Posts Tagged 'CDN'

February 15, 2012

SoftLayer + OpenStack Swift = SoftLayer Object Storage

Since our inception in 2005, SoftLayer's goal has been to provide an array of on-demand data center and hosting services that combine exceptional access, control, scalability and security with unparalleled network robustness and ease of use ... That's why we're so excited to unveil SoftLayer Object Storage to our customers.

Based on OpenStack Object Storage (codenamed Swift) — open-source software that allows the creation of redundant, scalable object storage on clusters of standardized servers — SoftLayer Object Storage provides customers with new opportunities to leverage cost-effective cloud-based storage and to simultaneously realize significant capex-related cost savings.

OpenStack has been phenomenally successful thanks to a global software community comprised of developers and other technologists that has built and tweaked a standards-based, massively scalable open-source platform for public and private cloud computing. The simple goal of the OpenStack project is to deliver code that enables any organization to create and offer feature-rich cloud computing services from industry-standard hardware. The overarching OpenStack technology consists of several interrelated project components: One for compute, one for an image service, one for object storage, and a few more projects in development.

SoftLayer Object Storage
Like the OpenStack Swift system on which it is based, SoftLayer Object Storage is not a file system or real-time data-storage system, rather it's a long-term storage system for a more permanent type of static data that can be retrieved, leveraged and updated when necessary. Typical applications for this type of storage can involve virtual machine images, photo storage, email storage and backup archiving.

One of the primary benefits of Object Storage is the role that it can play in automating and streamlining data storage in cloud computing environments. SoftLayer Object Storage offers rich metadata features and search capability that can be leveraged to automate the way unstructured data gets accessed. In this way, SoftLayer Object Storage will provide organizations with new capabilities for improving overall data management and storage efficiency.

File Storage v. Object Storage
To better understand the difference between file storage and object storage, let's look at how file storage and object storage differ when it comes to metadata and search for a simple photo image. When a digital camera or camera-enabled phone snaps a photo, it embeds a series of metadata values in the image. If you save the image in a standard image file format, you can search for it by standard file properties like name, date and size. If you save the same image with additional metadata as an object, you can set object metadata values for the image (after reading them from the image file). This detail provides granular search capability based on the metadata keys and values, in addition to the standard object properties. Here is a sample comparison of an image's metadata value in both systems:

File Metadata Object Metadata
Name:img01.jpg Name:img01.jpg
Date: 2012-02-13 Date:2012-02-13
Size:1.2MB Size:1.2MB
Manufacturer:CASIO
Model:QV-4000
x-Resolution:72.00
y-Resolution:72.00
PixelXDimension:2240
PixelYDimension:1680
FNumber:f/4.0
Exposure Time:1/659 sec.

Using the rich metadata and search capability enabled by object storage, you would be able to search for all images with a dimension of 2240x1680 or a resolution of 72x72 in a quick/automated fashion. The object storage system "understands" more about what is being stored because it is able to differentiate files based on characteristics that you define.

What Makes SoftLayer Object Storage Different?
SoftLayer Object Storage features several unique features and ways for SoftLayer customers to upload, access and manage data:

  • Search — Quickly access information through user-defined metadata key-value pairs, file name or unique identifier
  • CDN — Serve your content globally over our high-performance content delivery network
  • Private Network — Free, secure private network traffic between all data centers and storage cluster nodes
  • API — Access to a full-feature OpenStack-compatible API with additional support for CDN and search integration
  • Portal — Web application integrated into the SoftLayer portal
  • Mobile — iPhone and Android mobile apps, with Windows Phone app coming soon
  • Language Bindings — Feature-complete bindings for Java, PHP, Python and Ruby*

*Language bindings, documentation, and guides are available on SLDN.

We think SoftLayer Object Storage will be attractive to a broad range of current and prospective customers, from web-centric businesses dependent on file sharing and content distribution to legal/medical/financial-services companies which possess large volumes of data that must be stored securely while remaining readily accessible.

SoftLayer Object Storage significantly extends our cloud-services portfolio while substantially enriching the storage capabilities that we bring to our customers. What are you waiting for? Go order yourself some object storage @ $0.12/GB!

-Marc

June 9, 2010

DNS from All Angles

Serving up content on the internet can be a tricky business. It isn’t just about running a web or app server(s) in an efficient and reliable manner. One of the other critical factors is DNS. You have to understand and optimize how the name the content is advertised under gets translated to the IP address of the content. I don’t want to turn this into a DNS primer, but the two ends of the line of communication are the authoritative DNS server controlled by the domain owner which stores the official translation of the name to the number and the resolving DNS server which acts as a cache and is where the end-user connects to directly. Both ends of the chain have their own idiosyncrasies which can affect how quickly and reliably your content gets delivered.

On the end-user side, I just read an article about how public DNS providers like OpenDNS and Google are breaking the internet. OK, maybe not breaking the internet, but the public DNS providers are confusing CDN location-based algorithms. The article is here: http://www.sajalkayan.com/in-a-cdnd-world-opendns-is-the-enemy.html and I recommend strongly that both content providers and content consumers read it.

The summary is that some CDN algorithms use the ip address (and location) of the DNS server making the request and if that DNS server is nowhere near the end-user on the internet, the end-user will get served content from farther away and will get that content slower than desired. The conclusion is that an end-user should always use a DNS server located as close as possible network-wise, usually that ends up being a DNS server of the network provider.

That is good advice for the end-user, but what about the content provider? If you flip this around and come at DNS from the content provider’s point of view who doesn’t use CDN, you want to make sure that when a DNS request is made, that your authoritative DNS server gets the ip address as fast and reliably as possible back to the end-user.

SoftLayer has built out authoritative DNS farms in all our Datacenters and Network POPs and anycasted the ip addresses for the name servers. What that means is that SoftLayer customers – who get to use our DNS for free – can have their authoritative domain services hosted at all 10 points in North America and through the routing optimization inherent in the internet, the name to number conversion for those domains will happen as close as possible to the end-user and the results will be delivered as quickly as possible.

One very important goal of every content provider is to get the end-user the best experience as possible. Understanding how the internet works from the end-user and well as the server-side is critical. It doesn’t matter how good your content or app is if the end-user has a poor experience.

-@nday91

August 28, 2008

The Speed of Light is Your Enemy

One of my favorite sites is highscalability.com. As someone with an engineering background, reading about the ways other people solve a variety of problems is really quite interesting.

A recent article talks about the impact of latency on web site viewers. It sounds like common sense that the slower a site is, the more viewers you lose, but what is amazing is that even a latency measured in milliseconds can cost a web site viewers.

The article focuses mainly on application specific solutions to latency, and briefly mentions how to deliver static content like images, videos, documents, etc. There are a couple ways to solve the static content delivery problem such as making your web server as efficient as you can. But that can only help so much. Physics - the speed of light - starts to be your enemy. If you are truly worried about shaving milliseconds off your content delivery time, you have to get your content closer to your viewers.

You can do this yourself by getting servers in datacenters in multiple sites in different geographic locations. This isn't the easiest solution for everyone but does have its advantages such as keeping you in absolute control of your content. The much easier option is to use a CDN (Content Delivery Network).

CDNs are getting more popular and the price is dropping rapidly. Akamai isn't the only game in town anymore and you don't have to pay dollars per GB of traffic or sign a contract with a large commit for a multi-year time frame. CDN traffic costs can be very competitive costing only a few pennies more per Gb compared with traffic costs from a shared or dedicated server. Plus, CDNs optimize their servers for delivering content quickly.

Just to throw some math into the discussion let's see how long it would take an electron to go from New York to San Francisco (4,125,910 meters / 299,792,458 meters per second = 13.7 milliseconds). 13.7 millisconds one way, now double that for the request to go there and the response to return. Now we are up to 27.4 milliseconds. And that is assuming a straight shot with no routers slowing things down. Let's look at Melbourne to London. (16,891,360 meters / 299,792,458 meters per second = 56.3 milliseconds). Now double that, throw in some router overhead and you can see that the delays are starting to be noticeable.

The moral of the story is that for most everybody, distributing static content geographically using a CDN is the right thing to do. That problem has been solved. The harder problem is how to get your application running as efficiently as possible. I'll leave that topic for another time.

-@nday91

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