Posts Tagged 'Cloud'

December 17, 2014

Does physical location matter “in the cloud”?

By now everyone understands that the cloud is indeed a place on Earth, but there still seems to be confusion around why global expansion by way of adding data centers is such a big deal. After all, if data is stored “in the cloud,” why wouldn’t adding more servers in our existing data centers suffice? Well, there’s a much more significant reason for adding more data centers than just being able to host more data.

As we’ve explained in previous blog posts, Globalization and Hosting: The World Wide Web is Flat and Global Network: The Proof is in the Traceroute, our strategic objective is to get a network point of presence (PoP) within 40ms of all our users (and our users' users) in order to provide the best network stability and performance possible anywhere on the planet.

Data can travel across the Internet quickly, but just like anything, the farther something has to go, the longer it will take to get there. Seems pretty logical right? But we also need to take into account that not all routes are created equally. So to deliver the best network performance, we designed our global network to get data to the closest route possible to our network. Think of each SoftLayer PoP as an on-ramp to our global network backbone. The sooner a user is able to get onto our network, the quicker we can efficiently route them through our PoPs to a server in one of our data centers. Furthermore, once plugged into the network, we are able to control the flow of traffic.

Let’s take a look at this traceroute example from the abovementioned blog post. As you are probably aware, a traceroute shows the "hops" or routers along the network path from an origin IP to a destination IP. When we were building out the Singapore data center (before the network points of presence were turned up in Asia), the author ran a traceroute from Singapore to SoftLayer.com, and immediately after the launch of the data center, ran another one.

Pre-Launch Traceroute to SoftLayer.com from Singapore

traceroute to softlayer.com (66.228.118.53), 64 hops max, 52 byte packets
 1  10.151.60.1 (10.151.60.1)  1.884 ms  1.089 ms  1.569 ms
 2  10.151.50.11 (10.151.50.11)  2.006 ms  1.669 ms  1.753 ms
 3  119.75.13.65 (119.75.13.65)  3.380 ms  3.388 ms  4.344 ms
 4  58.185.229.69 (58.185.229.69)  3.684 ms  3.348 ms  3.919 ms
 5  165.21.255.37 (165.21.255.37)  9.002 ms  3.516 ms  4.228 ms
 6  165.21.12.4 (165.21.12.4)  3.716 ms  3.965 ms  5.663 ms
 7  203.208.190.21 (203.208.190.21)  4.442 ms  4.117 ms  4.967 ms
 8  203.208.153.241 (203.208.153.241)  6.807 ms  55.288 ms  56.211 ms
 9  so-2-0-3-0.laxow-cr1.ix.singtel.com (203.208.149.238)  187.953 ms  188.447 ms  187.809 ms
10  ge-4-0-0-0.laxow-dr2.ix.singtel.com (203.208.149.34)  184.143 ms
    ge-4-1-1-0.sngc3-dr1.ix.singtel.com (203.208.149.138)  189.510 ms
    ge-4-0-0-0.laxow-dr2.ix.singtel.com (203.208.149.34)  289.039 ms
11  203.208.171.98 (203.208.171.98)  187.645 ms  188.700 ms  187.912 ms
12  te1-6.bbr01.cs01.lax01.networklayer.com (66.109.11.42)  186.482 ms  188.265 ms  187.021 ms
13  ae7.bbr01.cs01.lax01.networklayer.com (173.192.18.166)  188.569 ms  191.100 ms  188.736 ms
14  po5.bbr01.eq01.dal01.networklayer.com (173.192.18.140)  381.645 ms  410.052 ms  420.311 ms
15  ae0.dar01.sr01.dal01.networklayer.com (173.192.18.211)  415.379 ms  415.902 ms  418.339 ms
16  po1.slr01.sr01.dal01.networklayer.com (66.228.118.138)  417.426 ms  417.301 ms
    po2.slr01.sr01.dal01.networklayer.com (66.228.118.142)  416.692 ms
17  * * *

Post-Launch Traceroute to SoftLayer.com from Singapore

traceroute to softlayer.com (66.228.118.53), 64 hops max, 52 byte packets
 1  192.168.206.1 (192.168.206.1)  2.850 ms  1.409 ms  1.206 ms
 2  174.133.118.65-static.reverse.networklayer.com (174.133.118.65)  1.550 ms  1.680 ms  1.394 ms
 3  ae4.dar01.sr03.sng01.networklayer.com (174.133.118.136)  1.812 ms  1.341 ms  1.734 ms
 4  ae9.bbr01.eq01.sng02.networklayer.com (50.97.18.198)  35.550 ms  1.999 ms  2.124 ms
 5  50.97.18.169-static.reverse.softlayer.com (50.97.18.169)  174.726 ms  175.484 ms  175.491 ms
 6  po5.bbr01.eq01.dal01.networklayer.com (173.192.18.140)  203.821 ms  203.749 ms  205.803 ms
 7  ae0.dar01.sr01.dal01.networklayer.com (173.192.18.253)  306.755 ms
    ae0.dar01.sr01.dal01.networklayer.com (173.192.18.211)  208.669 ms  203.127 ms
 8  po1.slr01.sr01.dal01.networklayer.com (66.228.118.138)  203.518 ms
    po2.slr01.sr01.dal01.networklayer.com (66.228.118.142)  305.534 ms
    po1.slr01.sr01.dal01.networklayer.com (66.228.118.138)  204.150 ms
 9  * * *

After the Singapore data center launch, the number of hops was reduced by 50 percent, and the response time (in milliseconds) was reduced by 40 percent. Those are pretty impressive numbers from just lighting up a couple PoPs and a data center, and that was just the beginning of our global expansion in 2012.

That’s why we are so excited to announce the three new data centers launching this month: Mexico City, Tokyo, and Frankfurt.



Of course, this is great news for customers who require data residency in Mexico, Japan, and Germany. And yes, these new locations provide additional in-region redundancy within APAC, EMEA, and the Americas. But even customers without servers in these new facilities have reason to celebrate: Our global network backbone is expanding, so users in these markets will see even better network stability and speed to servers in every other SoftLayer data center around the world!

-JRL

December 15, 2014

SoftLayer in 2014

As 2014 comes to a close, we’re reflecting on another exciting year: our proudest moments, smartest innovations, and continued growth. It’s been an incredible year being part of IBM, and we continue to broaden our reach while adding new capabilities to our portfolio of cloud services.

SoftLayer’s IaaS platform has become the centerpiece of IBM’s cloud portfolio, providing a scalable, secure base for the global delivery of IBM’s cloud services, spanning extensive middleware and SaaS solutions. IBM has either built or bought 100 cloud properties over the last five years, and SoftLayer is the foundation or the piece that brings it all together.

Expanding our Global Footprint
In January, IBM announced its $1.2 billion commitment to expand its global cloud footprint, including plans to open 15 new SoftLayer data centers. Our first data center to open in 2014 was in Hong Kong, followed by London, Toronto, Melbourne, and Paris, with more to follow. We also launched two data centers for U.S. government workloads in Ashburn, Virginia and one in Dallas, Texas. These data centers are reserved for government customers and will be certified for U.S. Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) and Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) compliance.

With our new international facilities, we’ve tripled our footprint in Europe and Asia. Expanding our physical presence in these geographies gives our customers SoftLayer solutions for workloads and data that need to remain local, while providing additional data redundancy options within key regions around the world. With our data centers and points of presence (PoPs) combined, SoftLayer is on track for world domination.

Read more:
+IBM Commits $1.2 Billion to Expand Global Cloud Footprint

Hourly Bare Metal
Our bare metal cloud differentiates us by providing an ideal solution for the toughest workloads in the cloud, including big data and analytics that require high performance. For more than 10 years, we’ve been refining, pioneering, and innovating our bare metal cloud. This year we unveiled a new offering: new bare metal servers that are deployed in less than 30 minutes and billed by the hour. These hourly bare metal servers provide the raw performance of physical servers with shorter commitments, making it easier than ever to deploy computing-intensive workloads on SoftLayer at will.

Read more:
+Hourly Bare Metal

Growth
In 2014, we’ve continued to experience incredible growth. Since being acquired by IBM, SoftLayer has added thousands of new customers at an average rate of 1,000 new accounts per month. To match our aggressive business growth, our employee base is expanding as well.

“We expected to almost double this year, and to almost double again next year," said SoftLayer COO Francisco Romero. “In Dallas, SoftLayer expects to hire workers to fill 250 new jobs by the end of 2015.”

In order to accommodate our growing employee population, we’ll be relocating our Dallas headquarters to a new space early next year.

We look forward to serving you from our new address, 14001 North Dallas Parkway.

Read more:
+SoftLayer to Double Its Dallas Headquarters

-@quigleymar

September 18, 2014

The Cloud Doesn't Bite, Part III

Why it's OK to be a server-hugger—a cloud server hugger.

(This is the final post in a three-part series. Read the first and second posts here.)

By now, you probably understand the cloud enough to know what it is and does. Maybe it's something you've even considered for your own business. But you're still not sold. You still have nagging concerns. You still have questions that you wish you could ask, but you're pretty sure no cloud company would dignify those questions with an honest, legitimate response.

Well we’re a cloud company, and we’ll answer those questions.

Inspired by a highly illuminating (!) thread on Slashdot about the video embedded below, we've noticed that some of you aren't ready to get your head caught up in the cloud just yet. And that's cool. But let's see if maybe we can put a few of those fears to rest right now.

“[The] reason that companies are hesitant to commit all of their IT to the cloud [relates to] keeping control. It's not about jobs, it's about being sure that critical services are available when you need them. Whenever you see ‘in the CLOUD!’, mentally replace it with ‘using someone else's server’—all of a sudden it looks a whole lot less appealing. Yes, you gain some flexibility, but you lose a LOT of control. I like my data to not be in the hands of someone else. If I don't control the actual machine that has my data on it, then I don't control the data.”

You guys are control FREAKS! And rightfully so. But some of us actually don't take that away from you. Believe it or not, we make it easier for you.

In fact, sometimes you even get to manage your own infrastructure—and that means you can do anything an employee can do. You'll probably even get so good at it that you'll wonder why we don't pay you.

But it doesn't stop at mere management. Oh, no, no, no, friends. You can even take it one further and build, manage, and have total control over your very own private cloud of virtual servers. Yes, yours, and yours only. Now announcing you, the shot caller.

The point is, you don't lose control over your data in the cloud. None. 'Cause cloud companies don't play like that.

“The first rule of computer security is physical access, which is impossible with cloud services, which means they are inherently insecure.”

Curious. So since you can't physically touch your money in your bank account, does that mean it's a free-for-all on your savings? Let us know; we'll bring buckets.

“These cloud guys always forget to mention one glaring problem with their model— they're not adding any new software to the picture.”

Ready for us to blow your minds? We're actually adding software all the time; you just don't see it—but you do feel it.

Your friendly Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) providers out there are doing a lot of development behind the scenes. An internal software update might let us deploy servers 10 minutes faster, for example. You won't see that, but that doesn't mean it's not happening. If you're happy with your servers, then rest assured you're seeing some sweet software in action. Some cloud companies aren't exclusively focused on software (think Salesforce), but that doesn't mean the software is dial-up grade.

“I personally don't trust the cloud. Think about it for a moment. You are putting your data on a server, and you have no clue as to where it is. You have no clue about who else is able to see that data, and you have no clue about who is watching as you access your data and probably no clue if that server is up to date on security patches.”

Just ask. Simply ask all these questions, and you'd have all these answers. Not to be cheeky, but all of this is information you can and do have a right to know before you commit to anything. We're not sure what makes you think you don't, but you do. Your own due diligence on behalf of your data makes that a necessity, not a luxury.

“As long as I'm accountable, I want the hardware and software under my control. That way when something goes wrong and my boss calls and asks 'WTF?', I can give him something more than ’Well I called Amazon and left a message with our account representative.’"

We can't speak for Amazon, but cloud companies often offer multiple ways you can get a hold of a real, live person because we get that you want to talk to us, like, yesterday. Yes, we totally get you. And we want to fix whatever ails you. In the cloud, that is.

But what makes you think we won't know when something goes wrong before you do? (Checkmate.)

“No matter how much marketing jargon you spew at people, ‘the cloud’ is still just a bunch of servers. Stop lying.”

Why yes, yes, it is. Who's lying to you about that? You're right. "They" should stop lying.

The concept of "the cloud" is simply about where the servers are located and how you consume computing, storage, and networking resources. In "the cloud," your servers are accessed remotely via a network connection (often the Internet, for most of the clouds you know and love) as opposed to being locally accessed while housed in a server room or physical location on the company premises. Your premises, as in wherever you are while performing your computing functions. But no one's trying to pull the wool over your eyes with that one.

Think about it this way: If servers at your location are "on the ground," then servers away from your location can be considered "in the cloud." And that's all there is to it.

Did we help? Did we clear the cloudy haze? We certainly hope so.

But this is just the beginning, and our door is always open for you to question, criticize, and wax philosophical with us when it comes to all things cloud. So get at us. You can chat with us live via our homepage, message us or post up on Facebook, or sling a tweet at a SLayer. We've got real, live people manning their stations. Consider the gauntlet thrown.

-Fayza

September 9, 2014

Building a Secure Cloud-based Solution: Part I

When you begin a household project, you must first understand what you will need to complete the task. Before you begin, you check your basement or garage to make sure you have the tools to do the work. Building a secure cloud-based solution requires similar planning. You’re in luck—SoftLayer has all the tools needed, including a rapidly maturing set of security products and services to help you build, deploy, and manage your cloud solution. Over the next couple of months, we will take a look at how businesses leverage cloud technologies to deliver new value to their employees and customers, and we’ll discuss how SoftLayer provides the tools necessary to deliver your solutions securely.

Hurricane plan of action: Water: Check. Food: Check. Cloud: Check?

Let’s set the scene here: A hurricane is set to make landfall on the United States’ Gulf Coast, and the IT team at an insurance company must elastically scale its new claim application to accommodate the customers and field agents who will need it in the storm’s aftermath. The team needs to fulfill short-term computing needs and long-term hosting of additional images from the claims application, thereby creating a hybrid cloud environment. The insurance company’s IT staff meet to discuss their security requirements, and together, they identify several high-level needs:

  1. Provide secure connectivity, authentication, access control, and audit capabilities for IT administrators and users.

    SoftLayer provides VPNs, multifactor authentication, audit control logs, API keys, and fine-grained access control. This allows insurance agents to securely access claim forms and supporting documentation and connect to the application via https, using the wide range of SSL certificates (Symantec, Geotrust, and more). Plus, agents can authenticate using identity and access management solutions such as IWS Go Cloud ID and IBM Security Access Manager.
  2. Ensure that stringent data security measures are enforced.

    Data cannot be shifted across borders, and data at rest or in use must be encrypted. SoftLayer leaves data where customers place it, and will never transfer customers’ data. IBM Cloud Marketplace partners like Vormetric offer encryption solutions to ensure sensitive data-at-rest is not stored in clear text, and that customers maintain complete control of the encryption keys. Additionally, the IT team in our example would have the ability to encrypt all sensitive PHI data in database using data-in-use solutions from Eperi.
  3. Ensure multi-layered security for network zone segmentation.

    Users and administrators in the confidential area of insurance need confidence that their network is securely partitioned. SoftLayer native and vendor solutions such as SoftLayer VLANs, Vyatta Gateway, Fortigate firewall, and Citrix Netscaler allow administrators to securely partition a network, creating segmentation according to organizational needs, and providing the routing and filtering needed to isolate users, workloads, and domains.
  4. Enforce host security using anti-virus software, host intrusion prevention systems, and other solutions.

    The IT team can apply best-of-breed third-party solutions, such as Nessus Vulnerability Scanner, McAfee Antivirus, and McAfee Host Intrusion Protection. These capabilities give administrators the means to ensure that infrastructure is protected from malware and other host attacks, enhancing both system availability and performance.
  5. Define and enforce security policies for the hybrid cloud environment, and audit any policy changes.

    Administrators can manage overall policies for the combined public-private environment using IBM solutions like QRadar, Hosted Security Event and Log Management Service, and xForce Threat Analysis Service. Admins can use solutions from vendors like CloudPassage, Sumo Logic, and ObserveIT to automatically define policies around firewall rules, file integrity, security configuration, and access control, and to audit adherence to such policies.

The insurance company’s IT department already knew from SoftLayer’s reputation that it is one of the highest performing cloud infrastructures available, with a wide range of integrated and automated cloud computing options, all through a private network and advanced management system, but now it knows from experience that SoftLayer offers the security solutions needed to get the job done.

When business needs spike and companies need additional capacity, SoftLayer delivers quickly and securely. Stay tuned for Part 2 where we will talk secure development and test activities.

- Rick Hamilton, IBM Cloud Offering Evangelist

August 7, 2014

Deploy or Die

“Forget about being a futurist, become a now-ist.” With those words, Joi Ito, the director of the MIT Media Lab, ends his most recent talk at TED. What thrills me the most is his encouragement to apply agile principles throughout any innovation process, and creating in the moment, building quickly and improving constantly is the story we’ve been advocating at SoftLayer for a long while.

Joi says that this new approach is possible thanks to the Internet. I actually want to take it further. Because the Internet has been around a lot longer than these agile principles, I argue that the real catalyst for the startups and technology disruptors we see nowadays was the widespread, affordable availability of cloud resources. The chance of deploying infrastructure on demand without long-term commitments, anywhere in the world, and with an option to scale it up and down on the fly decreased the cost of innovation dramatically. And fueling that innovation has always been raison d'être of SoftLayer.

Joi compares two innovation models: the before the Internet (I will go ahead and replace “Internet” with “cloud,” which I believe makes the case even stronger) and the new model. The world seemed to be much more structured before the cloud, governed by a certain set of rules and laws. When the cloud happened, it became very complex, low cost, and fast, with Newtonian rules being often defied.

Before, creating something new would cost millions of dollars. The process started with commercial minds, aka MBAs, who’d write a business plan, look for money to support it, and then hire designers and engineers to build the thing. Recently, this MBA-driven model has flipped: first designers and engineers build a thing, then they look for money from VCs or larger organizations, then they write a business plan, and then they move on to hiring MBAs.

A couple of months ago, I started to share this same observation more loudly. In the past, if an organization wanted to bring something new to the market, or just make iteration to the existing offering, it involved a lot of resources, from time, to people, to supporting infrastructure. Only a handful of ideas, after cumbersome fights with processes, budget restrictions, and people (and their egos), got to see the daylight. Change was a luxury.

Nowadays the creators are people who used to be in the shadows, mainly taking instructions from “management” and spinning the hamster wheel they were put on. Now, the “IT crowd” no longer sits in the basements of their offices. They are creating new revenue streams and becoming driving forces within their organizations, or they are rolling out their own businesses as startup founders. There is a whole new breed of technology entrepreneurs thriving on what the cloud offers.

Coming back to the TED talk, Joi brings great examples proving that this new designers/engineers-driven model has pushed innovation to the edges and beyond not only in software development, but also in manufacturing, medicine, and other disciplines. He describes bottom-up innovation as democratic, chaotic, and hard to control, where traditional rules don’t apply anymore. He replaces the demo-or-die motto with a new one: deploy or die, stating that you have to bring something to the real world for it to really count.

He walks us through the principles behind the new way of doing things, and for each of those, without any hesitation, I can add, “and that’s exactly what the cloud enables” as an ending to each statement:

  • Principle 1: Pull Over Push is about pulling the resources from the network as you need them, rather than stocking them in the center and controlling everything. And that’s exactly what the cloud enables.
  • Principle 2: Learning Over Education means drawing conclusions and learning on the go—not from static information, but by experimenting, testing things in real life, playing around with your idea, seeing what comes out of it, and applying the lessons moving forward. And that’s exactly what the cloud enables.
  • Principle 3: Compass Over Maps calls out the high cost of writing a plan or mapping the whole project, as it usually turns out not to be very accurate nor useful in the unpredictable world we live in. It’s better not to plan the whole thing with all the details ahead, but to know the direction you’re headed and leave yourself the freedom of flexibility, to adjust as you go, taking into account the changes resulting from each step. And that’s exactly what the cloud enables.

I dare to say that all the above is the true power of cloud without fluff, leaving you with an easy choice when facing the deploy-or-die dilemma.

- Michalina

July 1, 2014

The Cloud in 100 Years

Today’s cloud is still in its infancy, with less than 10 years under its belt, yet it has produced some of the most advanced products and solutions known to date. Cloud, in fact, has helped change how the world connects by making information, current events, and communication available globally, at the speed of light.

The Internet itself was born in the 1960s and in just 44 years, look at what it has accomplished! Websites like Google, Bing, and Yahoo provide up-to-the-second information that is reinventing and replacing the role dictionaries and encyclopedias once played. Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are revolutionizing how most of the world communicates. WordPress, Tumblr, and bloggers give voices to many journalist and writers who were once only heard by few, if any. It is truly a new landscape today. Do you think when Herman Hollerith thought he invented the punch card in the 1890s that it would evolve data processing to “the cloud” in just 100 years? IBM 100 explains:

One could argue that the information age began with the punch card, and that data processing as a transformational technology began with its 1928 redesign by IBM. This thin piece of cardboard, with 80 columns of tiny rectangular holes made the world quantifiable. It allowed data to be recorded, stored, and analyzed. For nearly 50 years, it remained the primary vehicle for processing the essential facts and figures that comprised countless industries, in every corner of the globe. (IBM 100)

What about the future?

It’s obvious that predicting 10 decades into the future is a difficult task, but one thing is for sure, this cloud thing is just getting started.

  • What will we call it? The Internet/World Wide Web is now almost synonymous with the term cloud. I predict that in the next 20 years it will take on another name. Something even more nebulous than the cloud … maybe even “The Nebula.” Or … quite possibly, Skynet!
  • How will it be accessed? In 100 years, I think the more fitting question will be, “how will you hide from it?” Today, we are voluntarily connected with our smart phones. You can be found and contacted using varying mediums from a single, handheld device. FaceTime, WhatsApp, Skype, Tango … you name it. You can make video calls to people halfway around the world in seconds. If Moore’s law still applies in 100 years, our devices could potentially be 50 times smaller than what they are today.
  • Ultimate Control: Nanotechnology will have the ability to control the weather and not only determine if we will have rain but regulate it. Weather control could rid the world of drought and make uninhabitable areas of the world flourish.
  • Medicine: The term “antibiotics” will take on a whole new meaning for medicine in 100 years. Imagine instead of getting a shot of penicillin, you receive 50mL of microscopic robots that can attack the virus directly, from within. The robots then send a push notification to your ‘iPhone 47S’ notifying you that your flu bug has been located and irradiated and that you can press “OK” to send the final report to your physician. The Magic School Bus finally becomes a reality!

Without a doubt, cloud services will be everywhere in the future. The change is already taking place with early adopters and businesses. In the 10 years since the industry coined the term cloud, it’s become a birthplace for technology and industry disruptive behavior. This has caught the attention of the traditional IT organizations as a way to save capital, lower time to market, and increase research and development on their own products and services.

SoftLayer is dedicated to helping the transformation of mid-market and enterprise companies alike. We understand that the cloud is virtually making this world smaller as companies reach into markets that were once out of reach; which is why we’re in the process of doubling our data center footprint to reach those unreachable areas of the world. Don’t be surprised when we announce our first data center on the moon!

-Harold

Categories: 
April 29, 2014

The Media Industry is Making the Move to Cloud

Rumor has it that at the entire rendering of James Cameron’s “Avatar” using 3DFusion required more than 1 petabyte of storage space. This is equivalent to 500 hard drives of 2 terabytes each, or a 32 year-long MP3 file! The computing power behind this would consist of about 34 racks, each with 4 chassis containing 32 machines. All of that adds up to roughly 40,000 processors and 104 terabytes of RAM.

High-res, long-form media files that can reach hundreds of gigabytes of storage are regular phenomena in the media industry. Whether it’s making the next “Avatar” or creating the next big, viral ad campaign, technology is fundamental to the media industry. But, the investment required to set these up is enough to boggle the mind and dissuade even the high risk-takers. So, why buy when you can rent?

Cloud allows you to rent, own, use, and return the infrastructure with no capex. That gives users access to unlimited compute power, including servers, network, storage, firewalls, and ancillary services, all available on demand, with pay-as-you-go billing offered hourly or monthly.

Cloud services are an increasingly viable avenue for the industry to leverage and support the performance needs of online media storage, as well as collaboration environment. The benefits of a customizable approach to the cloud include: digital archives, production support, broadcast facility resiliency, high-intensity processing, and derivatives manufacturing for transcoding and encrypting. An on-demand, scalable infrastructure is the next step toward reducing production and operations costs, simplifying data access, and delivering content faster to the end user.

This year at ad:tech asean, SoftLayer will present on how the media industry is utilizing cloud infrastructure. So, I thought this would be a good opportunity to share some interesting customer stories about media companies at the top of their games and successfully growing their businesses on the cloud. Here are two of those stories.

The Loft Group, an Australian creative digital agency, specializes in creating e-learning campaigns for global brands. The company won a contract with cosmetics giant L’Oreal but realized that in order to go big with their platform, they needed technology that provided their support team with the necessary analytics. The Loft Group selected SoftLayer as the cloud platform for its digital e-learning campaigns. Moving their services to the cloud helped the company achieve global scale, consistent performance across multiple countries and grow at a pace which slashed a 3- to 5-year transformation timeline down to just months.

According to eMarketer’s forecast, global e-commerce sales will top $1.2 trillion by 2016. That growth is projected to continue by 20 percent every year. Ad personalization is playing a larger part in maximizing e-commerce business. To keep up with the demands of real-time ad personalization, companies like Struq, an ad personalization platform, require an infrastructure that can process high volumes at high speeds.

Struq offers highly targeted ad campaigns across a range of promotional platforms. The company often handles more than 2 terabytes of raw event data every day, processing more than 95 percent of requests in fewer than 30 milliseconds. And when the company’s growing European customer base demanded immediate server allocation, Struq turned to SoftLayer for scalability. We were able to offer on-demand provisioning as well as the low latency their customers required. A detailed story of how Struq achieved the requisite scalability and success with SoftLayer is available here.

More stories to come, so stay tuned! In the meantime, you can hear more customer stories during the first leg of ad:tech asean, a prelim roadshow in Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur and Bangkok.

-@namrata_kapur

February 6, 2014

Building a Bridge to the OpenStack API

OpenStack is experiencing explosive growth in the cloud market. With more than 200 companies contributing code to the source and new installations coming online every day, OpenStack is pushing hard to become a global standard for cloud computing. Dozens of useful tools and software products have been developed using the OpenStack API, so a growing community of administrators, developers and IT organizations have access to easy-to-use, powerful cloud resources. This kind of OpenStack integration is great for users on a full OpenStack cloud, but it introduces a challenge to providers and users on other cloud platforms: Should we consider deploying or moving to an OpenStack environment to take advantage of these tools?

If a cloud provider spends years developing a unique platform with a proprietary API, implementing native support for the OpenStack API or deploying a full OpenStack solution may be cost prohibitive, even with significant customer and market demand. The provider can either bite the bullet to implement OpenStack compatibility, hope that a third party library like libclouds or fog is updated to support its API, or choose to go it alone and develop an ecosystem of products around its own API.

Introducing Jumpgate

When we were faced with this situation at SoftLayer, we chose a fourth option. We wanted to make the process of creating an OpenStack-compatible API simpler and more modular. That's where Jumpgate was born. Jumpgate is a middleware that acts as a compatibility layer between the OpenStack API and a provider's proprietary API. Externally, it exposes endpoints that adhere to OpenStack's published and accepted API specification, which it then translates into the provider's API using a series of drivers. Think of it as a mechanism to enable passing from one realm/space into another — like the jumpgates featured in science fiction works.

Connection

How Jumpgate Works
Let's take a look at a high-level example: When you want to create a new virtual instance on OpenStack, you might use the Horizon dashboard or the Nova command line client. When you issue the request, the tool first makes a REST call to a Keystone endpoint for authentication, which returns an authorization token. The client then makes another REST call to a Nova endpoint, which manages the computing instances, to create the actual virtual instance. Nova may then make calls to other tools within the cluster for networking (Quantum), image information (Glance), block storage (Cinder), or more. In addition, your client may also send requests directly to some of these endpoints to query for status updates, information about available resources, and so on.

With Jumpgate, your tool first hits the Jumpgate middleware, which exposes a Keystone endpoint. Jumpgate takes the request, breaks it apart into its relevant pieces, then loads up your provider's appropriate API driver. Next, Jumpgate reformats your request into a form that the driver supports and sends it to the provider's API endpoint. Once the response comes back, Jumpgate again uses the driver to break apart the proprietary API response, reformats it into an OpenStack compatible JSON payload, and sends it back to your client. The result is that you interact with an OpenStack-compatible API, and your cloud provider processes those interactions on their own backend infrastructure.

Internally, Jumpgate is a lightweight middleware built in Python using the Falcon Framework. It provides endpoints for nearly every documented OpenStack API call and allows drivers to attach handlers to these endpoints. This modular approach allows providers to implement only the endpoints that are of the highest importance, rolling out OpenStack API compatibility in stages rather than in one monumental effort. Since it sits alongside the provider's existing API, Jumpgate provides a new API interface without risking the stability already provided by the existing API. It's a value-add service that increases customer satisfaction without a huge increase in cost. Once full implementations is finished, a provider with a proprietary cloud platform can benefit from and offer all the tools that are developed to work with the OpenStack API.

Jumpgate allows providers to test the proper OpenStack compatibility of their drivers by leveraging the OpenStack Tempest test suite. With these tests, developers run the full suite of calls used by OpenStack itself, highlighting edge cases or gaps in functionality. We've even included a helper script that allows Tempest to only run a subset of tests rather than the entire suite to assist with a staged rollout.

Current Development
Jumpgate is currently in an early alpha stage. We've built the compatibility framework itself and started on the SoftLayer drivers as a reference. So far, we've implemented key endpoints within Nova (computing instances), Keystone (identification and authorization), and Glance (image management) to get most of the basic functionality within Horizon (the web dashboard) working. We've heard that several groups outside SoftLayer are successfully using Jumpgate to drive products like Trove and Heat directly on SoftLayer, which is exciting and shows that we're well beyond the "proof of concept" stage. That being said, there's still a lot of work to be done.

We chose to develop Jumpgate in the open with a tool set that would be familiar to developers working with OpenStack. We're excited to debut this project for the broader OpenStack community, and we're accepting pull requests if you're interested in contributing. Making more clouds compatible with the OpenStack API is important and shouldn’t be an individual undertaking. If you're interested in learning more or contributing, head over to our in-flight project page on GitHub: SoftLayer Jumpgate. There, you'll find everything you need to get started along with the updates to our repository. We encourage everyone to contribute code or drivers ... or even just open issues with feature requests. The more community involvement we get, the better.

-Nathan

Categories: 
January 31, 2014

Simplified OpenStack Deployment on SoftLayer

"What is SoftLayer doing with OpenStack?" I can't even begin to count the number of times I've been asked that question over the last few years. In response, I'll usually explain how we've built our object storage platform on top of OpenStack Swift, or I'll give a few examples of how our customers have used SoftLayer infrastructure to build and scale their own OpenStack environments. Our virtual and bare metal cloud servers provide a powerful and flexible foundation for any OpenStack deployment, and our unique three-tiered network integrates perfectly with OpenStack's Compute and Network node architecture, so it's high time we make it easier to build an OpenStack environment on SoftLayer infrastructure.

To streamline and simplify OpenStack deployment for the open source community, we've published Opscode Chef recipes for both OpenStack Grizzly and OpenStack Havana on GitHub: SoftLayer Chef-Openstack. With Chef and SoftLayer, your own OpenStack cloud is a cookbook away. These recipes were designed with the needs of growth and scalability in mind. Let's take a deeper look into what exactly that means.

OpenStack has adopted a three-node design whereby a controller, compute, and network node make up its architecture:

OpenStack Architecture on SoftLayer

Looking more closely at any one node reveal the services it provides. Scaling the infrastructure beyond a few dozen nodes, using this model, could create bottlenecks in services such as your block store, OpenStack Cinder, and image store, OpenStack Glance, since they are traditionally located on the controller node. Infrastructure requirements change from service to service as well. For example OpenStack Neutron, the networking service, does not need much disk I/O while the Cinder storage service might heavily rely on a node's hard disk. Our cookbook allows you to choose how and where to deploy the services, and it even lets you break apart the MySQL backend to further improve platform performance.

Quick Start: Local Demo Environment

To make it easy to get started, we've created a rapid prototype and sandbox script for use with Vagrant and Virtual Box. With Vagrant, you can easily spin up a demo environment of Chef Server and OpenStack in about 15 minutes on moderately good laptops or desktops. Check it out here. This demo environment is an all-in-one installation of our Chef OpenStack deployment. It also installs a basic Chef server as a sandbox to help you see how the SoftLayer recipes were deployed.

Creating a Custom OpenStack Deployment

The thee-node OpenStack model does well in small scale and meets the needs of many consumers; however, control and customizability are the tenants for the design of the SoftLayer OpenStack Chef cookbook. In our model, you have full control over the configuration and location of eleven different components in your deployed environment:

Our Chef recipes will take care of populating the configuration files with the necessary information so you won't have to. When deploying, you merely add the role for the matching service to a hardware or virtual server node, and Chef will deploy the service to it with all the configuration done automatically, including adding multiple Neutron, Nova, and Cinder nodes. This approach allows you to tailor the needs of each service to the hardware it will be deployed to--you might put your Neutron hardware node on a server with 10-gigabit network interfaces and configure your Cinder hardware node with RAID 1+0 15k SAS drives.

OpenStack is a fast growing project for the implementation of IaaS in public and private clouds, but its deployment and configuration can be overwhelming. We created this cookbook to make the process of deploying a full OpenStack environment on SoftLayer quick and straightforward. With the simple configuration of eleven Chef roles, your OpenStack cloud can be deployed onto as little as one node and scaled up to many as hundreds (or thousands).

To follow this project, visit SoftLayer on GitHub. Check out some of our other projects on GitHub, and let us know if you need any help or want to contribute.

-@marcalanjones

January 17, 2014

What's Next? $1.2 Billion Investment. 15 New Data Centers.

SoftLayer was founded in a living room on May 5, 2005. We bootstrapped our vision of becoming the de facto platform for cloud computing by maxing out our credit cards and draining our savings accounts. Over the course of eight years, we built a unique global offering, and in the middle of last year, our long-term vision was validated (and supercharged) by IBM.

When I posted about IBM acquiring SoftLayer last June, I explained that becoming part of IBM "will enable us to continue doing what we've done since 2005, but on an even bigger scale and with greater opportunities." To give you an idea of what "bigger scale" and "greater opportunities" look like, I need only direct you to today's press release: IBM Commits $1.2 Billion to Expand Global Cloud Footprint.

IBM Cloud Investment

It took us the better part of a decade to build a worldwide network of 13 data centers. As part of IBM, we'll more than double our data center footprint in a fraction of that time. In 2006, we were making big moves when we built facilities on the East and West coasts of the United States. Now, we're expanding into places like China, Hong Kong, London, Japan, India, Canada and Mexico City. We had a handful of founders pushing for SoftLayer's success, and now we've got 430,000+ IBM peers to help us reach our goal. This is a whole new ballgame.

The most important overarching story about this planned expansion is what each new facility will mean for our customers. When any cloud provider builds a data center in a new location, it's great news for customers and users in that geographic region: Content in that facility will be geographically closer to them, and they'll see lower pings and better performance from that data center. When SoftLayer builds a data center in a new location, customers and users in that geographic region see performance improvements from *all* of our data centers. The new facility serves as an on-ramp to our global network, so content on any server in any of our data centers can be accessed faster. To help illustrate that point, let's look at a specific example:

If you're in India, and you want to access content from a SoftLayer server in Singapore, you'll traverse the public Internet to reach our network, and the content will traverse the public Internet to get back to you. Third-party peering and transit providers pass the content to/from our network and your ISP, and you'll get the content you requested.

When we add a SoftLayer data center in India, you'll obviously access servers in that facility much more quickly, and when you want content from a server in our Singapore data center, you'll be routed through that new data center's network point of presence in India so that the long haul from India to Singapore will happen entirely on the private network we control and optimize.

Users around the world will have faster, more reliable access to servers in every other SoftLayer data center because we're bringing our network to their front doors. When you combine that kind connectivity and access with our unique hybrid offering of powerful bare metal servers and scalable virtual server instances, it's easy to see how IBM, the most powerful technology company of the last 100 years, is positioned to remain the most powerful technology company in the world for the next century.

Now it's time to get to work.

-@lavosby

Subscribe to cloud