Posts Tagged 'Canada'

August 20, 2014

SoftLayer is in Canada, eh?

Last week, we celebrated the official launch of our Toronto (TOR01) data center—the fourth new SoftLayer data center to go live in 2014, and our first in Canada! To catch you up on our progress this year, we unveiled a data center in Hong Kong in June to provide regional redundancy in Asia. In July, we added similar redundancy in Europe with the grand opening of our London data center, and we cut the ribbon on a SoftLayer data center designed specifically for federal workloads in Richardson, TX. The new Toronto location joins our data center pods in Washington, D.C., as our second location in the northeast region of North America.

As you can imagine, our development and operations teams have been working around the clock to get these new facilities built, so they were fortunate to have Tim Hortons in Toronto to keep them going. Fueled by countless double-doubles and Timbits, they officially brought TOR01 online August 11! This data center launch is part of IBM’s massive $1.2 billion commitment to in expanding our global cloud footprint. A countless number of customers have asked us when we were going to open a facility in Canada, so we prioritized Toronto to meet that demand. And because the queue had been building for so long, as soon as the doors were opened, we had a flood of new orders to fulfill. Many of these customers expressed a need for data residency in Canada to handle location-sensitive workloads, and expanding our private network into Canada means in the region will see even better network performance to SoftLayer facilities around the world.

Here are what a few of our customer had to say about the Toronto launch:

Brenda Crainic, CTO and co-founder of Maegan said, “We are very excited to see SoftLayer open a data center in Toronto, as we are now expanding our customer base in Canada. We are looking forward to host all our data in Canada, in addition to their easy-to-use services and great customer service."

Frederic Bastien, CEO at mnubo says, “We are very pleased to have a data center in Canada. Our customers value analytics performance, data residency and privacy, and deployment flexibility—and with SoftLayer we get all that and a lot more! SoftLayer is a great technology partner for our infrastructure needs.”

With our new data center, we’re able to handle Canadian infrastructure needs from A to Zed.

While we’d like to stick around and celebrate with a Molson Canadian or two, our teams are off to the next location to get it online and ready. Where will it be? You won’t have to wait very long to find out.

I’d like to welcome the new Canucks (both employees and customers) to SoftLayer. If you’re interested in getting started with a bare metal or virtual server in Canada, we’re running a limited-time launch promotion that’ll save up to $500 on your first order in Toronto: Order Now!

-John

P.S. I included a few Canadianisms in this post. If you need help deciphering them, check out this link.

February 20, 2013

Global Game Jam: Build a Video Game in 48 Hours

You're a conflicted zombie that yearns to be human again. Now you've got to dodge grandma and babies in an 8-bit side-scroller. Now you're Vimberly Koll, and you have to stop Poseidon from raining down on the Global Game Jam. At the end of Global Game Jam Vancouver, teams of developers, 3D artists, level designers and sound engineers conceptualized and created these games (along with a number of others) in less than 48 hours. Building a game in a weekend is no small task, so only the best and brightest game developers in the world converge on over 300 sites in 63 countries to show off their skills.

For the fifth annual Global Game Jam, more than 16,000 participants committed a weekend to learning from and collaborating with their peers in a worldwide game development hackathon. I was lucky enough to get to sit in on the action in Vancouver, and I thought I'd give you a glimpse into how participants make game development magic happen in such a short period of time.

Vancouver Global Game Jam

Day 1 (Friday Night): The Brainstorm
More than 260 participants poured into an open study area of the Life Sciences building at the Univerity of British Columbia to build the next best distraction ... er, video game. The event kicked off with a keynote from Brian Proviciano, a game development prodigy, who shared his history and offered sage advice for those interested in the industry. Following a comical 20-second idea pitch session, the caffeine began to flow and the brainstorm commenced.

Inspiration could come from anywhere, and a perfect example is the "Poseidon" game I mentioned above: GGJVancouver organizer Kimberly Voll had sprinklers rain on her office a few days prior to the event, so someone decided to make a game out of that situation. This year, the Global Game Jam introduced an interesting twist that they called "diversifiers." Diversifiers are side-challenges for extra credit, and two of my favorites were "Atari Age" — the game has to be smaller than 4kb — and "May the (Web) Force be With You" — the game has to run in a browser.

Fast-forward two hours, and as you look around, you see storyboards and scripts being written, characters being born, and a few intrepid developers starting to experiment with APIs, game engines , and external controllers to find some additional flair for their final products. You wouldn't expect a game made in 48 hours to incorporate an iOS Eye Tracking API or the Leap Motion gesture controller, but these developers are ambitious!

As the concepts are finalized, team members rotate in and out for sleep, and some even go home to get some rest — a good idea on the first night since everyone usually pulls an all-nighter on Saturday.

Vancouver Global Game Jam

Day 2 (Saturday): Laying the Foundation
It was cool to walk the aisles and peer over peoples' shoulders as musical scores, wrangled code and character models were coming together. However, the scene wasn't all smiles and hugs; a few groups were wrestling quirky bugs and integration issues, and in some cases, they ended up having to completely reboot their approach. Day 2 set the course for all of the teams. A few teams disbanded due to disagreements or unfixable bugs, and some developers peeled off from their teams to follow an untamed passion. In the Global Game Jam, there are no rules ... only games.

Vancouver Global Game Jam

Day 3 (Sunday): Sleep, What's That?
By Day 3, the building starts feeling like a college dorm during finals week when everyone is staying up all night to study or finish their comp-sci assignments (I know it wasn't just me...). Running on various vehicles of caffeine, teams worked heads-down all day to meet their 3pm deadline. Sighs of relief and high fives were exchanged when the games were submitted, and the event concluded with a pizza party and demo session where everyone could see and share the fruits of their labor.

Vancouver Global Game Jam

As I left the conference, teams were given the opportunity to showcase their games on the big screen to a chorus of laughter and applause. It was an awesome experience, and I'm glad SoftLayer sponsored it so that I could attend, take it all in and meet a ton of outstanding up-and-coming game developers. If you're into making games (or you've thought about it), check out the Global Game Jam one of these years.

Just don't forget to bring deodorant ... for your neighbor's sake.

-@andy_mui

Photo Credit Shout-Outs: Alex Larente, Ligia Brosch, Naz Madani. Great shots!

November 5, 2012

O Canada! - Catalyst, Startups and "Coming Home"

I was born and raised in Brockville, Ontario, and I've always been a proud Canadian. In 2000, I decided to leave my homeland to pursue career options south of the 49th parallel, so I became an active participant in Canada's so-called "brain drain." It's never easy starting over, but I felt that my options were limited in Canada and that I wouldn't find many opportunities to make an impact on a global stage.

Fast-forward to 2012. Early in the year, we were introduced to GrowLab — a leading Vancouver based accelerator — by our friends at East Side Games Studio. They seemed to have a lot of incredible stuff going on, so I planned an exploratory mission of sorts ... In June, I'd visit a few Canadian cities with an open mind to see what, if anything, had changed. With the Catalyst Program's amazing success in the US, I hoped we could hunt down one or two Canadian startups and accelerators to help out.

I was very pleasantly surprised at what I found: A vibrant, thriving Canadian community of entrepreneurs that seemed to match or exceed the startup activity I've seen in Silicon Valley, Boulder, Boston, New York, Amsterdam, Hong Kong, and Dubai. How times have changed! Investing in the Canadian startup scene was a no-brainer.

Canada Approved

The Catalyst team hit the ground running and immediately started working with GrowLab and several other incredible organizations like Communitech, Ryerson University Digital Media Zone (DMZ), Innovation Factory, Extreme Startups and the Ontario Network of Excellence (ONE).

We'll enroll startups participating in those organizations into the Catalyst Program, and we'll provide infrastructure credits (for servers, storage and networking), executive mentoring, engineering resources and limited financial support. SoftLayer wants to become the de facto Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) provider for Canadian startups and startups worldwide, so this is a huge first step onto the international stage. More importantly — and on a personal level — I'm excited that we get to help new companies in Canada make a global impact with us.

As a Canadian expat, having the opportunity to give something back means a great deal to me. I see an incredible opportunity to nurture and help some of these Canadian startups take flight. SoftLayer is still an entrepreneurial company at heart, and we have a unique perspective on what it takes to build and scale the next killer app or game, so we feel especially suited to the task.

One of the Canadian entrepreneurs we've been working with sent us this great video produced by the Vancouver-based GROW Conference about entrepreneurship, and it immediately resonated with me, so I wanted to be sure to include it in this post:

We've already started working with dozens entrepreneurs in Vancouver, Toronto, Hamilton and Waterloo who embody that video and have kindred spirits to my own. SoftLayer has a few Canadian ex-pats on our team, and as Catalyst moves into Canada officially, we're all extremely proud of our heritage and the opportunity we have to help.

Some have called our foray into the Canadian market an "international expansion" of sorts, I think of it more as a "coming home party."

-@gkdog

Canada Approved

May 27, 2010

Here I sit

So here I sit broken hearted, oh wait wrong story. Here I sit at the booth at GDC in Vancouver Canada in a traffic lull. There must be a good speaker talking at the moment. It gives me a moment to tell you about the refreshing “youth” of this industry. At this show people get it, they understand the model. This isn’t the largest show we will go to and might not sell a million servers but we are still getting the word out that outsourcing the hard stuff and letting people focus on what they do best is a great thing. Game developers don’t want to waste a day or two setting up a server they would rather be making their game. It’s also interesting listening to the students of game development at this show; I am learning what is going into the next big game. Here it is in a nutshell. You start with Zombies, and then have zombie riots where zombies kill some people and then you have the zombies take over the world and then you have a new breed of zombies that kill and eat the existing zombies. There you have it, the next big game! I want royalties. So for all you game lovers out there this is the place where it all begins and SoftLayer is doing everything we can to make sure these developers have the free time to make the next killer app. You can thank us anytime! And who knows maybe one of these guys will buy a million servers!

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