Posts Tagged 'Data Processing'

July 1, 2014

The Cloud in 100 Years

Today’s cloud is still in its infancy, with less than 10 years under its belt, yet it has produced some of the most advanced products and solutions known to date. Cloud, in fact, has helped change how the world connects by making information, current events, and communication available globally, at the speed of light.

The Internet itself was born in the 1960s and in just 44 years, look at what it has accomplished! Websites like Google, Bing, and Yahoo provide up-to-the-second information that is reinventing and replacing the role dictionaries and encyclopedias once played. Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are revolutionizing how most of the world communicates. WordPress, Tumblr, and bloggers give voices to many journalist and writers who were once only heard by few, if any. It is truly a new landscape today. Do you think when Herman Hollerith thought he invented the punch card in the 1890s that it would evolve data processing to “the cloud” in just 100 years? IBM 100 explains:

One could argue that the information age began with the punch card, and that data processing as a transformational technology began with its 1928 redesign by IBM. This thin piece of cardboard, with 80 columns of tiny rectangular holes made the world quantifiable. It allowed data to be recorded, stored, and analyzed. For nearly 50 years, it remained the primary vehicle for processing the essential facts and figures that comprised countless industries, in every corner of the globe. (IBM 100)

What about the future?

It’s obvious that predicting 10 decades into the future is a difficult task, but one thing is for sure, this cloud thing is just getting started.

  • What will we call it? The Internet/World Wide Web is now almost synonymous with the term cloud. I predict that in the next 20 years it will take on another name. Something even more nebulous than the cloud … maybe even “The Nebula.” Or … quite possibly, Skynet!
  • How will it be accessed? In 100 years, I think the more fitting question will be, “how will you hide from it?” Today, we are voluntarily connected with our smart phones. You can be found and contacted using varying mediums from a single, handheld device. FaceTime, WhatsApp, Skype, Tango … you name it. You can make video calls to people halfway around the world in seconds. If Moore’s law still applies in 100 years, our devices could potentially be 50 times smaller than what they are today.
  • Ultimate Control: Nanotechnology will have the ability to control the weather and not only determine if we will have rain but regulate it. Weather control could rid the world of drought and make uninhabitable areas of the world flourish.
  • Medicine: The term “antibiotics” will take on a whole new meaning for medicine in 100 years. Imagine instead of getting a shot of penicillin, you receive 50mL of microscopic robots that can attack the virus directly, from within. The robots then send a push notification to your ‘iPhone 47S’ notifying you that your flu bug has been located and irradiated and that you can press “OK” to send the final report to your physician. The Magic School Bus finally becomes a reality!

Without a doubt, cloud services will be everywhere in the future. The change is already taking place with early adopters and businesses. In the 10 years since the industry coined the term cloud, it’s become a birthplace for technology and industry disruptive behavior. This has caught the attention of the traditional IT organizations as a way to save capital, lower time to market, and increase research and development on their own products and services.

SoftLayer is dedicated to helping the transformation of mid-market and enterprise companies alike. We understand that the cloud is virtually making this world smaller as companies reach into markets that were once out of reach; which is why we’re in the process of doubling our data center footprint to reach those unreachable areas of the world. Don’t be surprised when we announce our first data center on the moon!

-Harold

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