Posts Tagged 'Cloud'

October 5, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1, No. 15

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

It’s time to Box.
Which cloud platform will offer Box first? We will! Our new deal with Box helps the company expand its customer base and further its IBM partnership. Whitney Bouck, general manager at Box, said, “This is a fabulous step in the right direction and satisfies the majority of customers in Europe that have maybe been uncomfortable with a U.S.-only data centre approach.”

EVRY one gets cloud.
IBM will be the go-to provider for EVRY Partners’ cloud infrastructure offerings. The services will start running in SoftLayer data centers in 2016. “Our partnership demonstrates how IBM’s expertise, technology and services can help EVRY adapt to new market conditions and opportunities while having trusted infrastructure services supporting the ongoing operations,” said Martin Jetter, senior vice president at IBM Global Technology Services.

With new platforms comes cloud growth.
How does IBM expand its global business solutions? With cloud, of course. Sanjay Rishi, managing partner at IBM Global Business Services, said, "Our new IBM Cloud Business Innovation Center will help us co-create with our clients, addressing their unique needs with tailored solutions, delivered on the cloud for fast results."

Welcome to the family!
Cleversafe, a data storage vendor newly acquired by IBM, is the next step in providing customers a way to “build a hybrid bridge to the cloud.” IBM discussed the benefits of Cleversafe in a press release, saying, “The company uses unique algorithms to slice data into pieces and reassemble the information from a single copy, rather than simply making multiple copies of the data, which is how storage traditionally has been done. As a result, Cleversafe can store data significantly cheaper and with greater security.” We would like to welcome Cleversafe to the IBM family!


September 4, 2015

Under the Infrastructure: Solving real problems with software engineer Neetu Jain

Do you love getting to know us in our Under the Infrastructure series? We certainly hope so, because we’re having a blast lifting the veil on our cloud layer.

Lest you think only male employees work at our fine company, this week we’re introducing you to software engineer Neetu Jain. She’s been with us a little over a year and a half, and she calls our Dallas headquarters home base.

SoftLayer: Why did you choose to become a software engineer?

Neetu Jain: When I was first introduced to programming, I felt it was pretty empowering (like, “You had me at “Hello!”). I could make the computer do whatever I wanted if done properly with a reasonable goal in mind. So that I guess lured me into it, and after that, it was a natural progression. I did my bachelor’s in electronics because I was fascinated by embedded electronics all around me, but computer science was instant gratification. You don’t have to wait at all to see the results of your creation—just run the code!

SL: You can manipulate computers. You’re like the Wizard of Oz.

Jain: In many other fields (such as construction), you must depend on people, resources, and waiting, for things to happen. Due to long turnaround cycles, sometimes it can take years before you see you see the fruits of your work. But if you can just sit down at your computer and make it happen, you have a much shorter turnaround time!

SL: Absolutely.

Jain: So, you know, it was like, “This is pretty cool.”

SL: We agree. So what’s your favorite thing about working at SoftLayer?

Jain: It’s about getting to learn new technologies. There’s a tremendous scope for learning in this domain, and you get opportunities to learn because Softlayer is growing so much.

SL: What advice would you give to someone who’s starting out in software engineering?

Jain: Ask questions. In the first year I joined the cloud domain, I was like, “OK, I’ll learn.” I wasn’t asking around too much. I wasn’t asking for feedback. I realized after a year that I had to make myself more visible. I had to ask more questions. If I had questions, I couldn’t just sit around and wait for the answers to come. I needed to ping people and be more proactive. The first year, I didn’t do that enough.

SL: People are really receptive when you’re asking questions, and they’re willing to help?

Jain: You’ll find some people who are and some people who are not. [Laughs] At least you get that information. Initially, I was working at my desk, doing and learning my stuff and waiting to prove myself. There’s nobody coming to you and asking what you’re doing, and you don’t have any visibility as a result. But if you’re proactive, people know about you, you can tell them what you’re working on, and you can ask questions about what’s going on in their world, and thus, you get to make a connection—which makes the workplace more enjoyable.

SL: We think a lot of people view software engineering as an antisocial profession.

Jain: Yeah, it is, because you can sit on your computer all day, and not talk to anybody.

SL: But you’re saying that asking questions and actually interacting is going to help you.

Jain: It does a lot. In my case, I joined the product innovation team, which was a small team. Then I was moved to another team, and they had absolutely no idea what I was working on. So, if I would’ve been more proactive and connected with them, then I could have eliminated that scenario.

SL: What do you predict or hope for the future of software engineering?

Jain: I’m the oracle now! [Laughs] I want software engineering—or, basically, any engineering—to solve real problems. I went to a hackathon, and most of the ideas were like, “Share your playlist on the road” or an Internet of Things kind of thing, like, “Take periodic pictures with geographically separated friends on the go,” and this and that. What struck me was that we had so many resources, so many amazing brains there—maybe we could have worked on more realistic issues?

There are so many things we can solve. I volunteer at a lot of organizations, especially ones that work in India: Vibha, Association for India’s Development (AID), Systers, etc. Many of the issues they face can probably be better solved through a meaningful use of technology.

For example, Annakshetra basically takes leftover food and provides it to the poor. But there’s one basic problem: how does it test the food to know if it’s fit for consumption? There needs to be a low-cost, easy-to-use solution, because if somebody gets sick, nobody’s ever going to come again. How about a low-cost litmus test where you can test and say, “OK, it’s germ-free”? I thought this should be an easily solvable problem. Why don’t we solve these kinds of problems in a hackathon rather than somebody going on a road trip sharing playlists?

SL: That’s a really good point.

Jain: Even though it was a great experience, I was a tad disappointed with the fact that there were so many of these ideas. I ended up there by accident with a friend, totally unprepared, and it was my first. I started asking questions like, “What can a smart car do? Can a smart car detect if there’s a baby inside?” (There are a lot of babies dying in locked cars due to exposure to extreme temperatures.) So if a smart car can detect whether there’s a baby inside, whether the car is locked, and whether the temperature is rising, it can send push notifications.

That’s the idea I pitched, but [the attendees] were all young grad students; none of them found it interesting—only the handful of parents and pet owners did. But in my view, that’s a real problem.

SL: It makes sense. Why don’t we figure out how to solve real problems for real people?

Jain: You could say that “real” is subjective, but I wish there was somebody who’d say, “We have limited resources; we are going to solve these problems rather than those.”

SL: Now you make us want to be software engineers.

Jain: In any field, we can all solve these problems. It’s about directing someone to think that way—you know, “While you’re thinking about this, think about that, too.”

SL: If you could have one superpower, what would it be? Any superpower at all.

Jain: To read people’s minds. [Laughs] I don’t like when people say one thing and mean something else. I am like, “I want to read your mind. What exactly do you mean?”

SL: That’s a very software engineer stance. “Now let me get behind that to understand why you said that.” That would be ours too.

Saving the world through software? Don’t say SoftLayer never taught you anything.


September 3, 2015

Cloud, Interrupted: The Official SoftLayer Podcast

Have you ever wondered what happens when you put three cloud guys in a room to talk cloud? Our curiosity was insatiable, so doggone it, we went and did it. We hereby officially present to you our brand new podcast: Cloud, Interrupted.

Join Kevin Hazard, director of digital content, Phil Jackson, lead technology evangelist, and Teddy Vandenberg, manager of network provisioning, as they wreak havoc interrupting the world of cloud.

In case you’re a skimmer, here’s the highlight reel:

  • [00:00:05] Phil isn't a Stanley, but he is a germophobe.
  • [00:01:44] Are we interrupted by the cloud or are we interrupting the cloud?
  • [00:03:22] We have goals with this podcast, we swear.
  • [00:04:34] Teddy drops the bass.
  • [00:05:58] What's a better word for "cloud" than "cloud"?
  • [00:08:12] Where social interaction influences the real world: Meet "passive computing" and the trifecta.
  • [00:10:44] Who cares what Phil has to say?
  • [00:11:51] Phil reminisces about that time he explained web hosting to the Harris County Tax Office.
  • [00:16:02] Then Teddy's analogy was used against Phil.
  • [00:19:21] IBM to the rescue!
  • [00:20:45] Oops. He had to do it again.
  • [00:23:11] New and old technologies get lost in translation. "To the cloud!"
  • [00:25:54] You exist in the cloud more and you will start to understand the cloud more.
  • [00:30:31] Now this is a podcast about Costco.
  • [00:31:03] Wait a second. Who's Kevin? And why isn't SoftLayer on Snapchat?
  • [00:32:56] Teddy's relationship with IBM is complicated, but the cat is fine.
  • [00:33:45] Hot tip: Unplug both ends of your telephone cable and reverse it.

We hope you dig it.


September 2, 2015

Backup and Restore in a Cloud and DevOps World

Virtualization has brought many improvements to the compute infrastructure, including snapshots and live migration1. When an infrastructure moves to the cloud, these options often become a client’s primary backup strategy. While snapshots and live migration are also part of a successful strategy, backing up on the cloud may need additional tools.

First, a basic question: Why do we take backups? They’re taken to recover from

  • The loss of an entire machine
  • Partially corrupted files
  • A complete data loss (either through hardware or human error)

While losing an entire machine is frightening, corrupted files or data loss are the more common reasons for data backups.

Snapshots are useful when the snapshot and restore occur in close proximity to each other, e.g., when you’re migrating middleware or an operating system and want to fall back quickly if something goes wrong. If you need to restore after extensive changes (hardware or data), a snapshot isn’t an adequate resource. The restore may require restoring to a new machine, selecting files to be restored, and moving data back to the original machine.

So if a snapshot isn’t the silver bullet for backing up in the cloud, what are the effective backup alternatives? The solution needs to handle a full system loss, partial data loss, or corruption, and ideally work for both virtualized and non-virtualized environments.

What to back up

There are three types of files that you’ll want to consider when backing up an active machine’s disks:

  • Binary files: Changed by operating system and middleware updates; can be easily stored and recovered.
  • Configuration files: Defined by how the binary files are connected, configured, and what data is accessible to them.
  • Data files: Generated by users and unrecoverable if not backed up. Data files are the most precious part of the disk content and losing them may result in a financial impact on the client’s business.

Keep in mind when determining your backup strategy that each file type has a different change rate—data files change faster than configuration files, which are more fluid than binary files. So, what are your options for backing up and restoring each type of file?

Binary files
In the case of a system failure, DevOps advocates (see Phoenix Servers from Martin Fowler) propose getting a new machine, which all cloud providers can automatically provision, including middleware. Automated provisioning processes are available for both bare metal and virtual machines.

Note that most Open Source products only require an Internet connection and a single command line for installation, while commercial products can be provisioned through automation.

Configuration files
Cloud-centric operations have a distinct advantage over traditional operations when it comes to backing up configuration files. With traditional operations, each element is configured manually, which has several drawbacks such as being time-consuming and error-prone. Cloud-centric operations, or DevOps, treat each configuration as code, which allows an environment to be built from a source configuration via automated tools and procedures. Tools such as Chef, Puppet, Ansible, and SaltStack show their power with central configuration repositories that are used to drive the composition of an environment. A central repository works well with another component of automated provisioning—changing the IP address and hostname.

You have limited control of how the cloud will allocate resources, so you need an automated method to collect the information and apply it to all the machines being provisioned.

In a cloud context, it’s suboptimal to manage machines individually; instead, the machines have to be seen as part of a cluster of servers, managed via automation. Cluster automation is one the core tenants of solutions like CoreOS’ Fleet and Apache Mesos. Resources are allocated and managed as a single entity via API, configuration repositories, and automation.

You can attain automation in small steps. Start by choosing an automation tool and begin converting your existing environment one file at a time. Soon, your entire configuration is centrally available and recovering a machine or deploying a full environment is possible with a single automated process.

In addition to being able to quickly provision new machines with your binary and configuration files, you are also able to create parallel environments, such as disaster recovery, test and development, and quality assurance. Using the same provisioning process for all of your environments assures consistent environments and early detection of potential production problems. Packages, binaries, and configuration files can be treated as data and stored in something similar to object stores, which are available in some form with all cloud solutions.

Data files
The final files to be backed up and restored are the data files. These files are the most important part of a backup and restore and the hardest ones to replace. Part of the challenge is the volume of data as well as access to it. Data files are relatively easy to back up; the exception being files that are in transition, e.g., files being uploaded. Data file backups can be done with several tools, including synchronization tools or a full file backup solution. Another option is object stores, which is the natural repository for relatively static files, and allows for a pay–as-you-go model.

Database content is a bit harder to back up. Even with instant snapshots on storage, backing up databases can be challenging. A snapshot at the storage level is an option, but it doesn’t allow for a partial database restore. Also, a snapshot can capture inflight transactions that can cause issues during a restore; which is why most database systems provide a mechanism for online backups. The online backups should be leveraged in combination with tools for file backups.

Something to remember about databases: many solutions end up accumulating data even after the data is no longer used by users. The data within an active database includes data currently being used and historical data. Having current and historical data allows for data analytics on the same database, it also increases the size of the database, making database-related operations harder. It may make sense to archive older data in either other databases or flat files, which makes the database volumes manageable.


To recap, because cloud provides rapid deployment of your operating system and convenient places to store data (such as object stores), it’s easy to factor cloud into your backup and recovery strategy. By leveraging the containerization approach, you should split the content of your machines—binary, configuration, and data. Focus on automating the deployment of binaries and configuration; it allows easier delivery of an environment, including quality assurance, test, and disaster recovery. Finally, use traditional backup tools for backing up data files. These tools make it possible to rapidly and repeatedly recover complete environments while controlling the amount of backed up data that has to be managed.


1 Snapshots are not available on bare metal servers that have no virtualization capability.

August 11, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1, No. 14

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

We’re revving the IBM Cloud engine.
How is SoftLayer helping IBM’s cloud grow? Ed Scannell explores this in a new TechTarget article. He says many of the latest successes are “attributed to the IBM cloud unit's ability to respond faster to market opportunities, along with the ability to build corporate data centers significantly faster than IGS via SoftLayer.”

It’s time to turn to the cloud.
Across the industry, companies are seeing legacy software decreases. In a recent CBR article, James Nunns says he believes the solution could be in the cloud, and he highlights some of the transitions that IBM is making. Steve Robinson, IBM’s general manager of cloud platform services, says, "Today's rapid app development cycles require developers to use new tools and methodologies from across the ecosystem to quickly turn new ideas into enterprise-class cloud applications at consumer scale and innovate at the speed of cloud."

A case for both private and public cloud.
Are you still writing a pros and cons list to compare private and public cloud? It’s time to put the list away. IBMer Philip Guido explains, “Over the next five years, both public and private clouds are expected to grow at the exact same compound annual growth rate.” One thing to remember is that the choice of cloud model is “largely predicated by the business conditions of the industry a company is operating in.”


July 27, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1, No. 13

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

Growing Strong For Two Years
What has happened in the two years since SoftLayer joined forces with IBM? In a word: growth. Growth in several areas was spotlighted by 451 Research report. The article noted that SoftLayer is “no longer just an IaaS offer, but the foundation on which IBM is building strategic products. IBM Bluemix PaaS, data services and multiple SaaS offerings all run atop SoftLayer infrastructure.”

Welcome to The IBM Family
We’re excited to welcome Compose into our growing IBM brood. The acquisition was announced last week, but what does it bring the IBM family? Fortune highlights the company’s ability to “attract a new flock of web and mobile developers” to IBM, while offering up “lightweight database services based on MongoDB, Redis, Elasticsearch, PostgreSQL, RethinkDB and other databases.”

We’re Happy to Work With You
Core insurance technology software and IT services provider, Majesco, chose the IBM Cloud platform for its entire suite of property and casualty insurance software products to customers in a public cloud. In a write-up by IBR, Majesco’s COO Ed Ossie said, “Working with IBM will help insurers transform their business with a modern core solution that can be deployed on a proven and tested environment.”

A Chip Off The Old Block
IBM has designed the world’s smallest chip with the help of GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Samsung. Squint a bit and you might be able to see the 7 nm (yes, that’s a nanometer) chip that is the future of microprocessing.

In a statement, IBM called this new technology “crucial to meeting the anticipated demands of future cloud computing and Big Data systems, cognitive computing, mobile products, and other emerging technologies.”


July 2, 2015

All Cloud, No Front—Straight up Cloud Pricing, Now With Even More Price Control and Transparency

Yesterday, we announced a new pricing model that provides customers with even more visibility and control over cloud infrastructure costs.

While other cloud providers advertise “low” prices for incomplete solutions, they neglect to mention extra charges for essential resources like network bandwidth, primary system storage, and support.

At SoftLayer, our servers already include these necessary resources at no additional charge. That’s because we want to provide our customers with unmatched value and the best performance for price, which makes it easier to see actual costs of cloud solutions and budget accordingly.

Our new pricing model includes a redeveloped ordering and provisioning system that offers even more granular pricing for every SoftLayer bare metal and virtual server, from the processor to the RAM, storage, networking, security, and more.

With this new pricing announcement, we’re also introducing new configuration options for bare metal servers, including increased RAM—up to 3TB—and two new SSD drive options—960GB and 1.2TB.

To fully understand the benefits of our new pricing model, let’s take a look at the example below for an Intel Dual Xeon E5-2620 (4U) server.

You can see that our new pricing saves customers ordering this server $1,780 (or 39 percent) over the old pricing model.

Additionally, as part of yesterday's announcement, we’re launching new pricing for services based on data center location. Location-based pricing displays unique pricing for each data center and removes flat- and percentage-based surcharges, giving customers even more price transparency.

You can learn more about SoftLayer’s pricing philosophy on our website.


June 29, 2015

Opening Up the Cloud

This guest blog post is written by Alexia Emmanoulopoulou, marketing manager at Canonical.

With OpenStack, cloud computing becomes easily accessible to everyone. It tears down financial barriers to cloud deployments and tackles the fear of lock-in. One of the main benefits of OpenStack is the fact that it is open source and supported by a wide ecosystem, with contributions from more than 200 companies, including Canonical and IBM. Users can change service providers and hardware at any time, and compared to other clouds using virtualization technology, OpenStack can double server utilization to as much as 85 percent. This means that an OpenStack cloud is economical and delivers more flexibility, scalability, and agility to businesses. The challenge however lies in recruiting and retaining OpenStack experts, who are in high demand, making it hard for companies to deploy OpenStack on time and on budget. But BootStack, Canonical’s managed cloud product solved that problem by offering all the benefits of a private cloud without any of the pain of day-to-day infrastructure management.

Addressing the Challenge of Finding OpenStack Experts

Resourcing an OpenStack six-strong team to work 24x7 would cost between $900,000 and $1.5 million and can take months of headhunting. Thus the savings that OpenStack should bring companies are eroded so Canonical created BootStack, short for Build, Operate, and Optionally Transfer. It’s a new service for setting up and operating an OpenStack cloud, in both on-premises and hosted environments, and it gives users the option of taking over the management of your cloud in the future.

After working with each customer to define their requirements and specify the right cloud infrastructure for their business, Canonical’s experienced engineering and support team builds and manages the entire cloud infrastructure of the customer, including Ubuntu OpenStack, the underlying hypervisor, and deployment onto hosted or on-premises hardware. As a result, users get all the benefits of a private cloud without any of the pain of day-to-day infrastructure management. For added protection, BootStack is backed by a clear SLA that covers cloud availability at the user’s desired scale as well as uptime and responsiveness metrics.

Choosing Between On-premises and Hosted Cloud

Some companies prefer to host on-premises because they feel more secure knowing their cloud is running on their own site. However, when things go wrong, some companies find they don’t have the expertise on-hand to quickly recover. Furthermore, on-site hosting is at least three times as expensive as it is to outsource to a hosting specialist.

With the hosted option for BootStack, your OpenStack cloud will be hosted on Ubuntu-certified hardware in SoftLayer data centers. SoftLayer provides customizable bare metal and virtual servers run on the highest performing cloud infrastructure available. Users can seamlessly move data between servers at no cost and benefit from secure, fast, and low-latency communications between data centers. 24x7 expert staff in each data center can troubleshoot any rare issues that can’t be directly resolved through their self-service management portal. Canonical and SoftLayer also take care of patches and upgrades to both the operating system and OpenStack, hardware and software failure prevention and fix, proactive health monitoring of the cloud and hardware, and resolution of any other problems.

No Lock-In and Predictable Cost

The two features that set BootStack apart from other managed cloud products are the predictable cost structure and the lack of lock-in. With BootStack, users can access every tool and every machine, any time. A company can choose to take over the management of its cloud at any time, at which point it will receive training and support from Canonical to ensure a smooth transition. BootStack customers can then choose to either bring their cloud in-house or continue hosting with SoftLayer.

In terms of costs, BootStack cloud is priced at $15 per day per server, plus the cost of the hosting. SoftLayer offers a number of bare metal servers that exceed the OpenStack recommended configuration, starting at $699 per month. You pay as you go, and can scale as your business needs change.

All-in-all, it’s a flexible managed cloud at a predictable cost with expert staff to manage it until you’re ready to take over!

For more information about BootStack, SoftLayer, and OpenStack, download our free white paper: The Easiest Way to Build and Manage an OpenStack Cloud.


June 19, 2015

Big Data Academy Rewind: Gaming and Mobile App Development Webinar

If you’ve been following along at home (and we hope you have been), you’re probably well-versed in SoftLayer and Cloudant’s free Big Data Academy, the (free) webinar and workshop series designed to teach you all about deploying big data workloads in the cloud, optimizing your infrastructure environment, and capitalizing on the value of your data. (Did we mention it’s free?)

And over the past two weeks, we’ve been recapping and rewinding our Big Data Academy webinar series right here on the blog. You’ve learned how to make the cloud work for those big data applications in the land of e-commerce in “Always Be Open for Business with Cloud Solutions for E-commerce.” Then you delved into the hybrid cloud with “Trusted Computing in a Hybrid Cloud Environment.”

In this, our final week of the Big Data Academy rewind, we’ll explore everyone’s favorite big data beast: gaming and mobile app development. Challenges and solutions? We’ve got them.

Watch the webinar below:

Did you enjoy these Big Data Academy webinars? Well, get offline and follow them to Europe! The Big Data Academy is trekking across the continent this summer, with free in-person workshops in Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Paris, and Helsinki throughout June and July. Register now and max out that summer vacation with a European workshop. (Bonus: All workshop participants will receive a special offer up to $1,250 per month for six months on SoftLayer.)


  • [00:00:33.00]   Introduction of Howard Smith, SoftLayer Director of Sales Engineering
  • [00:01:02.00]   Overview of SoftLayer
  • [00:09:44.00]   Why SoftLayer?
  • [00:11:53.00]    Big Data (NOSQL) Challenges & SoftLayer Cloud Advantages
  • [00:14:55.00]   SoftLayer Cloud Advantages for Game Development
  • [00:16:36.00]   Big Data Solutions Optimized on SoftLayer
  • [00:18:08.00]   SoftLayer Customer Success Stories
  • [00:22:52.00]   Why Choose Cloudant on SoftLayer?
  • [00:26:25.00]   Introduction of Glynn Bird, IBM Cloudant Developer Advocate
  • [00:27:11.00]    The State of the Digital World, Data Delivery & Choosing a Database
  • [00:32:33.00]   Introduction to IBM Cloudant
  • [00:36:40.00]   Why Gaming and Mobile App Devs Use Cloudant
  • [00:43:14.00]    Cloudant is for Gaming
  • [00:46:36.00]   Cloudant & Mobile App Development
  • [00:49:08.00]   Questions & Conclusion


May 12, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1, No. 12

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

We've got the power
What makes an existing partnership better? More power, of course. IBM and SAP strengthened the bond by adding a new set of integrated Power Systems solutions for SAP HANA in-memory computer applications: POWER8 servers. Welcome to a new era of high speed, high volume data processing.

Straight from the horse’s mouth
On the subject of IBM’s cloudy future, Forbes sat down with none other than Robert LeBlanc, SVP of IBM’s Cloud Business, to clear the haze. Ambition, AWS envy, and giving up on the public cloud? It’s all there.

Friending Facebook
If your company could target the right folks on Facebook, would it be interested? That’s what IBM’s latest ad partnership with the social network is all about. A write-up in Fast Company provides all the details behind the cooperative, which is aimed to "more accurately identify which of [a company’s] customers are among the 1.44 billion people active on Facebook.” After all, learning to leverage the social web just makes sense.

We’re so happy for you
When big things happen for our customers, we love to highlight them. Longtime IBM business partner Manhattan Associates chose IBM Cloud as a preferred cloud provider for its clients (which includes tech support for those running their applications on SoftLayer). And Distribution Central is now offering its 1,000 resellers access to AWS, Azure and IBM Cloud’s SoftLayer cloud services through a single interface. Way to go, everyone.

No autographs, please!
Oh, and it’s come to our attention that we were mentioned on the latest episode of HBO’s Silicon Valley. Although the scenario in which we were mentioned wasn't quite factually accurate, being famous looks good on us, if we do say so ourselves. Now if you’ll excuse us, we’re going to inquire into our star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.


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