Posts Tagged 'Cloud Migration'

April 26, 2016

Cloud. Ready-to-Wear.

It’s been five years since I started my journey with SoftLayer. And what a journey it has been—from being one of the first few folks in our Amsterdam office, to becoming part of the mega-family of IBMers; from one data center in Europe to six on this side of the pond and 40+ around the globe; from “Who is SoftLayer?” (or my favorite, “SoftPlayer”), to becoming a cloud environment fundamental for some of the biggest and boldest organizations worldwide.

But the most thrilling difference between 2016 and 2011 that I’ve been observing lately is a shift of the market’s perception of cloud, which matters are important to adopters, and the technology itself becoming mainstream.

Organizations of all sizes—small, medium, and large, while still raising valid questions around the level of control and security—are more often talking about challenges regarding managing the combined on-prem and shared environments, readiness of their legacy applications to migrate to cloud, and their staff competency to orchestrate the new architecture.

At Cloud Expo 2016 (the fifth one for the SoftLayer EMEA team), next to two tremendous keynotes given by Sebastian Krause, General Manager IBM Cloud Europe, and by Rashik Parmar, Lead IBM Cloud Advisor/Europe IBM Distinguished Engineer, we held a roundtable to discuss the connection between hybrid cloud and agile business. Moderated by Rashik Parmar, the discussion confirmed the market’s evolution: from recognizing cloud as technology still proving its value, to technology critical in gaining a competitive advantage in today’s dynamic economy.

Rashik’s guests had deep technology backgrounds and came from organizations of all sizes and flavors—banking, supply chain managements, ISV, publishing, manufacturing, MSP, insurance, and digital entertainment, to name a few. Most of them already have live cloud deployments, or they have one ready to go into production this year.

When it came to the core factors underlying a move into the cloud, they unanimously listed gaining business agility and faster time-to-market. For a few minutes, there was a lively conversation among the panelists about the cost and savings. They raised examples citing  poorly planned cloud implementations that were 20-30 percent more costly than keeping the legacy IT setup. Based on an example of a large Australian bank, Rashik urged companies to start the process of moving into cloud with a vigilant map of their own applications landscape before thinking about remodeling the architecture to accommodate cloud.

The next questions the panelists tackled pertained to the drivers behind building hybrid cloud environments, which included:

  • Starting with some workloads and building a business case based on their success; from there, expanding the solution organization-wide
  • Increasing the speed of market entry for new solutions and products
  • Retiring certain legacy applications on-prem, while deploying new ones on cloud
  • Regulatory requirements that demand some workloads or data to remain on-prem.

When asked to define “hybrid cloud,” Rashik addressed the highly ambiguous term by simply stating that it refers to any combination of software-defined environment and automation with traditional IT.

The delegates discussed the types of cloud—local, dedicated, and shared—and found it difficult to define who controls hybrid cloud, and who is accountable for what component when something goes wrong. There was a general agreement that many organizations still put physical security over the digital one, which is not entirely applicable in the world of cloud.

Rashik explored, from his experience, where most cases of migrating into cloud usually originate. He referred to usage patterns and how organizations become agile with hybrid IT. The delegates agreed that gaining an option of immediate burstability and removing the headache of optimal resource management, from hardware to internal talent, are especially important.

Rashik then addressed the inhibitors of moving into cloud—and here’s the part that inspired me to write this post. While mentions of security (data security and job security) and the control over the environment arose, the focus repeatedly shifted toward the challenges of applications being incompatible with cloud architecture, complicated applications landscape, and scarcity of IT professionals skilled in managing complex (hybrid) cloud environments.

This is a visible trend that demonstrates the market has left the cloud department store’s changing room, and ready not only to make the purchase, but “ready to wear” the new technology with a clear plan where, when, and with an aim to achieve specific outcomes.

The conversation ended with energizing insights about API-driven innovation that enables developers to assemble a wide spectrum of functions, as opposed to being “just a coder.” Other topics included cognitive computing that bridges digital business with digital intelligence, and platforms such as blockchain that are gaining momentum.

To think that not so long ago, I had to explain to the average Cloud Expo delegate what “IaaS” stand for. We’ve come a long way.

 

-Michalina

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