Posts Tagged 'Customers'

October 11, 2011

Working on the SoftLayer Dev Team

This post is somewhat of a continuation of a post I made here a little over three years ago: What It's Like to be a Data Center Technician. My career at SoftLayer has been a great journey. We have gone from four thousand customers at the time of my last post to over twenty five thousand, and it's funny to look back at my previous post where I mentioned how SoftLayer Data Center Technicians can perform the job of three different departments in any given ticket ... Well I managed to find another department where I have to include all of the previous jobs plus one!

Recently I took on a new position on the Development Support team. My job is to make sure our customers' and employees' interaction with development is a good one. As my previous post stated, working at SoftLayer in general can be pretty crazy, and the development team is no exception. We work on and release code frequently to keep up with our customers' and employees' demands, and that is where my team comes in.

We schedule and coordinate all of our portal code updates and perform front-line support for any development issues that can be addressed without the necessity for code changes. Our team will jump on and fix everything from the layout of your portal to why your bandwidth graphs aren't showing.

Our largest project as of late is completely new portal (https://beta.softlayer.com/) for our customers. It is the culmination of everything our customers have requested in their management interface, and we really appreciate the feedback we've gotten in our forums, tickets and when we've met customers in person. If you haven't taken the portal beta for a spin yet, take a few minutes to check it out!

SoftLayer Portal

The transition from exclusively providing customer support to supporting both customers and employees has been phenomenal. I've been able to address a lot of the issues I came across when I was a CSA, and the results have been everything I have expected and more. SoftLayer is a well-oiled machine now, and with our global expansion, solid procedures and execution is absolutely necessary. Our customers expect flawless performance, and we strive to deliver it on a daily basis.

One of the old funny tag lines we used was, "Do it faster, Do it better, Do it in Private," and with our latest developments, we'd be remiss if we didn't add, "Do it Worldwide," in there somewhere. If there's anything I can do to help make your customer experience better from a dev standpoint, please let me know!

-Romeo

August 19, 2011

SoftLayer at HostingCon 2011

In my "HostingCon, Here We Come!" blog post, I promised that SoftLayer would be Bigger, Better and Badder at HostingCon 2011, and we made some pretty ambitious plans to be sure that was the case: Six conference panels and speaking sessions, SoftLayer's biggest expo hall presence ever, in-booth presentations about everything from Portal 4 to Social Media, our infamous Server Challenge, and the biggest party in HostingCon history ... Heck, we even let PHIL attend to do some "research" for PHIL's DC. We pulled out all the stops.

Now that the dust has settled and the sunburns have started to heal, I can share a glimpse into SoftLayer's HostingCon experience with anyone who wasn't able to make it to San Diego last week.

HostingCon Expo Hall

When you walked onto the conference floor, you saw SoftLayer, and if you managed to miss our 20'x40' two-story booth or the commotion around it, you were probably in the wrong hall. Each person on our team had a chance to speak with hundreds of attendees, and at the end of every conversation, we gave some swag as parting gifts: Switch balls, foam rockets and limited-edition "Robot" T-shirts:

Robot Shirt

Our in-booth theater was the venue where Marc Jones showed off the private beta of our new Flex Images for dedicated servers, Jeff Reinis talked about how customers can take advantage of our international expansion, Stephen Johnson gave a tour of Portal 4, Kevin Hazard shared some tips and tricks to managing social media, and Phil Jackson dove into the API.

Take a virtual stroll around the conference center with us:

And as you can tell from the pictures, the Server Challenge was a big hit.

The Server Challenge

If you bring a cabinet of servers to a conference full of server geeks, you're going to get some attention. Challenge them to a hardware competition, and you'll be inundated with attendee traffic. If you aren't familiar with the in-booth activity, Kevin's blog about the Server Challenge at OSCON is a perfect place to get your crash course. If you already know all about it (and if you've competed in it), you'll be even more interested in seeing some of the action from the show floor:

At 3:07 in that video, you can see the eventual winner of the HostingCon Server Challenge complete a run on Day 1. His iPad 2-winning time was 1:01.77, and he beat some pretty stiff competition for the title of Server Challenge Champ.

Geeks Gone Wild

Put SoftLayer, cPanel and Resell.biz in a room, and you have a party. Add free drinks, a thousand of our closest friends, The Dan Band and a legendary venue, and you've got yourself the biggest party in HostingCon history:

If you took part in any or all of the above shenanigans, thank you! We owe a great deal of our success at HostingCon to you. Once everyone finally catches up on the sleep they missed last week, we'll get the wheels turning to figure out a way to go even bigger next year in Boston ... Speaking of which, does anyone know where I can get a boat that was in the Boston Harbor on December 16, 1773?

-@gkdog

July 11, 2011

Texas House Bill 1841: Hosting and Taxes

Okay, so you've read the title and passed out already ... but wait – this is good stuff! Well, maybe not "good," but at least it's relevant. The esteemed governor of Texas with the big Texas hair (and aspirations of taking his big hair out of Texas) recently signed House Bill 1841 (HB1841) into law, and that law is significant to many of SoftLayer's customers.

Last year, the Texas Comptroller's Office amended a regulation and stated that the use of a server in Texas was adequate to establish a nexus, so an e-commerce vendor who used a Texas web host was required to collect sales tax from their customers even if the vendor had no other presence in the state of Texas. This amendment immediately created issues for web hosts with data centers in Texas: Why would customers get servers from a host in Texas and have to worry about this tax obligation, when they could do business with another host outside of Texas and not have this obligation?

Well, the Comptroller's Office started to realize the effect of this regulation and began to backpedal and say that they didn't really mean what they said.

HB1841 puts the Texas hosting industry back where it was before the Comptroller made those changes: The use of a server located in Texas without any other presence is not considered a substantial nexus for collecting sales taxes. HB1841 specifically states that "A person whose only activity in this state is conducted as a user of Internet hosting is not engaged in business in this state." Note: You may be wondering if this bill applies to Amazon in Texas, but HB1841 doesn't cover Amazon because they had a physical presence in Texas (albeit one operating under a different affiliate with a different name), requiring them to pay sales taxes.

Our very own Brenk Johnson was involved in the effort to pass HB1841. He attended a couple of committee hearings, and he'll tell you his mere presence got this out of committee and in front of our governor. He is quoted as saying, "I can sit in a meeting with the best of them."

At the risk of making this blog sound like an Academy Awards reception speech, we would like to thank Jeff Clark and the crew over at TechAmerica for helping to get this bill passed. TechAmerica is a technology advocacy group that we recently joined, and they have a cracker-jack lobby group. Our CFO and I were on the verge of hiring a lobbyist for the 2009 Texas session, but we ended up not doing so. Two years later, we decided to go with this industry group, and the verdict is that TechAmerica has been a great investment ... It was also through this group that Lance became a Cloud Commissioner! We also want to thank our competitors over at RackSpace, especially their General Counsel Alan Schoenbaum, for getting us involved and for leading and spearheading the passage of this bill ... What was good for the goose was good for the gander on this one.

Because we are back to where we were a couple of years ago in the definition of nexus with relationship to hosts with data centers in Texas, this was not really a game-changing bill. It was important to clarify and undo the damage caused by the waffling that occurred in the State's Comptroller's Office, so in that sense this was a good bill for the industry. Next session we're going to aim for the game-changer: Margin taxes!

-@badvizsla

May 26, 2011

IPv4 Justification Changes in IMS

When IANA ran out of IPv4 blocks in February, the belts tightened yet another notch in the IPv4 world. Regional registries such as ARIN have changed how they are allocating additional IPv4 blocks to ISPs, including performing more stringent reviews to ensure efficient utilization of current allocations and reducing future allocation sizes to more fairly distribute the remaining addresses. In turn, ISPs such as SoftLayer have to more closely monitor how we assign our IPv4 space to ensure efficient utilization by our customers. In order to maximize this limited resource, we have to make changes to the way customers order and receive additional IPv4 IPs.

Being down the line from ARIN, SoftLayer's networking department has to ensure we abide by all updated ARIN policies when we issue IPv4 addresses from our available pool in order to remain eligible to receive additional resource allocations. In addition to policy compliance, we are also focused on IPv4 conservation methods such as those referenced in RFC2050. Accordingly, we've made improvements to the way that we handle IPv4 requests to better streamline the process of collecting and reviewing usage and justification details.

Every SoftLayer server comes with one public IPv4 address, and until recently was assigned 4 additional IPs (/30) statically routed to that server. Our first step of IP conservation took place earlier this year, when we ceased the practice of automatically assigning the 4 additional IPs, and only issued them by customer request.

As we move forward, were trying to be as transparent with our customers about the IPv4 justification process as we can, so we're letting you know that additional justification requirements have been imposed on all ISPs by ARIN, and the best way we can meet those requirements is to have our customers follow the same guidelines. Being SoftLayer, we're doing what we can to automate and streamline the IPv4 justification process where possible, and are therefore implementing changes in the ordering system. Beginning on June 1, you will now be presented with a brief questionnaire whenever requesting additional IPv4 addresses. We must collect the requester's contact details, number of IPs that are expected to be used immediately and within the next year, as well as a brief description of how the IPs will be used. What happens next depends on the information you have provided as well as the current IP usage on your account: either the request is automatically approved and fulfilled, or a ticket is spawned for additional manual review by one of the folks in our networking team.

When a ticket is spawned for our network folks, we will get back to you within one business day, and let you know whether we need additional details from you in order to consider the request. These manual reviews will take additional time, depending on the size and complexity of request, as well as the quality of information provided. Please be prepared that there will be some cases where we will not be able to approve a request, such as when name-based virtualization can be used for IP conservation, or when services such as SEO, email campaigns, or VPN termination are the intended use for the additional IPv4 addresses.

If you're familiar with SoftLayer's previous method of ordering additional IPv4 addresses, you might feel like we're making you jump through hoops. These "hoops" are not intended to make the process arbitrarily more difficult. Rather, they're being put in place specifically to make sure we're in the best position possible to meet customer demands with our current IPv4 allocations, and get additional allocations from ARIN before they are completely depleted.

The ISPs that have no problems giving away IPv4 addresses right now without more stringent review are also going to be the providers that have the hardest time getting additional IPv4 blocks from ARIN, and therefore will have a hard time fulfilling future customer needs. At SoftLayer we are going by the philosophy that the more cautiously we approach IPv4 depletion by justifying our customers' needs for each IPv4 address, the longer our IPv4 pool will last to meet those needs.

This is a good opportunity to mention IPv6 as the long-term solution for IPv4 address depletion. The sooner that the public Internet becomes fully IPv6-enabled, the better off the resource constraint will become. The SoftLayer network is enabled for IPv6, and you may place an order for 18.4 quintillion free IPv6 addresses for your server via our web portal today!

-Dani

May 23, 2011

Behind SoftLayer's Growth

SoftLayer isn't a publicly traded company, but in the interest of transparency, we do our best to share as much information about the business as we can with our customers. Earlier this week, we released our revenue and operations growth for the first quarter of 2011, and while we're happy to reach so many amazing milestones, we can't take any time to rest on our laurels.

It's no secret that we've gotten to where we are today because our 26,000+ customers trust us with their businesses. We can quantify success with revenue numbers and server counts, but at the end of the day, our business will be successful when we provide a platform for our customers to be successful. The growth of our customer base is a testament to the hard work the team has put in behind the scenes, and it also presents an interesting challenge: We need to continue to meet the needs of 26,000+ different businesses in 140+ countries around the world.

Given the amount of hair-pulling you might encounter by something as simple as setting up dinner with a group of friends, it's a pretty daunting task to incorporate thousands of disparate perspectives in our road map as we move forward, but with that challenge comes great opportunity to build SoftLayer into an even better business. Whether the request is for something as straightforward as a hardware product or as complex as geographic expansion into specific international markets, the feedback we get from our customers shapes our internal conversations (and ultimately our long-term plans).

Understanding that need for constant feedback, we're doing our best to listen to what our customers have to say. We're listening to conversations on our forums, watching updates from our customers on various social media platforms, and monitoring our sales and support customer experiences to ensure we're moving in the right direction. Recently, we incorporated a Get Satisfaction widget on our site to give our customers a platform to share their ideas, questions, problems and praises. Additionally, users can vote on existing suggestions to give us a sense of our customer base's priorities.

To all of our customers, thank you for trusting SoftLayer with your business. In response to your past requests, we've opened a new data center in San Jose, christened new pods in Dallas and Washington, D.C., launched our managed hosting service and released servers powered by the latest and greatest Intel Xeon "Sandy Bridge" and "Westmere EX" processors ... And all of those accomplishments have come since we closed the books on the success we shared from Q1.

As we continue to improve our feedback loops, you're going to see even more impressive numbers from SoftLayer, and that success will fuel our ability to continue growing the business to meet more of our customers' requests. Because we officially completed our integration with The Planet in Q1, we're able to shift our focus completely to maintaining and growing the combined business. By the end of the year, you'll see SoftLayer data centers in Europe and Asia, and as new products and technologies are released, you'll see them first from SoftLayer.

What else can we do for you? (And no, that's not a rhetorical question.)

-@gkdog

April 6, 2011

Take Me Out to the Ball Game

If you didn't read the title to this post in the singsong seventh-inning stretch tune, the rest of this post probably won't be for you. For those of you who just got to "Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack," as the song kept playing in your head, you're going to love the news we have to share. We'll wait for you to finish belting out "At the old ball game!" first, though.

[Pausing here for everyone to finish the song.]

Now that everyone's back together, I want you to make sure you don't lose any of that late-inning adrenaline because you might need it at the end of this post.

SoftLayer is all about customer experience. Just ask Skinman. If you're a SoftLayer employee and you don't have "the customer" in the top slot of your "work priorities" list, you'll either need to update that list quickly or update your résumé. This post isn't about THE SoftLayer customer experience, though ... It's about A SoftLayer customer experience.

THE SoftLayer customer experience is all about automation, efficiency, service and innovation. A SoftLayer customer experience uses the term in a much more general sense: It's any opportunity we have to give back to our customers in the form of events, contests, and in this case, baseball tickets! If you're a SoftLayer customer, you're entitled to more fun than our competitors' customers ... And if that's not in our terms of service, it probably should be. :-)

SoftLayer Baseball

Throughout the 2011 Major League Baseball season, SoftLayer will be giving away tickets to Texas Rangers home games in Arlington, Texas! We're going to keep you guessing about how/when/where we'll be giving them away, but if you keep your eye on the SoftLayer Blog, follow @SoftLayer on Twitter, subscribe to SoftLayerTube on YouTube and "Like" us on Facebook, you'll be the first to hear.

We're pretty sure customers in the DFW area are going to be the most excited, since they can root for the home team, but as the season progresses, the net may be cast significantly wider ... Reaching out to customers in other parts of the country (world?) who love SoftLayer and want to catch a game while they're in town for a data center tour. But let's not get too far ahead of ourselves just yet. Let's give away our first set of tickets!

Texas Rangers v. Anaheim Angels

  • Date: Monday, April 18, 2011
  • Time: 7:05pm
  • Location: Rangers Ballpark in Arlington
  • Seats: 2 - Section 26 (Lower Level, behind Home Plate!)
  • Transportation: You're responsible for transportation to/from the park

How to Enter
Since our first giveaway doesn't include transportation to/from the game, the primary pool of participants will be customers who live within driving distance (or happen to be in the DFW area on April 18). Entry into the competition is simple: Comment on this post about why you love SoftLayer.

When you're entering your email, please use a contact address associated with your SoftLayer account. Submissions will be accepted from now until 10 a.m. CDT on Thursday, April 14, so get to writing! We'll have a quick internal vote for all of the submissions after removing your contact information to obscure on which account goes with which response. If your submission wins, we'll email you on Thursday to arrange for ticket delivery ... You'll have the whole weekend to get excited about the game!

Play Ball!

-@khazard

March 3, 2011

Hosting != Glamorous

Infrastructure. Administration. Interface. Connectivity. Computer Room Air Conditioner. Data Center. Generator. Router.

I know what you're saying to yourself right now: "Hold onto your hat, self ... After that start, this post is going to be wild and crazy!" Actually, you might have literally yawned while reading those words. Why?

Hosting isn't very glamorous.

Go back to that first sentence and substitute exclamation points for each of the periods, then go back and make yourself yawn once between "Interface" and "Connectivity" and then again between "Generator" and "Router." Which one felt more natural? Unless you're on your fifth caffeinated beverage of the day or you happen to work for a hosting provider, the excited response is probably a lot less natural than the sleep-inducing one.

Don't get me wrong ... I'm not insulting hosting. I think it's just hamstrung by terms that reek of lameness to the uninitiated outsider. The closest we've got to an interesting term in the industry is "the cloud," and the industry was so happy about the positive response to that metaphor that everyone started calling everything "cloud" to engender fluffy, happy images in customers' heads. But as Lance said in his Parallels Summit keynote, it has just become a marketing term.

I propose that hosting doesn't need to be glamorous to be awesome. Hosting enables customers to make glamorous things.

In one day on the GDC 2011 expo hall floor, our team has talked to hundreds of attendees that have stopped by SoftLayer's booth (2116) to learn a little more about what SoftLayer does, and I love seeing someone "get it" for the first time. Nine times out of ten, if I'm talking to an attendee without a technical background, a glazed stare will slowly creep across his/her face as I explain a little about private networking and our nationwide MPLS network, but when I start talking about what our customers are doing with those tools, "Eureka!"

One of the most subtle explanations for SoftLayer's monumental growth is that our customers do some amazing things on our platform, and those successes, in turn, legitimize the platform and inspire other customers. Whether the story be about a phenomenally popular social gaming company or a reseller that enables tens of thousands of small businesses to get websites, being able to share a real world example takes our explanation out of the ether ... or maybe it takes the yawn-inducing ether out of our explanation.

SoftLayer's platform was meticulously designed to be spectacularly simple: Make sure everything works together, give customers as much control as possible, and get out of their way to - as Guy Kawasaki puts it - "let a hundred flowers blossom."

If you're at GDC this week and you haven't stopped by SoftLayer's booth yet, you need to listen to Natalie:

When you come by, we'll be happy to tell you anything you want to know about our hosting solutions, but we'll be downright excited to share with you the kinds of things our hosting solutions have done for our customers and could do for you.

-@khazard

P.S. If you're not in San Francisco this week, consider this an open invitation to take us up on the same offer at any of SoftLayer's events in the future.

P.P.S. We sincerely hope that this blog does not offend any "hosters" out there ... especially any that are Warlocks.

November 2, 2010

Don Draper Had it Easy

I was speaking with Softlayer’s PR guy the other day. The topic of conversation was the television show ‘Mad Men’. When I returned to my desk, I couldn’t help thinking that Don Draper had it easy. The advertising and communications game has changed radically since his fictionalized time.

When Don Draper was thinking about making his clients happy in 1964, print, radio, television and billboards comprised the palate that he had to play with. The Internet has changed this in ways Don would struggle to comprehend were he to time travel to 2010. This new palate is virtually endless, essentially combining everything that Don was familiar with, putting it in one place (sort of), and then putting it on steroids.

While Don would have a hard time understanding the internet, he would appreciate the power that it brings, and not only in terms of how he can get his message across. The ability to track who goes where and what they do when they get there has enabled market segmentation far beyond what Don would have ever considered. And because the internet has a little something for everyone, companies are able to market with a greater degree of accuracy.

In theory, we ought to be able to spend less money to reach OUR audience, versus spending more money to hit a broader audience only some of whom are interested in what we do. Theory also dictates that companies ought to be able to measure a real return on this investment. Don would be amazed as this was mostly unheard of in his world - the desire was there, but no one really knew which parts of the budget were delivering results. As the old saying goes “I know that half of what I spend is wasted. I just don’t know which half.”

The advent of ‘social networking’ sites like Facebook or Twitter has made matters more challenging as they change the relationship a company has with its target audience.

First, a company first needs to be attractive enough to merit being followed or ‘friended’. This theoretically means that a captive, receptive audience has self-selected for you. The challenge is in understanding why people show up in the first place.

A Facebook page provides the audience with a profile – this gives the audience context and a reason for adding you as a friend. Twitter is not like this in that in depth profiles do not exist in the same way. On Twitter, the ‘who you are’ element plays itself out over a series of 140 character Tweets. The odd part is that people often ‘follow’ based on a single Tweet, which may or may not be related to what you do. The audience is there, but the intention is often less clear.

While I understand why I follow the people I follow, I confess that there are Tweets that I get from people that I follow for reasons I have long since forgotten. It gets tough to filter things when you are following only 186 people like me, never mind the thousands that some people do. For example, journalist Leo Laporte follows 1,427 people, while English actor / author Stephen Fry follows an astonishing 53,230 people. When you are following that many people, there is not going to be a lot of consistency regarding a decision made to follow. Indeed, the inflow of Tweets is so prodigious that filtering the noise must be next to impossible.

Does that mean that Twitter does not have value as a marketing tool? Don would probably think so, but I don’t. I think that Twitter becomes a valuable tool, but not as a standalone means to reach your customer. If you start to think about Twitter (in combination with a bunch of other stuff) as a means to build community, then I think you are on the right track… I will get to that line of thought later.

-@quigleymar

October 8, 2010

From Zero to Ten in 10

Our second Dallas data center went live 10 days ago and we are already pushing 10 GB of sustainable traffic out the door. I have spent some time in the DC with some of our ops guys, and the place is impressive.

A terrific amount of computing power sits in row after row of server racks, driving a diverse array of business to more than 110 countries. Each rack features powerful processors, lots of RAM and heaps of storage. There is very little that our customers are unable to do over Softlayer’s infrastructure. And if they need more, SoftLayer can add additional servers very quickly to meet this demand. I wish the rest of our business were as simple as this.

Despite the state of the art infrastructure that sits in the DC, it remains a challenge to meet the needs of our customers. Why? Network, that’s why. SoftLayer’s challenge will be to continuously stay ahead of our customers’ demands, primarily in the network. If the network is unable to support the traffic that is pushed across our DC, everything comes tumbling down.

To a degree, we are victims of our own success. As we add servers to racks, we are placing increasing demand on the network. The more successful we are, the more pressure we place on the network.

Consider the following statistics:

  • When SoftLayer went live five years ago, we used two carriers and pushed 20 Gbps out the door.
  • Four years ago, this had gone up to four carriers and eight 10 Gbps links.
  • In January 2009 we pushed about 70 Gbps of sustained traffic. And this doubled for President Obama’s inauguration.
  • Today we use over ten carriers, with over 1000 Gbps of capacity.
  • In addition to the needs that our customers drive, we cannot forget to consider DDOS attacks as DDOS attacks add significant load to the network. We consistently absorb and successfully defend attacks of 5 Gbps, 10 Gbps or more and the peaks have grown by a factor of ten since SoftLayer went live.

The trend revealed is significant – in five years the amount of traffic sustained over our network has increased by more than ten times. And it shows little signs of slowing down.

Suffice to say, we spend a significant amount of time designing our networks to ensure that we are able to handle the traffic loads that are generated – we have to. Aggressively overbuilding the network brings us some short term pain, but if we are going to stay ahead of demand it is simply good business (and it makes sure our customers are happy). The new DC in Dallas is a great example of how we stay ahead of the game.

Each server has 5 NICs – 2 x 1 Gbps (bonded) for the public network, 2 x 1 Gbps (bonded) for the private network and one for management. The net of this is that customers can push 2 Gbps to the internet assuming server processors can handle the load.

-@quigleymar

October 5, 2010

Why Does SoftLayer Rock????

So this blog may be a tad bit delayed, seeing that it is about HostingCon, but better late than never. Right?? During HostingCon, at the SoftLayer Happy Hour, we filmed customers, random followers, and employees to see Why SoftLayer Rocks. Here are the responses we got….

Why Does SoftLayer Rock? Because……

"I get 100% uptime with them and they make sure all my servers are up"

"They offer the best cloud storage in the business"

"They are the ambassadors of the industry and help our business grow"

"My server has never gone down"

Now the most common responses were from the random guests at the Happy Hour. Go figure!

"Cause they throw great parties"

"When you mix alcohol and weapons that could potentially poke an eye out (SoftLayer Rockets)….It’s always in good fun" But… I think the best responses came from the employees….

"Because it is the best company to ever exist" Why is that? "The automation, technology, innovation, and the COO" –Sam Fleitman

"Cause we have a butt ton of cool customers" – Steve Kinman

"The bald guy makes a lot of very cool people happy" –Sean Charnock

There are many reasons Why SoftLayer Rocks and we could ask everyone and will get a different answer. Now if you ask an employee most likely they will eventually mention in their statement "because of me". Here is why I think SoftLayer rocks….

SoftLayer is one of the fastest growing private companies (Inc 500/5000). SoftLayer offers customers everything at their fingers tips, especially now with the iPhone, Blackberry, and Android mobile apps. Besides everything that SoftLayer offers to customers, they are extremely good to their employees. Oh and another reason Why SoftLayer Rocks ‘because of ME!’ :-)

Lets here what more people have to say Why SoftLayer Rocks….Post a comment and tell us!

Subscribe to customers