition but as our CEO, Lance Crosby, eloquently put it in an earlier blog, "customers and clients from both companies will benefit from a higher level of choice and a higher level of service from a single partner. More important, the real significance will come as we merge technology that we developed within the SoftLayer platform with the power and vision that drives SmartCloud and pioneer next-generation cloud services."

We view our acquisition as an interesting inflection point for the entire cloud computing industry. The acquisition has ramifications that go beyond IaaS market and include both PaaS and SaaS offerings. As the foundation for IBM's SmartCloud offerings, the one-stop-shop for an entire portfolio of cloud services will resonate for startups and large enterprises alike. We're also seeing a market that is rapidly consolidating and only those with global reach, deep pockets, and an established customer base will survive.

With IBM's support and resources, SoftLayer's plans for customer growth and geographic expansion have hit the fast track. News outlets are already abuzz with our plans to open a new data center facility in Hong Kong in the first quarter of next year, and that's just the tip of the iceberg for our extremely ambitious 2014 growth plans. Given the huge influx of opportunities our fellow IBMers are bringing to the table, we're going to be busy building data centers to stay one step ahead of customer demand.

The IBM acquisition generated enough news to devote an entire blog to, but because we've accomplished so much in 2013, I'd be remiss if I didn't create some space to highlight some of the other significant milestones we achieved this year. The primary reason SoftLayer was attractive to IBM in the first place was our history of innovation and technology development, and many of the product announcements and press releases we published this year tell that story.

Big Data and Analytics
Big data has been a key focus for SoftLayer in 2013. With the momentum we generated when we announced our partnership with MongoDB in December of 2012, we've been able to develop and roll out high-performance bare metal solution designers for Basho's Riak platfomr and Cloudera Hadoop. Server virtualization is a phenomenal boon to application servers, but disk-heavy, I/O-intensive operations can easily exhaust the resources of a virtualized environment. Because Riak and Hadoop are two of the most popular platforms for big data architectures, we teamed up with Basho and Cloudera to engineer server configurations that would streamline provisioning and supercharge the operations of their data-rich environments. From the newsroom in 2013:

  • SoftLayer announced the availability of Riak and Riak Enterprise on SoftLayer's IaaS platform. This partnership with Basho gives users the availability, fault tolerance, operational simplicity, and scalability of Riak combined with the flexibility, performance, and agility of SoftLayer's on-demand infrastructure.
  • SoftLayer announced a partnership with Cloudera to provide Hadoop big data solutions in a bare metal cloud environment. These on-demand solutions were designed with Cloudera best practices and are rapidly deployed with SoftLayer's easy-to-use solution designer tool.

Cutting-Edge Customers
Beyond the pure cloud innovation milestones we've hit this year, we've also seen a few key customers in vertical markets do their own innovating on our platform. These companies run the gamut from next generation e-commerce to interactive marketers and game developers who require high performance cloud infrastructure to build and scale the next leading application or game. Some of these game developers and cutting-edge tech companies are pretty amazing and we're glad we tapped into them to tell our story:

  • Asia's hottest tech companies looking to expand their reach globally are relying on SoftLayer's cloud infrastructure to break into new markets. Companies such as Distil Networks, Tiket.com, Simpli.fi, and 6waves are leveraging SoftLayer's Singapore data center to build out their customer base while enabling them to deliver their application or game to users across the region with extremely low latency.
  • In March, we announced that hundreds of the top mobile, PC and social games with more than 100 million active players, are now supported on SoftLayer's infrastructure platform. Gaming companies -- including Hothead Games, Geewa, Grinding Gear Games, Peak Games and Rumble Entertainment -- are flocking to SoftLayer because they can roll out virtual and bare-metal servers along with a suite of networking, security and storage solutions on demand and in real time.

Industry Recognition
SoftLayer's success and growth is a collective effort, however, it is nice to see our founder and CEO, Lance Crosby get some well-deserved recognition. In August, the Metroplex Technology Business Council (MTBC), the largest technology trade association in Texas, named him the winner of its Corporate CEO of the Year during the 13th Annual Tech Titans Awards ceremony.

The prestigious annual contest recognizes outstanding information technology companies and individuals in the North Texas area who have made significant contributions during the past year locally, as well as to the technology industry overall.

We're using the momentum we've continued building in 2013 to propel us into 2014. An upcoming milestone, just around the corner, will be our participation at Pulse 2014 in late February. At this conference we plan to unveil the ongoing integration efforts taking place between SoftLayer and IBM including how;

  • SoftLayer provides flexible, secure, cloud-based infrastructure for running the toughest and most mission critical workloads on the cloud;
  • SoftLayer is the foundation of IBM PaaS offerings for cloud-native application development and deployment;
  • SoftLayer is the platform for many of IBM SaaS offerings supporting mobile, social and analytic applications. IBM has a growing portfolio of roughly 110 SaaS applications.

Joining forces with IBM will have its challenges but the opportunities ahead looks amazing. We encourage you to watch this space for even more activity next year and join us at Pulse 2014 in Las Vegas.

-Andre

December 5, 2013

How to Report Abuse to SoftLayer

When you find hosted content that doesn't meet our acceptable use policy or another kind of inappropriate Internet activity originating from a SoftLayer service, your natural reaction might be to assume, "SoftLayer must know about it, and the fact that it's going on suggests that they're allowing that behavior." I know this because every now and then, I come across a "@SoftLayer is phishing my email. #spamming #fail" Tweet or a "How about u stop hacking my computer???" Facebook post. It's easy to see where these users are coming from, so my goal for this post is to provide the background you need to understand how behavior we don't condone — what we consider "abuse" of our services — might occur on our platform and what we do when we learn about it.

The most common types of abuse reported from the SoftLayer network are spam, copyright/trademark infringement, phishing and abusive traffic (DDoS attacks). All four are handled by the same abuse team, but they're all handled a bit differently, so it's important to break them down to understand the most efficient way to report them to our team. When you're on the receiving end of abuse, all you want is to make it stop. In the hurry to report the abusive behavior, it's easy to leave out some of the key information we need to address your concern, so let's take a look at each type of abuse and the best ways to report it to the SoftLayer team:

If You Get Spam

Spam is the most common type of abuse that gets reported to SoftLayer. Spam email is unsolicited, indiscriminate bulk messaging that is sent to you without your explicit consent. If you open your email client right now, your junk mail folder probably has a few examples of spam ... Someone is trying to sell you discount drugs or arrange a multi-million dollar inheritance transfer. In many ways, it's great that email is so easy to use and pervasive to our daily lives, but that ease of use also makes it an easy medium for spammers to abuse. Whether the spammer is a direct SoftLayer customer or a customer of one of our customers or somewhere further down the line of customers of customers, spam messages sent from a SoftLayer server will point back to us, and our abuse team is the group that will help stop it.

When you receive spam sent through SoftLayer, you should forward it directly to our abuse team (abuse@softlayer.com). Our team needs a full copy of the email with its headers intact. If you're not sure what that means, check out these instructions on how to retrieve your email headers. The email headers help tell the story about where exactly the messages are coming from and which customer we need to contact to stop the abuse.

If You See Phishing

Phishing abuse might be encountered via spam or you might encounter it on a website. Phishing is best described as someone masquerading as someone else to get your sensitive information, and it's one of the most serious issues our abuse team faces. Every second that a phishing/scam site is online, another user might be fooled into giving up his or her credit card or login information, and we don't want that to happen. Often, the fact that a site is not legitimate is clear relatively quickly, but as defenses against phishing have gotten better, so have the phishing sites. Take a minute to go through this phishing IQ test to get an idea of how difficult phishing can be to trace.

When it comes to reporting phishing, you should send the site's URL to the abuse team (also using abuse@softlayer.com). If you came across the phishing site via a spam email, be sure to include the email headers with your message. To help us filter the phishing complaint, please make sure to include the word "phishing" in your email's subject line. Our team will immediately investigate and follow up with the infringing customer internally.

If You Find Copyright or Trademark Infringement

If infringement of your copyright or trademark is happening on our platform, we want to know about it so we can have it taken down immediately. Copyright complaints and trademark complaints are handled slightly differently, so let's look at each type to better understand how they work.

Complaints of copyright infringement are processed by our abuse team based on the strict DMCA complaint laws. When I say "strict" in that sentence, I'm not saying it lightly ... Because DMCA complaints are legal issues, every requirement in the DMCA must be met in order for our team to act on the complaint. That might seem arbitrary, but we're not given much leeway when it comes to the DMCA process, and we have to be sticklers.

On our DMCA legal page, we outline the process of reporting a DMCA complaint of copyright infringement (primarily citing the statute 17 U.S.C. Section 512(c)(3)). If you don't completely understand what needs to be included in the claim, we recommend that you seek independent legal advice. It sounds harsh, but failure to submit copyright infringement notification as described above will result in no legal notice or action on behalf of SoftLayer. When you've made sure all required evidence has been included in your DMCA complaint, make sure "copyright" or "DMCA" are included in your subject line and submit the complaint to copyright@softlayer.com.

Trademark complaints do not have the same requirements as copyright complaints, but the more information you can provide in your complaint, the easier it will be for our customer to locate and remove the offending material. If you encounter unauthorized use of your registered trademark on our network, please email copyright@softlayer.com with details — the exact location of the infringing content, your trademark registration information, etc. — along with an explanation that this trademark usage is unauthorized and should be removed. In your email, please add the word "trademark" to the subject line to help us filter and prioritize your complaint.

If You See Abusive Traffic

Spam, phishing and copyright infringement are relatively straightforward when it comes to finding and reporting abuse, but sometimes the abuse isn't as visible and tangible (though the effect usually is). If a SoftLayer server is sending abusive traffic to your site, we want to know about it as quickly as possible. Whether that behavior is part of a Denial of Service (DoS) attack or is just scanning ports to possibly attack later, it's important that you give us details so we can prevent any further activity.

To report this type of abuse, send a snippet from your log file including at least 10 lines of logs that show attempts to break into or overload your server. Here's a quick reference to where you can find the relevant logs to send:

  • Email Spam - Send Mail Logs:
    • /var/log/maillog
    • /usr/local/psa/var/log/maillog
  • Brute Force Attacks - Send SSH Logs:
    • /var/log/messages
    • /var/log/secure

Like spam and phishing reports, abusive traffic complaints should be sent to abuse@softlayer.com with a quick explanation of what is happening and any other details you can provide. When you submit a complaint about abusive traffic, make sure your message's subject line reflects the type of issue ("DDoS attack," "brute force attempts," etc.) so our team can investigate your report even quicker.

As I mentioned at the start of this post, these are just four types of abusive behavior that our abuse department addresses on a daily basis. Our Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) outlines what can and cannot be hosted using SoftLayer services, and the process of reporting other types of abuse is generally the same as what you see in the four examples I mentioned above ... Send a clear, concise report to abuse@softlayer.com with key words about the type of violation in the message's subject line. When our team is able to look into your complaint and find the evidence they need to take action, they do so quickly.

I can't wrap up this blog of tips without mentioning the "Tips from the Abuse Department" blog Jennifer Groves wrote about reporting abuse ... It touches on some of the same ideas as this post, and it also provides a little more perspective from behind the lines of the abuse department. As the social media gal, I don't handle abuse on a day-to-day basis, but I do help people dealing with abuse issues, and I know a simple guide like this will be of value.

If an abuse-related issue persists and you don't feel like anything has been fixed, double-check that you've included all the necessary information and evidence in your correspondence to the abuse team. In most cases, you will not receive a response from the abuse team, but that doesn't mean they aren't taking action. The abuse@ and copyright@ email aliases function as notification systems for our abuse teams, and they correspond with the infringing customers internally when a complaint is submitted. Given the fact that hundreds of users may report the same abusive behavior at the same time, responding directly to each message would slow down the process of actually resolving the issue (which is the priority).

If everything was included in your initial correspondence with the abuse team but you still don't notice a change in the abusive behavior, you can always follow up with our social media team at twitter@softlayer.com, and we'll do everything we can to help.

-Rachel

November 19, 2013

Protect Your Data: Configure EVault for Server Backups

In "The Tenth Anniversary" episode of "Everybody Loves Raymond," Raymond accidentally records the Super Bowl over his wedding video. He hilariously tries to compensate for his gaffe by renewing his wedding vows so he can make a new tape for his wife Debra. If life imitates art, it's worth considering what would happen if that tape held your business data. It would be disaster!

While it's unlikely that one of your sysadmins will accidentally record the Super Bowl over the data in your database server cluster, data loss can occur in a number of ways. If your business data is not protected and backed up, it's unlikely that you'll have a neat and tidy sitcom episode resolution. Luckily, SoftLayer provides simple, inexpensive backup capabilities with software such as EVault, so you shouldn't ever be worried about anyone pulling a Raymond on your data.

The following quick, four-step process walks you through how to protect and back up your data by subscribing to SoftLayer's EVault Backup client. This software enables you to design and set your backup schedule, protecting your business from unexpected costs because of accidental deletions, viruses, and other disasters. To follow along on your own servers, your computing instances or bare metal servers need to be provisioned, and you need to have root or administrator level access to those servers. For the sake of brevity, I'll be using a Linux operating system in this guide, but if you're running Windows, the process, in general, is no different.

Step 1 - Order EVault Backup for the server or computing instance

  1. Log into the SoftLayer Customer Portal and select the server(s) that needs storage services from the device list.
  2. Scroll down to the Storage section. Select the Add (or Modify) link located on the right hand corner of the EVault record to place an order for an EVault Backup client subscription.
  3. On the EVault ordering screen, select either Local or Remote Data Center and the desired amount of storage. Agree to the terms and conditions and click the Order EVault button to place your EVault storage order.
  4. The order is typically provisioned in 5 minutes or less and the system creates a user and password for the new instance of EVault.
  5. Click Services→Storage→EVault and expand the EVAULT link to make note of the user credentials, which will be used in Step 3.

Step 2 - Download the EVault agent on the server or computing instance

  1. SSH into the server or computing instance and run the following command:
    # wget –N http://downloads.service.softlayer.com/evault/evault_manual.sh

Step 3 - Register the server or computing instance with EVault in order to run back up and restore jobs

  1. From the command prompt on the server or compute instance run the following command to register it with EVault:
    ~]# sh ./evault_manual.sh
  2. In the ensuing prompts, enter the credentials that were noted Step 1.5 and use ev-webcc01.service.softlayer.com for the web-based agent console address.

    Note: In the event the agent fails to register with EVault, you can quickly register the agent manually by running ~]#<Installation directory>/register

Once you've made it to this point, you're ready to run backup and restore jobs.

Step 4 – Login into EVault console with WebCCLogin

  1. From the SoftLayer Customer Portal, click Services→Storage→EVault.
  2. Expand the server or compute instance to which EVault Backup is attached. In the right-hand corner of the server entry you will find a link to WebCCLogin.
  3. Click the WebCCLogin link for the EVault Web CentralControl screen. Type in the credentials from Step 1.5 and you’ll be taken to the EVault Backup and Restore interface.
  4. You are now ready to run your backup and restore jobs!

Check your backups often to confirm that they're being created when, where, and how you want them to be created. To prepare for any possible disaster recovery scenarios, schedule periodic tests of your backups: Restore the most recent backup of your production server to an internal server. That way, if someone pulls a Raymond on your server(s), you'll be able to get all of your data back online quickly. If you're interested in learning more, visit the Evault Backup page on KnowledgeLayer.

-Vinayak Harnoor

Vinayak Harnoor is a Technical Architect with the IBM Global Technology Services (GTS) Global Cloud Ecosystem team.

November 1, 2013

Paving the Way for the DevOps Revolution

The traditional approach to software development has been very linear: Your development team codes a release and sends it over to a team of quality engineers to be tested. When everything looks good, the code gets passed over to IT operations to be released into production. Each of these teams operates within its own silo and makes changes independent of the other groups, and at any point in the process, it's possible a release can get kicked back to the starting line. With the meteoric rise of agile development — a development philosophy geared toward iterative and incremental code releases — that old waterfall-type development approach is being abandoned in favor of a DevOps approach.

DevOps — a fully integrated development and operations approach — streamlines the software development process in an agile development environment by consolidating development, testing and release responsibilities into one cohesive team. This way, ideas, features and other developments can be released very quickly and iteratively to respond to changing and growing market needs, avoiding the delays of long, drawn-out and timed dev releases.

To help you visualize the difference between the traditional approach and the DevOps approach, take a look at these two pictures:

Traditional Waterfall Development
SoftLayer DevOps Blog

DevOps
SoftLayer DevOps Blog

Unfortunately, many businesses struggle to adopt the DevOps approach because they simply update their org chart by merging their traditional teams, but their development philosophy doesn't change at the same time. As a result, I've encountered a lot of companies who have been jaded by previous attempts to move to a DevOps model, and I'm not alone. There is a significant need in the marketplace for some good old fashioned DevOps expertise.

A couple months ago, my friend Raj Bhargava pinged me with a phenomenal idea to put on a DevOps "un-conference" in Boulder, Colorado, to address the obvious need he's observed for DevOps education and best practices. Raj is a serial, multiple-exit entrepreneur from Boulder, and he is the co-founder and CEO of a DevOps-focused startup there called JumpCloud. When he asked if I would like to co-chair the event and have SoftLayer as a headline sponsor alongside JumpCloud, the answer was a quick and easy "Yes!"

Sure, there have been other DevOps-related conferences around the world, but ours was designed to be different from the outset. As strange as it may sound, half of the conference intentionally occurred outside of the conference: One of our highest priorities was to strike up conversations between the participants before, during and after the event. If we're putting on a conference to encourage a collaborative development approach, it would be counterproductive for us to use a top-down, linear approach to engaging the attendees, right?

I'm happy to report that this inaugural attempt of our untested concept was an amazing success. We kept the event private for our first run at the concept, but the event was bursting at the seams with brilliant developers and tech influencers. Brad Feld and our friends from the Foundry Group invited all of their portfolio CEO's and CTO's. David Cohen, co-founder of Techstars and head honcho at Bullet Time Ventures did the same. JumpCloud and SoftLayer helped round out the attendee list with a few of our most innovative partners as well as a few of technologists from within our own organizations. It was an incredible mix of super-smart tech pros, business leaders and VC's from all over the world.

With such a diverse group of attendees, the conversations at the event were engaging, energizing and profound. We discussed everything from how startups should incorporate automation into their business plans at the outset to how the practice of DevOps evolves as companies scale quickly. At the end of the day, we brought all of those theoretical discussions back down to the ground by sharing case studies of real companies that have had unbelievable success in incorporating DevOps into their businesses. I had the honor of wrapping up the event as moderator of a panel with Jon Prall from Sendgrid, Scott Engstrom from Gnip and Richard Miller of Mocavo, and I couldn't have been happier with the response.

I'd like to send a big thanks to everyone who participated, especially our cosponsors — JumpCloud, VictorOps, Authentic8, DH Capital, SendGrid, Cooley, Pivot Desk, SVP and Pantheon.

I'm looking forward to opening this up to the world next year!

-@PaulFord

October 24, 2013

Why Hybrid? Why Now?

As off-premise cloud computing adoption continues to grow in a non-linear fashion, a growing number of businesses running in-house IT environments are debating whether they should get on board as well. If you've been part of any of those conversations, you've tried to balance the hype with the most significant questions for your business: "How do we know if our company is ready to try cloud resources? And if we're ready, how do we actually get started?"

Your company is cloud-ready as soon as you understand and accept the ramifications of remote resources and scaling in the cloud model, and it doesn't have to be an "all-in" decision. If you need certain pieces of your infrastructure to reside in-house, you can start evaluating the cloud with workloads that don't have to be hosted internally. The traditional IT term for this approach is "hybrid," but that term might cause confusion these days.

In the simplest sense, a hybrid model is one in which a workload is handled by one or more non-heterogeneous elements. In the traditional IT sense, those non-heterogeneous elements are two distinct operating environments (on-prem and off-prem). In SoftLayer's world, a hybrid environment leverages different heterogeneous elements: Bare metal and virtual server instances, delivered in the cloud.

Figure 1: Traditional Hybrid - On-Premise to Cloud (Through VPN, SSL or Open Communications)

Traditional Hybrid

Figure 2: SoftLayer's Hybrid - Dedicated + Virtual

SoftLayer Hybrid

Because SoftLayer's "hybrid" and traditional IT's "hybrid" are so different, it's easy to understand the confusion in the marketplace: If a hybrid environment is generally understood to involve the connection of on-premise infrastructure to cloud resources, SoftLayer's definition seems contrarian. Actually, the use of the term is a lot more similar than I expected. In a traditional hosting environment, most businesses think in terms of bare metal (dedicated) servers, and when those businesses move "to the cloud," they're generally thinking in terms of virtualized server instances. So SoftLayer's definition of a hybrid environment is very consistent with the market definition ... It's just all hosted off-premise.

The ability to have dedicated resources intermixed with virtual resources means that workloads from on-premise hypervisors that require native or near-native performance can be moved immediately. And because those workloads don't have to be powered by in-house servers, a company's IT infrastructure moves a CapEx to an OpEx model. In the past, adopting infrastructure as a service (IaaS) involved shoehorning workloads into whichever virtual resource closest matched an existing environment, but those days are gone. Now, on-premise resources can be replicated (and upgraded) on demand in a single off-premise environment, leveraging a mix of virtual and dedicated resources.

SoftLayer's environment simplifies the process for businesses looking to move IT infrastructure off-premise. Those businesses can start by leveraging virtual server instances in a cloud environment while maintaining the in-house resources for certain workloads, and when those in-house resources reach the end of their usable life (or need an upgrade), the businesses can shift those workloads onto bare metal servers in the same cloud environment as their virtual server instances.

The real-world applications are pretty obvious: Your company is considering moving part of a workload to cloud in order to handle peak season loads at the end of the year. You've contemplated transitioning parts of your environment to the cloud, but you've convinced yourself that shared resource pools are too inefficient and full of noisy neighbor problems, so you'd never be able to move your core infrastructure to the same environment. Furthering the dilemma, you have to capitalize on the assets you already have that are still of use to the company.

You finally have the flexibility to slowly transition your environment to a scalable, flexible cloud environment without sacrificing. While the initial setup phases for a hybrid environment may seem arduous, Rome wasn't built in a day, so you shouldn't feel pressure to rush the construction of your IT environment. Here are a few key points to consider when adopting a hybrid model that will make life easier:

  • Keep it simple. Don't overcomplicate your environment. Keep networks, topologies and methodologies simple, and they'll be much more manageable and scalable.
  • Keep it secure. Simple, robust security principles will reduce your deployment timeframe and reduce attack points.
  • Keep it sane. Hybrid mixes the best of both worlds, so chose the best assets to move over. "Best" does not necessarily mean "easiest" or "cheapest" workload, but it doesn't exclude those workloads either.

With this in mind, you're ready to take on a hybrid approach for your infrastructure. There's no certification for when your company finally becomes a "cloud company." The moment you start leveraging off-premise resources, you've got a hybrid environment, and you can adjust your mix of on-premise, off-premise, virtual and bare metal resources as your business needs change and evolve.

-Jeff Klink

Jeff Klink is a senior technical staff member (STSM) with IBM Canada.

October 16, 2013

Tips and Tricks: Troubleshooting Email Issues

Working in support, one of the most common issues we troubleshoot is a customer's ability to receive email. Depending on email server, this can be a headache and a half to figure out, but more often than not, we're able to fix the problem with one of only a few simple solutions. Because the SoftLayer Blog audience loves technical tips and tricks, I thought I'd share a few easy steps that make pinpointing the root cause of email issues much easier.

Before you gear up to go into battle, check the that server is not out of disk space on /var and that it is not in a read only state. That precursory step may seem silly, but Occam's Razor often holds true in technical troubleshooting. Once you verify that those two common problems aren't causing your email problems, the next step is to determine whether the email issues are server-wide or isolated to one mail account/domain. To do that, the first thing you need to do is make sure that the IMAP and POP services are responding.

Check IMAP and POP Services

The universal approach to checking IMAP and POP services is to use telnet:

telnet <serverip> 110
telnet <serverip> 143

If either of those commands fail, you're able to pinpoint which service to check on your server.

For most variants of Linux, you can check both services with a single command: netstat -plan|egrep -i "110|143". The resulting output will show if the services are listening and which process is doing the listening. In Windows, you can run a similar command from a command prompt: netstat -anb|find "LISTEN"| findstr "110 143".

If the ports are listening, and you're able to connect to them over telnet, your next stop should be your server's error logs.

Check Error Logs

You want to look for any mail errors that might clue you into the root cause of your email issues. In Linux, you can check /var/log/maillog, and in Windows, you can filter eventvwr.msc for mail only. If there are errors, a simple search will highlight them quickly.

If there are no errors, it's time to dig into the mail queue directly.

Check the Mail Queue

Depending on the mail server you use, the commands here are going to vary. Here are a few examples of how we'd investigate the most common mail servers we encounter:

QMail

Display the mail queue: /var/qmail/bin/qmail-qread
Display the number of messages in the queue: /var/qmail/bin/qmail-qstat
Reference article: Gaining Control Over the QMail Queue

Sendmail

Display the mail queue: sendmail -bp or mailq
Display the number of messages in the queue: mailq –OmaxQueueRunSize=1
Reference article: Quick Sendmail Cheatsheet

Exim

Display the mail queue: exim -bp
Display the number of messages in the queue: exim -bpc
Reference article: Exim cheatsheet

MailEnable

MailEnable users can can check to see that messages are moving by opening the mail directory:
Program Files\MailEnable\Queues\SMTP\Inbound\Messages
Reference article: How to diagnose inbound message delivery delays

With these commands, you can filter through the email queues to see whether any of them are for the users or domains you're having problems with. If nothing obvious presents itself at that point, it's time for some active testing.

Active Testing

Send an email to your mailserver from an external mailserver (anything will do as long as it's not on the same server). Watch for logging of the email as it's delivered:
tail -f maillog
On busy mailservers you might add |grep youremailid or simply look for a new message in the directory where the email will be stored.

The your primary goal in troubleshooting your email issues in this way is to isolate the root cause of your problem so that you can fix it more quickly. SoftLayer customers have direct access to our support team to help you through this process, but it's always nice to keep a quick reference like this in your back pocket to be able to pinpoint the problem yourself.

-Bill

October 14, 2013

Product Spotlight: Vyatta Network Gateway Appliance

In the wake of our recent Vyatta network gateway appliance product launch, I thought I'd address some of the most common questions customers have asked me about the new offering. With inquiries spanning the spectrum from broad and general to detailed and specific, I might not be able to cover everything in this blog post, but at the very least, it should give a little more context for our new network gateway offering.

To begin, let's explore the simplest question I've been asked: "What is a network gateway?" A network gateway provides tools to manage traffic into and out of one or more VLANs (Virtual Local Area Networks). The network gateway serves a customer-configurable routing device that sits in front of designated VLANs. The servers in those VLANs route through the network gateway appliance as their first hop instead of Front-end Customer Routers (FCR) or Back-end Customer Routers (BCR). From an infrastructure perspective, SoftLayer's network gateway offering consists of a single server, and in the future, the offering will be expanded to multi-server configurations to support high availability needs and larger clustered configurations.

The general function of a network gateway may seem a little abstract, so let's look at a couple real world use cases to see how you can put that functionality to work in your own cloud environment.

Example 1: Complex Traffic Management
You have a multi-server cloud environment and a complex set of firewall rules that allow certain types of traffic to certain servers from specific addresses. Without a network gateway, you would need to configure multiple hardware and software firewalls throughout your topology and maintain multiple rules sets, but with the network gateway appliance, you streamline your configuration into a single point of control on both the public and private networks.

After you order a gateway appliance in the SoftLayer portal and configure which VLANs route through the appliance, the process of configuring the device is simple: You define your production, development and QA environments with distinct traffic rules, and the network gateway handles the traffic segmentation. If you wanted to create your own VPN to connect your hosted environment to your office or in-house data center, that configuration is quick and easy as well. The high-touch challenge of managing several sets of network rules across multiple devices is simplified and streamlined.

Example 2: Creating a Static NAT
You want to create a static NAT (Network Address Translation) so that you can direct traffic through a public IP address to an internal IP address. With the IPv4 address pool dwindling and new allocations being harder to come by, this configuration is becoming extremely popular to accommodate users who can't yet reach IPv6 addresses. This challenge would normally require a significant level of effort of even the most seasoned systems administrator, but with the gateway appliance, it's a painless process.

In addition to the IPv4 address-saving benefits, your static NAT adds a layer of protection for your internal web servers from the public network, and as we discussed in the first example, your gateway device also serves as a single configuration point for both inbound and outbound firewall rules.

If you have complex network-related needs, and you want granular control of the traffic to and from your servers, a gateway appliance might be the perfect tool for you. You get the control you want and save yourself a significant amount of time and effort configuring and tweaking your environment on-the-fly. You can terminate IPSec VPN tunnels, execute your own network address translation, and run diagnostic commands such as traffic monitoring (tcpdump) on your global environment. And in addition to that, your gateway serves as a single point of contact to configure sophisticated firewall rules!

If you want to learn more about the gateway appliance, check out KnowledgeLayer or contact our friendly sales team directly with your questions: sales@softlayer.com

-Ben

October 3, 2013

Improving Communications for Customer-Affecting Events

Service disruptions are never a good thing. Though SoftLayer invests extensively in design, equipment, and personnel training to reduce the risk of disruptions to our customers, in the technology world there are times where scheduled events or unplanned incidents are inevitable. During those times, we understand that restoring service is top priority, and almost as important is communicating to customers regarding the cause of the incident and the current status of our work to resolve it.

To date we've used a combination of tickets, emails, forum posts, portal "yellow" notifications, as well as RSS and Twitter feeds to provide status updates during service-affecting events. Many of these methods require customers to "come and get it," so we've been working on a more targeted, proactive approach to disseminating information.

I'm excited to report that our Development and Operations teams have collaborated on new functionality in the SoftLayer portal that will improve the way we share information with customers about unplanned infrastructure troubles or upcoming planned maintenances. With our new Event Communications toolset, we're able to pinpoint the accounts affected by an event and update users who opt-in to receive notifications about how these events may impact their services.

Notifications

As the development work is finalized, we plan to roll out a few phases of improvements. The first phase of implementation, which is ready today, enables email alerts for unplanned incidents, and any portal user account can opt-in to receive them. These emails provide details about the impact and current status of an unplanned incident in progress (UIP). In this phase, notifications can be sent for devices such as physical servers, CCIs and shared SLB VIPs, and we will be adding additional services over time.

In future phases of this project, we plan to include:

  • A new "Event" section of the Customer Portal which will allow customers to browse upcoming scheduled maintenances or current/recent unplanned incidents which may impact their services. In the past, we generated tickets for scheduled maintenances, so separating these event notifications will improve customer visibility.
  • Enhanced visibility for events in our mobile apps (phone/tablet).
  • Updates to affected services for a given event as customers add / change services.
  • Notification of newly added or newly updated events that have not been read by the user (similar email "inbox" functionality) in the portal.
  • Identification of any related current or recent events as a customer begins to open a ticket in the portal.
  • Reminders of upcoming scheduled maintenances along with progress updates to the event notification throughout the maintenance in some cases.
  • Improved ability to correlate specific incidents to customer service troubles.
  • Dissemination of RFO (reason-for-outage) statements to customers following a post-incident review of an unplanned service disruption.

Since we respect our customers' inboxes, these notifications will only be sent to user accounts that have opted in. If you'd like to receive them, simply log into the Customer Portal and navigate to "Notification Subscriptions" under the "Administration" menu (direct link). From that page, individual users can control event subscriptions, and portal logins that have administrative control over multiple users on the account can control the opt-in for themselves and their downstream users. For a more detailed walkthrough of the opt-in process, visit the KnowledgeLayer: "Update Subscription Settings for the Event Management System"

The Network Operations Center has already begun using this customer notification toolset for customer-affecting events, so we recommend that you opt-in as soon as possible to benefit from this new functionality.

-Dani

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