Posts Tagged 'Control Panel'

May 2, 2014

Keyboard Shortcuts in the SoftLayer Customer Portal

I’m excited to introduce a new feature in the SoftLayer customer portal: Keyboard shortcuts!

Keyboard shortcuts give you quick access to the most commonly used features by simply typing a few characters. For those who prefer never having to reach for the mouse to navigate an application, you should find these handy additions quite helpful.

After you log into the Customer Portal, type “?” (shift + forward slash) on any page, and you'll see a full list of available keyboard shortcuts:

Keyboard Shortcuts

On the Keyboard Shortcuts help page, you have the option to enable or disable the functionality based on your preference. Keyboard shortcuts are enabled by default. Disabling this feature will turn off all keyboard shortcuts except the “?” shortcut so that you can access the enable/disable feature preference in the future if you change your mind. This preference is stored in a cookie in your browser, so changing computers or deleting your cookie will re-enable the feature.

The shortcuts are grouped into three sets: Global, Tabs, and Grids.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Global Navigation

You have the ability to navigate to any page in our application by typing in the respective position number in the menu combined with dashes (-). For example, typing 1-5-2 will open Support (1) > Help (5) > Portal Tour (2).

Use the “go to” key combinations to jump to a new location from anywhere in the portal. For example, type (g) and (d) to visit the Device List. Typing (g) and (u) allows you to access the list of portal users, and (g) and (t) takes you to view tickets. If you want to add a new ticket from anywhere in the portal, type (+) and (t). It’s that simple.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Tabs

Many of the pages within the portal have tabs that appear just above the main content of the page. These tabs often allow content to be filtered, or provide access to additional features related to the page topic. Each tab can be accessed by using a simple two-keystroke combination, such as (t) then (f) to reveal the Filter tab on the page.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Grids

Whenever a page contains a grid — a tabular listing — you can now perform common operations from the keyboard. Jump quickly from page to page (first/last or next/previous) or refresh the grid contents with a single keystroke.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Please give this new feature a try for yourself! We welcome your feedback. Please let us know if you would like to have us implement any other keyboard shortcuts in the future.

-Daniel

August 15, 2011

UNIX Sysadmin Boot Camp: bash

Welcome back to UNIX Sysadmin Boot Camp. You've had a few days to get some reps in accessing your server via SSH, so it's about time we add some weight to your exercise by teaching you some of the tools you will be using regularly to manage your server.

As we mentioned earlier in this series, customers with control panels from cPanel and Parallels might be tempted to rely solely on those graphical interfaces. They are much more user-friendly in terms of performing routine server administration tasks, but at some point, you might need to get down and dirty on the command line. It's almost inevitable. This is where you'll use bash commands.

Here are some of the top 10 essential commands you should get to know and remember in bash. Click any of the commands to go to its official "manual" page.

  1. man – This command provides a manual of other bash commands. Want more info on a command? Type man commandname, and you'll get more information about "commandname" than you probably wanted to know. It's extremely useful if you need a quick reference for a command, and it's often much more detailed and readable than a simple --help or --h extension.
  2. ls – This command lets you list results. I showed you an example of this above, but the amount of options that are available to you with this command are worth looking into. Using the "manual" command above, run man ls and check out the possibilities. For example, if you're in /etc, running ls -l /etc will get you a slightly more detailed list. My most commonly used list command is ls -hal. Pop quiz for you (where you can test your man skills): What does the -hal mean?
  3. cd – This command lets you change directories. Want to go to /etc/? cd /etc/ will take you there. Want to jump back a directory? cd .. does the trick.
  4. mv – This command enables you to move files and folders. The syntax is mv originalpath/to/file newpath/to/file. Simple! There are more options that you can check out with the man command.
  5. rm – This command enables you to remove a file or directory. In the same vein as the mv command, this is one of those basic commands that you just have to know. By running rm filename, you remove the "filename" file.
  6. cp – This command enables you to copy files from one place to another. Want to make a backup of a file before editing it? Run cp origfile.bla origfile.bak, and you have a backup in case your edit of origfile.bla goes horrendously wrong and makes babies cry. The syntax is simply: cp /source /destination. As with the above commands, check out the manual by running man cp for more options.
  7. tar – On its own, tar is a command to group a bunch of files together, uncompressed. These files can then be compressed into .gzip format. The command can be used for creating or extracting, so it may be a good idea to familiarize yourself with the parameters, as you may find yourself using it quite often. For a GUI equivalent, think 7-zip or WinRAR for Windows.
  8. wget – I love the simplicity of this little command. It enables you to "get" or download a target file. Yes, there are options, but all you need is a direct link to a file, and you just pull one of these: wget urlhere. Bam! That file starts downloading. Doesn't matter what kind of file it is, it's downloaded.
  9. top – This handy little binary will give you a live view of memory and CPU usage currently affecting your machine, and is useful for finding out where you need to optimize. It can also help you pinpoint what processes may be causing a slowdown or a load issue.
  10. chmod – This little sucker is vital to make your server both secure and usable, particularly when you're going to be serving for the public like you would with a web server. Combine good usage of permission and iptables, and you have a locked down server

When you understand how to use these tools, you can start to monitor and track what's actually happening on your server. The more you know about your server, the more effective and efficient you can make it. In our next installment, we'll touch on some of the most common server logs and what you can do with the information they provide.

Did I miss any of your "essential" bash commands in my top 10 list? Leave a comment below with your favorites along with a quick explanation of what they do.

-Ryan

June 19, 2009

Self Signed SSL

A customer called up concerned the other day after getting a dire looking warning in Firefox3 regarding a self-signed SSL certificate.

"The certificate is not trusted because it is self signed."

In that case, she was connecting to her Plesk Control Panel and she wondered if it was safe. I figured the explanation might make for a worthwhile blog entry, so here goes.

When you connect to an HTTPS website your browser and the server exchange certificate information which allows them to encrypt the communication session. The certificates can be signed in two ways: by a certificate authority or what is known as self-signed. Either case is just as good from an encryption point of view. Keys are exchanged and data gets encrypted.

So if they are equally good from an encryption point of view why would someone pay for a CA signed certificate? The answer to that comes from the second function of an SSL cert: identity.

A CA signed cert is considered superior because someone (the CA) has said "Yes, the people to whom we've sold this cert have convinced us they are who they say they are". This convincing is sometimes little more than presenting some money to the CA. What makes the browser trust a given CA? That would be its configured store of trusted root certificates. For example, in Firefox3, if you go to Options > Advanced > Encryption and select View Certificates you can see the pre-installed trusted certificates under the Authorities tab. Provided a certificate has a chain of signatures leading back to one of these Authorities then Firefox will accept that it is legitimately signed.

To make the browser completely happy a certificate has to pass the following tests:

1) Valid signature
2) The Common Name needs to match the hostname you're trying to hit
3) The certificate has to be within its valid time period

A self-signed cert can match all of those criteria, provided you configure the browser to accept it as an Authority certificate.

Back to the original question... is it safe to work with a certificate which your browser has flagged as problematic. The answer is yes, if the problem is expected, such as hitting the self-signed cert on a new Plesk installation. Where you should be concerned is if a certificate that SHOULD be good, such as your bank, is causing the browser to complain. In that case further investigation is definitely warranted. It could be just a glitch or misconfiguration. It could also be someone trying to impersonate the target site.

Until next time... go forth and encrypt everything!

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