Posts Tagged 'Data Loss'

August 11, 2014

I PLEB Allegiance to My Data!

As a "techy turned marketing turned social media turned compliance turned security turned management" guy, I have had the pleasure of talking to many different customers over the years and have heard horror stories about data loss, data destruction, and data availability. I have also heard great stories about how to protect data and the differing ways to approach data protection.

On a daily basis, I deal with NIST 800-53 rev.4, PCI, HIPAA, CSA, FFIEC, and SOC controls among many others. I also deal with specific customer security worksheets that ask for information about how we (SoftLayer) protect their data in the cloud.

My first response is always, WE DON’T!

The looks I’ve seen on faces in reaction to that response over the years have been priceless. Not just from customers but from auditors’ faces as well.

  • They ask how we back up customer data. We don’t.
  • They ask how we make it redundant. We don’t.
  • They ask how we make it available 99.99 percent of the time. We don’t.

I have to explain to them that SoftLayer is simply infrastructure as a service (IaaS), and we stop there. All other data planning should be done by the customer. OK, you busted me, we do offer managed services as an additional option. We help the customer using that service to configure and protect their data.

We hear from people about Personal Health Information (PHI), credit card data, government data, banking data, insurance data, proprietary information related to code and data structure, and APIs that should be protected with their lives, etc. What is the one running theme? It’s data. And data is data folks, plain and simple!

Photographers want to protect their pictures, chefs want to protect their recipes, grandparents want to protect the pictures of their grandkids, and the Dallas Cowboys want to protect their playbook (not that it is exciting or anything). Data is data, and it should be protected.

So how do you go about doing that? That's where PLEB, the weird acronym in the title of this post, comes in!

PLEB stands for Physical, Logical, Encryption, Backups.

If you take those four topics into consideration when dealing with any type of data, you can limit the risk associated with data loss, destruction, and availability. Let’s look at the details of the four topics:

  • Physical Security—In a cloud model it is on the shoulders of the cloud service provider (CSP) to meet strict requirements of a regulated workload. Your CSP should have robust physical controls in place. They should be SOC2 audited, and you should request the SOC2 report showing little or no exceptions. Think cameras, guards, key card access, bio access, glass alarms, motion detectors, etc. Some, if not all, of these should make your list of must-haves.
  • Logical Access—This is likely a shared control family when dealing with cloud. If the CSP has a portal that can make changes to your systems and the portal has a permissions engine allowing you to add users, then that portion of logical access is a shared control. First, the CSP should protect its portal permission system, while the customer should protect admin access to the portal by creating new privileged users who can make changes to systems. Second, and just as important, when provisioning you must remove the initial credentials setup and add new, private credentials and restrict access accordingly. Note, that it’s strictly a customer control.
  • Encryption—There are many ways to achieve encryption, both at rest and in transit. For data at rest you can use full disk encryption, virtual disk encryption, file or folder encryption, and/or volume encryption. This is required for many regulated workloads and is a great idea for any type of data with personal value. For public data in transit, you should consider SSL or TLS, depending on your needs. For backend connectivity from your place of business, office, or home into your cloud infrastructure, you should consider a secure VPN tunnel for encryption.
  • Backups—I can’t stress enough that backups are not just the right thing to do, they are essential, especially when using IaaS. You want a copy at the CSP you can use if you need to restore quickly. But, you want another copy in a different location upon the chance of a disaster that WILL be out of your control.

So take the PLEB and mitigate risk related to data loss, data destruction, and data availability. Trust me—you will be glad you did.

-@skinman454

November 21, 2012

Risk Management: The Importance of Redundant Backups

You (should) know the importance of having regular backups of your important data, but to what extent does data need to be backed up to be safe? With a crowbar and shove, thieves broke into my apartment and stole the backups I've used for hundreds of gigabytes of home videos, photo files and archives of past computers. A Dobro RAID enclosure and an external drive used by Apple Time Machine were both stolen, and if I didn't have the originals on my laptop or a redundant offsite backup, I would have lost all of my data. My experience is not uncommon, and it's a perfect example of an often understated principle that everyone should understand: You need redundant backups.

It's pretty simple: You need to back up your data regularly. When you've set up that back up schedule, you should figure out a way to back up your data again. After you've got a couple current backups of your files, you should consider backing up your backups off-site. It seems silly to think of backing up backups, but if anything happens — failed drives, theft, fire, flood, etc. — those backups could be lost forever, and if you've ever lost a significant amount of data due to a hard drive failure or experience like mine, you know that backups are worth their weight in gold.

Admittedly, there is a point of diminishing return when it comes to how much redundancy is needed — it's not worth the time/effort/cost to back up your backups ad infinitum — so here are the best practices I've come up with over the course of my career in the information technology industry:

  • Plan and schedule regular backups to keep your archives current. If your laptop's hard drive dies, having backups from last June probably won't help you as much as backups from last night.
  • Make sure your data exists on three different mediums. It might seem unnecessary, but if you're already being intentional about backing up your information, take it one step further to replicate those backups at least one more time.
  • Something might happen to your easy onsite backups, so it's important to consider off-site backups as well. There are plenty of companies offering secure online backups for home users, and those are generally easy to use (even if they can be a little slow).
  • Check your backups regularly. Having a backup is useless if it's not configured to back up the correct data and running on the correct schedule.
  • RAID is not a backup solution. Yes, RAID can duplicate data across hard drives, but that doesn't mean the data is "backed up" ... If the RAID array fails, all of the hard drives (and all of the data) in the array fail with it.

It's important to note here that "off-site" is a pretty relative term when it comes to backups. Many SoftLayer customers back up a primary drive on their server to a secondary drive on the same server (duplicating the data away from the original drive), and while that's better than nothing, it's also a little risky because it's possible that the server could fail and corrupt both drives. Every backup product SoftLayer offers for customers is off-site relative to the server itself (though it might be in the same facility), so we also make it easy to have your backup in another city or on a different continent.

As I've mentioned already, once you set up your backups, you're not done. You need to check your backups regularly for failures and test them to confirm that you can recover your data quickly in the event of a disaster. Don't just view a file listing. Try extracting files or restore the whole backup archive. If you're able to run a full restore without the pressure of an actual emergency, it'll prove that you're ready for the unexpected ... Like a fire drill for your backups.

Setting up a backup plan doesn't have to be scary or costly. If you don't feel like you could recover quickly after losing your data, spend a little time evaluating ways to make a recovery like that easy. It's crazy, but a big part of "risk management," "disaster recovery" and "business continuity" is simply making sure your data is securely backed up regularly and available to you when you need it.

Plan, prepare, back up.

-Lyndell

December 23, 2011

Back up Your Life: In the Clouds, On the Go

The value of our cloud options here at SoftLayer have never been more noticeable than during the holiday seasons. Such a hectic time of the year can cause a lot of stress ... Stress that can lead to human error on some of your most important projects, data and memories. Such a loss could result in weeks or even years of valuable time and memories gone.

In the past few months, I've gone through two major data-related incidents that I was prepared for, and I can't imagine what I would have done if I didn't have some kind of backups in place. In one instance, my backups were not very current, so I ended up losing two weeks worth of work and data, but every now and then, you hear horror stories of people losing (or having to pay a lot to restore) all of their data. The saddest part about the data loss is that it's so easily preventable these days with prevalent backup storage platforms. For example, SoftLayer's CloudLayer Storage is a reliable, inexpensive place to keep all of your valuable data so you're not up a creek if you corrupt/lose your local versions somehow (like dropping a camera, issuing an incorrect syntax command or simply putting a thumb-drive though the washer).

That last "theoretical" example was in fact was one of the "incidents" I dealt with recently. A very important USB thumb-drive that I keep with me at all times was lost to the evil water machine! Because the security of the data was very important to me, I made sure to keep the drive encrypted in case of loss or theft, but the frequency of my backup schedule was the crack in my otherwise well thought data security and redundancy plan. A thumb drive is probably one of the best examples of items that need an automatic system or ritual to ensure data concurrency. This is a device we carry on us at all times, so it sees many changes in data. If this data is not properly updated in a central (secure and redundant) location, then all of our other efforts to take care of that data are wasted.

My the problem with my "Angel" (the name of the now-washed USB drive) was related to concurrency rather than security, and looking back at my mistake, I see how "The Cloud" would have served as a platform to better improve the way I was protecting my data with both of those point in mind. And that's why my new backups-in-the-cloud practices let me sleep a little more soundly these days.

If you're venturing out to fight the crowds of last-minute holiday shoppers or if you're just enjoying the sights and sounds of the season, be sure your memories and keepsake digital property are part of a well designed SRCD (secure, redundant and concurrent data) structure. Here are a few best practices to keep in mind when setting up your system:

  • Create a frequent back-up schedule
  • Use at least two physically separate devices
  • Follow your back-up schedule strictly
  • Automate everything you can for when you forget to execute on the previous bullet*

*I've used a few different programs (both proprietary and non-proprietary) that allow an automatic back-up to be performed when you plug your "on the go" device into your computer.

I'll keep an eye out for iPhone, Android and Blackberry apps that will allow for automatic transfers to a central location, and I'll put together a fresh blog with some ideas when I find anything interesting and worth your attention.

Have a happy Holidays!

- Jonathan

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