Posts Tagged 'Creating'

March 7, 2013

Script Clip: HTML5 Audio Player with jQuery Controls

HTML5 and jQuery provide mind-blowing functionality. Projects that would have taken hours of development and hundreds of lines of code a few years ago can now be completed in about the time it'll take you to read this paragraph. If you wanted to add your own audio player on a web page in the past, what would it have involved? Complicated elements? Flash (*shudders*)? It was so complicated that most developers just linked to the audio file, and the user just downloaded the file to play it locally. With HTML5, an embedded, cross-browser audio player can be added to a page with five lines of code, and if you want to get really fancy, you can easily use jQuery to add some custom controls.

If you've read any of my previous blogs, you know that I love when I find little code snippets that make life as a web developer easier. My go-to tools in that pursuit are HTML5 and jQuery, so when I came across this audio player, I knew I had to share. There are some great jQuery plugins to play music files on a web page, but they can be major overkill for a simple application if you have to include comprehensive controls and themes. Sometimes you just want something simple without all of that overhead:

Oooh... Ahhh...

That song — Pop Bounce by SoftLayer's very own Chris Interrante — is written in five simple lines of HTML5 code:

<audio style="width:550px; margin: 0 auto; display:block;" controls>
  <source src="http://cdn.softlayer.com/innerlayer/Interrante-PopBounce.ogg" type="audio/ogg">
  <source src="http://cdn.softlayer.com/innerlayer/Interrante-PopBounce.mp3" type="audio/mpeg">
Your browser does not support the audio element.
</audio>

If IE 9+, Chrome 6+, Firefox 3.6+, Safari 5+ and Opera 10+ would all agree on supported file formats for the <audio> tag, the code snippet would be even smaller. I completely geek out over it every time I look at it and remember the days of yore. As you can see, the HTML5 application has some simple default controls: Play, Pause, Scan to Time, etc. As a developers, I couldn't help but look for a to spice it up a little ... What if we want to fire an event when the user plays, pauses, stops or takes any other action with the audio file? jQuery!

Make sure your jQuery include is in the <head> of your page:

<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.2/jquery.min.js"></script>

Now let's use jQuery to script separate "Play" and "Pause" links ... And let's have those links fire off an alert when they are pressed:

$(document).ready(function(){
  $("#play-button").click(function(){
   $("#audioplayer")[0].play();
   alert('You have played the audio file!');
  })    
 
  $("#pause-button").click(function(){
   $("#audioplayer")[0].pause();
   alert('You have paused the audio file!');
  })    
})

With that script in the <head> as well, the HTML on our page will look like this:

<div class=:"audioplayer">
  <audio id="audioplayer" name="audioplayer" controls loop>
    <source src="http://cdn.softlayer.com/innerlayer/Interrante-PopBounce.ogg" type="audio/ogg">
    <source src="http://cdn.softlayer.com/innerlayer/Interrante-PopBounce.mp3" type="audio/mpeg">
  Your browser does not support the audio element.
  </audio>
 
  <a id="play-button" href="#">Play!</a>
  <a id="pause-button" href="#">Pause!</a>
</div>

Want proof that it works that simply? Boom.

You can theme it any way you like; you can add icons instead of the text ... The world is your oyster. The bonus is that you're using one of the lightest media players on the Internet! If you decide to get brave (or just more awesome), you can explore additional features. You're using jQuery, so your possibilities are nearly limitless. If you want to implement a "Stop" feature (which returns the audio back to the beginning when "Stop" is pressed), you can get creative:

$("#stop-button").click(function(){
    $("#audioplayer")[0].currentTime = 0; // return the audio file back to the beginning
}

If you want to include some volume controls, those can be added in a snap as well:

$("#volumeUp").click(function(){
    $("#audioplayer")[0].volume +=0.1;
}
 
$("#volumeDown").click(function(){
    $("#audioplayer")[0].volume -=0.1;
}

Try it out and let me know what you think. Your homework is to come up with some unique audio player functionality and share it here!

-Cassandra

November 27, 2012

Tips and Tricks - Building a jQuery Plugin (Part 1)

I've written several blogs detailing the use of different jQuery plugins (like Select2, LazyLoad and equalHeights), and in the process, I've noticed an increasing frustration among the development community when it comes to building jQuery plugins. The resources and documentation I've found online have not as clear and easy as they could be, so in my next few posts, I'll break down the process to make jQuery plugin creation simple and straightforward. In this post, we'll cover the basic structure of a plugin and where to insert your own functionality, and in Part 2, we'll pick a simple task and add on to our already-made structure.

Before I go any further, it's probably important to address a question you might be asking yourself: "Why would I want to make my own plugin?" The best reason that comes to my mind is portability. If you've ever created a large-scale project, take a look back into your source code and note how many of the hundreds of lines of jQuery code you could put into a plugin to reuse on a different project. You probably invested a lot of time and energy into that code, so it doesn't make sense to reinvent the wheel if you ever need that functionality again. If that's not enough of a reason for you, I can also tell you that if you develop your own jQuery plugin, you'll level-up in cool points, and the jQuery community will love you.

For this post, let's create a jQuery plugin that simply returns, "This is our awesome plugin!" Our first step involves putting together the basic skeleton used by every plugin:

(function($) {
    $.fn.slPlugin = function() {
 
            // Awesome plugin stuff goes here
    };
}) (jQuery);

This is your template — your starting point. Practice it. Remember it. Love it. The "slPlugin" piece is what I chose to name this plugin. It's best to name your plugin something unique ... I always run a quick Google search to ensure I don't duplicate the name of a plugin I (or someone else) might need to use in a project alongside my plugin. In this case, we're calling the example plugin slPlugin because SoftLayer is awesome, and I like naming my plugins after awesome things. I'll save this code in a file called jquery.slPlugin.js.

Now that we have our plugin's skeleton, let's add some default values for variables:

(function($) {
    $.fn.slPlugin = function(options) {
            var defaults = {
                myVar: "default", // this will be the default value of this var
                anotherVar: 0,
                coolVar: "this is cool",                
            };
            var options = $.extend(defaults, options);
    };
}) (jQuery);

Let's look at the changes we made between the first example and this one. You'll notice that in our second line we added "options" to become $.fn.slPlugin = function(options) {. We do this because our function is now accepting arguments, and we need to let the function know that. The next difference you come across is the var defaults blurb. In this section, we're providing default values for our variables. If you don't define values for a given variable when you call the plugin, these default values will be used.

Now let's have our plugin return the message we want to send:

(function($) {
    $.fn.slPlugin = function(options) {
            var defaults = {
                myVar: "This is", // this will be the default value of this var
                anotherVar: "our awesome",
                coolVar: "plugin!",
            };
            var options = $.extend(defaults, options);
            this.each(function() {
                ourString = myVar + " " + anotherVar + " " + coolVar;
            });
            return ourString;
    };
}) (jQuery);

We've defined our default values for our variables, concatenated our variables and we've added a return under our variable declaration. If our jQuery plugin is included in a project and no values are provided for our variables, slPlugin will return, "This is our awesome plugin!"

It seems rather rudimentary at this point, but we have to crawl before we walk. This introductory post is laying the groundwork of coding a jQuery plugin, and we'll continue building on this example in the next installment of this series. As you've seen with the LazyLoad, equalHeights and Select2, there are much more complicated things we can do with our plugin, and we'll get there. Sneak Preview: In the next installment, we'll be creating and implementing a truncation function for our plugin ... Get excited!

-Cassandra

June 15, 2009

Help Us Help You

Working the System Admin queue in the middle of the night I see lots of different kinds of tickets. One thing that has become clear over the months is that a well formed ticket is a happy ticket and a quickly resolved one. What makes a well-formed ticket? Mostly it is all about information and attention to these few suggestions can do a great deal toward speeding your ticket toward a conclusion.

Category
When you create a ticket you're asked to choose a category for it, such as "Portal Information Question" or "Reboots and Remote Access". Selecting the proper category helps us to triage the tickets. If you're locked out of your server, say due to a firewall configuration, you'd use "Reboots and Remote Access". We have certain guys who are better at CDNLayer tickets, for example, and they will seek out those kind so if you have a CDN question, you'd be best served by using that category. Avoid using Sales and Accounting tickets for technical issues as those end up first in their respective departments and not in support.

Login Information
This one is a bit controversial. I'm going to state straight out... I get that some people don't want us knowing the login information for the server. My personal server at SoftLayer doesn't have up-to-date login information in the portal. I do this knowing that this could slow things down if I ever had to have one of the guys take a look at it while I'm not at work.

If necessary, we can ask for it in the ticket but that can cost you time that we could otherwise be addressing your issue. If you would like us to log into your server for assistance, please provide us with valid login information in the ticket form. Providing up-to-date login credentials will greatly expedite the troubleshooting process and mitigate any potential downtime, but is not a requirement for us to help with issues you may be facing.

Server Identification
If you have multiple servers with us, please make sure to clearly identify the system involved in the issue. If we have a doubt, we're going to stop and ask you, which again can cost you time.

Problem Description
This is really the big one. When typing up the problem description in the ticket please provide as much detail as you can. Each sentence of information about the issue can cut out multiple troubleshooting steps which is going to lead to a faster resolution for you.

Example:

  • Not-so-good: I cannot access my server!
  • Good: I was making adjustments to the Windows 2008 firewall on my server and I denied my home IP of 1.2.3.4 instead of allowing it. Please fix.

The tickets describe the same symptom. I can guarantee though we're going to have the second customer back into his server quicker because we have good information about the situation and can go straight to the source of the problem.

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