Posts Tagged 'Developers'

August 11, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1, No. 14

The week in review. All the IBM Cloud and SoftLayer headlines in one place.

We’re revving the IBM Cloud engine.
How is SoftLayer helping IBM’s cloud grow? Ed Scannell explores this in a new TechTarget article. He says many of the latest successes are “attributed to the IBM cloud unit's ability to respond faster to market opportunities, along with the ability to build corporate data centers significantly faster than IGS via SoftLayer.”

It’s time to turn to the cloud.
Across the industry, companies are seeing legacy software decreases. In a recent CBR article, James Nunns says he believes the solution could be in the cloud, and he highlights some of the transitions that IBM is making. Steve Robinson, IBM’s general manager of cloud platform services, says, "Today's rapid app development cycles require developers to use new tools and methodologies from across the ecosystem to quickly turn new ideas into enterprise-class cloud applications at consumer scale and innovate at the speed of cloud."

A case for both private and public cloud.
Are you still writing a pros and cons list to compare private and public cloud? It’s time to put the list away. IBMer Philip Guido explains, “Over the next five years, both public and private clouds are expected to grow at the exact same compound annual growth rate.” One thing to remember is that the choice of cloud model is “largely predicated by the business conditions of the industry a company is operating in.”


May 29, 2015

Sydney DC—Since We’ve Launched

It’s been a couple of months since our Sydney data center opened for business, and within this short span we’ve seen a sizable uptake of SoftLayer services—both from existing and new customers in the region. We thought that it was an ideal time to meet these SoftLayer enthusiasts. So, recently SoftLayer CTO Marc Jones, Lead Developer Evangelist Phil Jackson, and a bunch of SLayers visited the city to host workshops, meetups, and a Sydney Launch Party.

Here is a quick snapshot of what went down, Down Under.

≡Developer Workshop at Tank Stream Labs

This year we took the roadshow developer workshops to Australia to celebrate the launch of the Sydney data center (the first round of developer workshops debuted late last year in Asia; read more: Cloud Conversations Ruled at the SoftLayer Asia Roadshow). Led by Phil, the workshop covered managing deployments using the SoftLayer Application Programming Interface (API). The workshop helped developers interact with their accounts, products, and services using direct API calls in a development environment. Phil also answered questions and helped attendees understand, solve, and implement specific ideas in their SoftLayer environments.

≡Sydney Launch Party at the Hotel CBD Fourth Floor

SoftLayer users and enthusiasts came together to join us for an evening of great conversations and excellent music. Marc discussed why SoftLayer selected Sydney for its next data center as well as gave some insight to SoftLayer products and expansion. We spent the evening chatting with our customers and key guys in the startup space.

We’d like to give a shout out to Greg Furlong, CEO & Founder of ChannelPace, David Holmes, CDO of Hostworks, and Jessica Sullivan, Marketing and Business Development Consultant and Founder sbFlourish for taking the time to chat with us. Also, thanks to all those who participated in the workshop and attended the launch party.

I am looking forward to being back in the city with all its amazing restaurants and delicacies, but mostly because it would be amazing to check back with our clients and hear more stories on how SoftLayer services are being used.

–Namrata (Connect with me on LinkedIn or, Twitter)

March 27, 2015

Building “A Thing” at’s Hardware Weekend

Introduction to

Over the weekend in San Francisco, I attended a very cool hackathon put together by the good folks at’s Hardware Weekend is a series of hackathons all over the country designed to bring together people with a passion for building things, give them access to industry mentors, and see what fun and exciting things they come up with in two days. The registration desk was filled with all kinds of hardware modules to be used for whatever project you could dream up—from Intel Edison boards, the Grove Starter Kit, a few other things that I have no idea what they did, and of course, plenty of stickers.

After a delicious breakfast, we heard a variety of potential product pitches by the attendees, then everyone split off into groups to support their favorite ideas and turn them into a reality.

When not hard at work coding, soldering, or wiring up devices, the attendees heard talks from a variety of industry leaders, who shared their struggles and what worked for their products. The founder of gave a great talk on how his company began and where it is today.

Building a thing!
After lunch, Phil Jackson, SoftLayer’s lead technology evangelist, gave an eloquent crash course in SoftLayer and how to get your new thing onto the Internet of Things. Phil and I have a long history in Web development, so we provided answers to many questions on that subject. But when it comes to hardware, we are fairly green. So when we weren't helping teams get into the cloud, we tried our hand at building something ourselves.

We started off with some of the hardware handouts: an Edison board and the Grove Starter Kit. We wanted to complete a project that worked in the same time the rest of the teams had—and showed off some of the power of SoftLayer, too. Our idea was to use the Grove Kit’s heat sensor, display it on the LCD, and post the result to a IBM Cloudant database, which would then be displayed on a SoftLayer server as a live updating graph.

The first day consisted mostly of Googling variations on “Edison getting started,” “read Grove heat sensor,” “write to LCD”, etc. We started off simply, by trying to make an LED blink, which was pretty easy. Making the LED STOP blinking, however, was a bit more challenging. But we eventually figured out how to stop a program from running. We had a lot of trouble getting our project to work in Python, so we eventually admitted defeat and switched to writing node.js code, which was significantly easier (mostly because everything we needed was on stackoverflow).

After we got the general idea of how these little boards worked, our project came together very quickly at the end of Day 2—and not a moment too soon. The second I shouted, “IT WORKS!” it was time for presentations—and for us to give out the lot of Raspberry Pi we brought to some lucky winners.

And, without further ado, we present to you … the winners!


This team wanted to mod out the Hackster’s DeLorean time machine to prevent Biff (or anyone else) from taking it out for a spin. They used a variety of sensors to monitor the DeLorean for any unusual or unauthorized activity, and if all else failed, were prepared to administer a deadly voltage through the steering wheel (represented by harmless LEDs in the demo) to stop the interloper from stealing their time machine. The team has a wonderful write up of the sensors they used, along with the products used to bring everything together.

This was a very energetic team who we hope will use their new Raspberry Pis to keep the space-time continuum clear.


The KegTime project aimed to make us all more responsible drinkers by using an RFID reader to measure alcohol consumption and call Uber for you when you have had enough. They used a SoftLayer server to host all the drinking data, and used it to interact with Uber’s API to call a ride at the appropriate moment. Their demo included a working (and filled) keg with a pretty fancy LED-laden tap, which was very impressive. In recognition of their efforts to make us all more responsible drinkers, we awarded them five Raspberry Pis so they can continue to build cool projects to make the world a better place.

The Future of
Although this is the end of the event in San Francisco, there are many more events coming up in the near future. I will be going to Phoenix next on March 28 and look forward to all the new projects inventors come up with.

Be happy and keep hacking!


March 18, 2015

SoftLayer, Bluemix and OpenStack: A Powerful Combination

Building and deploying applications on SoftLayer with Bluemix, IBM’s Platform as a Service (PaaS), just got a whole lot more powerful. At IBM’s Interconnect, we announced a beta service for deploying OpenStack-based virtual servers within Bluemix. Obviously, the new service is exciting because it brings together the scalable, secure, high-performance infrastructure from SoftLayer with the open, standards-based cloud management platform of OpenStack. But making the new service available via Bluemix presents a particularly unique set of opportunities.

Now Bluemix developers can deploy OpenStack-based virtual servers on SoftLayer or their own private OpenStack cloud in a consistent, developer-friendly manner. Without changing your code, your configuration, or your deployment method, you can launch your application to a local OpenStack cloud on your premises, a private OpenStack cloud you have deployed on SoftLayer bare metal servers, or to SoftLayer virtual servers within Bluemix. For instance, you could instantly fire up a few OpenStack-based virtual servers on SoftLayer to test out your new application. After you have impressed your clients and fully tested everything, you could deploy that application to a local OpenStack cloud in your own data center ̶all from within Bluemix. With Bluemix providing the ability to deploy applications across cloud deployment models, developers can create an infrastructure configuration once and deploy consistently, regardless of the stage of their application development life cycle.

OpenStack-based virtual servers on SoftLayer enable you to manage all of your virtual servers through standard OpenStack APIs and user interfaces, and leverage the tooling, knowledge and process you or your organization have already built out. So the choice is yours: you may fully manage your virtual servers directly from within the Bluemix user interface or choose standard OpenStack interface options such as the Horizon management portal, the OpenStack API or the OpenStack command line interface. For clients who are looking for enterprise-class infrastructure as a service but also wish to avoid getting locked in a vendor’s proprietary interface, our new OpenStack standard access provides clients a new choice.

Providing OpenStack-based virtual servers is just one more (albeit major) step toward our goal of providing even more OpenStack integration with SoftLayer services. For clients looking for enterprise-class Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) available globally and accessible via standard OpenStack interfaces, OpenStack-based virtual servers on SoftLayer provide just what they are looking for.

The beta is open now for you to test deploying and running servers on the new SoftLayer OpenStack public cloud service through Bluemix. You can sign up for a Bluemix 30-day free trial.

- @marcalanjones

March 4, 2015

Docker: Containerization for Software

Before modern-day shipping, packing and transporting different shaped boxes and other oddly shaped items from ships to trucks to warehouses was difficult, inefficient, and cumbersome. That was until the modern day shipping container was introduced to the industry. These containers could easily be stacked and organized onto a cargo ship then easily transferred to a truck where it would be sent on to its final destination. Solomon Hykes, Docker founder and CTO, likens the Docker to the modern-day shipping industry’s solution for shipping goods. Docker utilizes containerization for shipping software.

Docker, an open platform for distributed applications used by developers and system administrators, leverages standard Linux container technologies and some git-inspired image management technology. Users can create containers that have everything they need to run an application just like a virtual server but are much lighter to deploy and manage. Each container has all the binaries it needs including library and middleware, configuration, and activation process. The containers can be moved around [like containers on ships] and executed in any Docker-enabled server.

Container images are built and maintained using deltas, which can be used by several other images. Sharing reduces the overall size and allows for easy image storage in Docker registries [like containers on ships]. Any user with access to the registry can download the image and activate it on any server with a couple of commands. Some organizations have development teams that build the images, which are run by their operations teams.

Docker & SoftLayer

The lightweight containers can be used on both virtual servers and bare metal servers, making Docker a nice fit with a SoftLayer offering. You get all the flexibility of a re-imaged server without the downtime. You can create red-black deployments, and mix hourly and monthly servers, both virtual and bare metal.

While many people share images on the public Docker registry, security-minded organizations will want to create a private registry by leveraging SoftLayer object storage. You can create Docker images for a private registry that will store all its information with object storage. Registries are then easy to create and move to new hosts or between data centers.

Creating a Private Docker Registry on SoftLayer

Use the following information to create a private registry that stores data with SoftLayer object storage. [All the commands below were executed on an Ubuntu 14.04 virtual server on SoftLayer.]

Optional setup step: Change Docker backend storage AuFS

Docker has several options for an image storage backend. The default backend is DeviceMapper. The option was not very stable during the test, failing to start and export images. This step may not be necessary in your specific build depending on updates of the operating system or Docker itself. The solution was to move to Another Union File System (AuFS).
  1. Install the following package to enable AuFS:
    apt-get install linux-image-extra-3.13.0-36-generic
  2. Edit /etc/init/docker.conf, and add the following line or argument:
  3. Restart Docker, and check if the backend was changed:
    service docker restart
    docker info

The command should indicate AuFS is being used. The output should look similar to the following:
Containers: 2
Images: 29
Storage Driver: aufs
Root Dir: /var/lib/docker/aufs
Dirs: 33
Execution Driver: native-0.2
Kernel Version: 3.13.0-36-generic
WARNING: No swap limit support

Step 1: Create image repo

  1. Create the directory registry-os in a work directory.
  2. Create a file named Dockerfile in the registry-os directory. It should contain the following code:
    # start from a registry release known to work
    FROM registry:0.7.3
    # get the swift driver for the registry
    RUN pip install docker-registry-driver-swift==0.0.1
    # SoftLayer uses v1 auth and the sample config doesn't have an option 
    # for it so inject one
    RUN sed -i '91i\    swift_auth_version: _env:OS_AUTH_VERSION' /docker-registry/config/config_sample.yml
  3. Execute the following command from the directory that contains the registry-os directory to build the registry container:
    docker build -t registry-swift:0.7.3 registry-os

Step 2: Start it with your object storage credential

The credentials and container on the object storage must be provided in order to start the registry image. The standard Docker way of doing this is to pass the credentials as environment variables.
docker run -it -d -e SETTINGS_FLAVOR=swift -e 
OS_AUTH_URL='<a href=""></a>'     -e OS_AUTH_VERSION=1     -e
OS_CONTAINER='docker'     -e GUNICORN_WORKERS=8     -p     registry-swift:0.7.3

This example assumes we are storing images in DAL05 on a container called docker. API_USER and API_KEY are the object storage credentials you can obtain from the portal.

Step 3: Push image

An image needs to be pushed to the registry to make sure everything works. The image push involves two steps: tagging an image and pushing it to the registry.
docker tag registry-swift:0.7.3 localhost:5000/registry-swift
docker push localhost:5000/registry-swift

You can ensure that it worked by inspecting the contents of the container in the object storage.

Step 4: Get image

The image can be downloaded once successfully pushed to object storage via the registry by issuing the following command:
docker pull localhost:5000/registry-swift
Images can be downloaded from other servers by replacing localhost with the IP address to the registry server.

Final Considerations

The Docker container can be pushed throughout your infrastructure once you have created your private registry. Failure of the machine that contains the registry can be quickly mitigated by restarting the image on another node. To restart the image, make sure it’s on more than one node in the registry allowing you to leverage the SoftLayer platform and the high durability of object storage.

If you haven’t explored Docker, visit their site, and review the use cases.


November 20, 2014

Beijing Readies for SoftLayer Events

To get in touch with our customers in China, we have planned a series of activities in Beijing. From hands-on workshops to large conferences, we have something for everyone.

Technical Workshop

Riding on the success of our SoftLayer Asia Roadshow in October, we are excited to announce that we are extending the workshop to China. Partnering with e27 and TechNode, we hope to continue helping developers understand the benefits of the cloud and teaching how to make businesses scalable with the SoftLayer environment.

Designed as a half-day workshop with SoftLayer product and technical mentors, attendees will interact with instructors learning how SoftLayer solutions scale and perform the way they do. The greater China roadshow will stop in three cities:

  • Beijing — November 25, 2014
  • Shenzhen — December 11, 2014
  • Taipei — December 18, 2014

Customer Meetups

To wrap up each technical workshops, we invite current SoftLayer customers and business partners to a relaxing evening of cocktails, dinner, music, and socializing. We’ll be sharing exciting news about our upcoming data centers in Asia—you won’t want to miss it!

Dinner is on us, so let us know if you can make it.

Conference Sponsorship

SoftLayer is excited to sponsor two main conferences in Beijing this November. They are:

WHD.Asia 2014
  • The world’s largest series of events for the hosting and cloud service market.
  • November 21, 2014
  • China World Summit Wing Hotel
  • For free registration, use the promo code GCH8BERA.
Big Data & Innovation Analytics Summit
  • Hear innovations from the Asia Pacific's largest gathering of Big Data industry leaders in a fast-growing community.
  • November 27-28
  • Regent Beijing
  • Purchase your pass online here. Use the promo code softlayer20 for a 20% discount.

Drop us a note at if you’re interested in meeting us at any of the above events, and we will provide you more information!

We look forward to welcoming you soon to a great event in Beijing, China.

For all our readers in Asia below you will find the blog in its Chinese translation!

北京一切准备就绪 - 与SoftLayer一起探索!

SoftLayer11月计划在北京将举行一系列市场活动 – 从由浅入深的技术研讨会到大型全球云的会议, 我们都希望有一个活动能适合您!

SoftLayer 亚洲巡演
SoftLayer 亚洲巡演于今年 10 月 1 日在亚洲展开, 很荣幸能与开发者,创业认识一起探索云计算的力量。这次巡演目的是让技术开发人员和小企业理解SoftLayer云架构和好处,以及让了解云能如何使他们的业务迅速发展。我们很高兴宣布这次和e27 以及TechNode,合作, 一起合办大中华地区巡演。

SoftLayer巡演是一个半天的活动,与会者将与导师互动,了解SoftLayer的解决方案, 如何以个人的方式扩展业务及在云上执行其功能。SoftLayer也会分享一些不同行业的成功案例, 如电子商务,社交媒体和移动游戏等等, 将让您了解不同行业以云创业的过程。以下是巡讲城市/日期:

  • 北京站 - 2014年11月25日
  • 深圳站 - 2014年12月11日
  • 台北站 - 2014年12月18日

为了更深入了解客户的需求,SoftLayer在以上城市也邀请SoftLayer客户和业务伙伴一齐聚餐。 与SoftLayer亚太区域主管,以及经验丰富的解决方案专家和客户经理一起轻松共享音乐,聚 餐, 联系不同行业专家!同时, 我们也分享亚洲即将到来的数据中心等令人振奋的消息!请点此了解详情。

与此同时,SoftLayer本月在北京也赞助以下两个会议, 希望届时也能在以下活动与您见面:

  • WHD.china世界主机大会中国站将于11月21日在北京中国国贸大酒店举行 - 您可到官方网站注册时输入该优惠码GCH8BERA便能免费参与本次会议的机会;
  • 大数据和分析创新峰会将于11月27,28日在北京?晶酒店举行 - SoftLayer 客户在网上购票可享有8折优惠,请到官方网站注册输入代码softlayer20。

如有任何疑问,欢迎您电邮到我们的邮箱 查询。


- Winifred Wong (王秋坪)

November 4, 2014

Cloud Conversations Ruled at the SoftLayer Asia Roadshow

Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta, Bangkok, Singapore, & Hong Kong

For those who couldn’t make it to one of the sessions, here are some of the highlights from our Kick aaS five-city SoftLayer whirlwind tour. For the scoop on the entire event, check out the first Asia Roadshow blog.

We met with amazing startups, developers, and entrepreneurs during our technical workshops who were all eager to explore, grow, and exploit cloud computing to its full capacity. We talked about industry best practices and global trending use cases.

It’s so exciting to see the tech community interested in the cloud adoption in Asia and where and how it’s taking today’s businesses!

Tales From #SLAsiaRoadshow

Harold Smith, director of sales engineering at SoftLayer (@Hslmith), kick started the workshops with an introduction to SoftLayer’s cloud infrastructure and business model. He discussed: the security of private clouds, the applicability of auto-scaling, tagging virtual servers, assigning static IPs, moving workloads between onsite servers and SoftLayer environment, and so much more.

Kevin Tan (@s1lve3rd3m0n), CEO, Double Edge Software and Iskandar Reza (@iskandarreza), Cirrus Byte commented that the introduction to the company was an eye opener, and they were glad to get the technical overview of the services, control portal and flexibility offered by SoftLayer cloud.

A chunk of the workshop focused on technical hands-on-training. Phil Jackson, lead developer advocate (@underscorephil), and Chris Gallo, developer community advocate (@allmightspiff), set up attendees with demo accounts to run test scenarios and taught folks how to automate a blog on the cloud.

Casey Lau, Catalyst lead (@casey_lau) and Mic Kwok, sales engineer, also joined us in Hong Kong to discuss how other startups leverage the cloud.

"I am not really a techie, but the presentation, set up of the servers, and login was so nice and easy. I would definitely recommend this workshop and SoftLayer to my startup friends in KL [Kuala Lumpur] and PJ[(Petaling Jaya]."
- @hazimsufyan, a student of IT and business technology

Reaching Out to the Asian Community

One the reasons we planned this workshop series was to help inform the startup and developer communities in Asia about the various cloud models available to deploy their innovative ideas and applications.

"The monthly and hourly packages offered without contracts are amazing as most of us would not want to be tied in long-term contracts."
-@jemhor, a consultant in mobile applications and technology space

"Definitely a good start for those who want to know more about cloud. After these sessions, we can definitely play around, compare various services, and go about building our own cloud."
- Steason Tee, Founder of Freak Lab

Thank You

A big shout out to all who attended #SLAsiaRoadshow and for the interesting discussions had. If you're looking for more dirt on SoftLayer at the Asia Roadshow, take a peek at e27's blog.

Also, thanks for the suggestions on what you would like to see in the next workshop, ideas on what startups would like to see from the cloud industry, and on how SoftLayer can continue building and improving itself. Keep them coming!

For more information on the workshops or to register for upcoming cities, drop us a note at

(Connect with me on LinkedIn or, Twitter)

October 16, 2014

#T4 – Tips and Tricks–jQuery Select2

Who doesn’t like a walk down memory lane? In our #T4 series, SoftLayer brings back popular tech tip blog posts. #ThrowbackThursday #T4 #ThrowbackThursdayTechTips

Creating a drop-down menu? Here’s an abridged version of our Tips and Tricks – jQuery Select2 Plugin post from two years ago tomorrow!

Turn your drop-down menu from this:
Option Select

To this:

Pretty Option Select

  1. Download Select2 and upload it to your server.
  2. Add the jQuery library and scripts to the <head> of the page document:
  3. <script src="jquery.js" type="text/javascript"></script> 
    <script src="select2.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  4. Add Select2's included style sheet:
  5. <link href="select2.css" rel="stylesheet"/>

  6. Before closing the <head> tag, invoke the Select2 function:
  7. <script>
    $(document).ready(function() { $("#selectPretty").select2(); });
  8. Then add the #selectPretty ID to the select element you want to improve:
    <select id="selectPretty">
    <option value="Option1">Option 1</option>
    <option value="Option2">Option 2</option>
    <option value="Option3">Option 3</option>
    <option value="Option4">Option 4</option>

For questions, comments, or just feel like chatting, contact us at


September 17, 2014

SoftLayer Asia Roadshow Kick-starts its 5 City Tour

To help developers understand the benefits of the cloud and how to make their business scalable with the Softlayer environment, SoftLayer, in partnership with e27, is excited to announce the SoftLayer Asia Roadshow. The roadshow will stop in five cities:

  • Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia — October 1, 2014
  • Jakarta, Indonesia — October 3, 2014
  • Hong Kong — October 8, 2014
  • Bangkok, Thailand — October 10, 2014
  • Singapore — October 15, 2014

Designed as a half-day workshop with SoftLayer product and technical mentors, attendees will interact with instructors on how SoftLayer solutions scale and perform the way they do. The team will also take you through real business cases of how technical teams improved their performances in industries such as e-commerce, social media, and mobile gaming.

What you can expect at the workshop:

  • Practical and technical advice that you can apply immediately to help resolve trouble spots and improve performance in your organization’s IT environment
  • Learn how SoftLayer servers are provisioned so that you can build your own public and private node virtual servers
  • Learn and leverage SoftLayer Application Programming Interface (API) to interact with your account, products, and services

Who you will meet:

SoftLayer Road Show


If you are a startup, developer, or an entrepreneur looking to hone your cloud skills then this workshop is for you. Since there are limited seats in each location, visit to register, and the team will get back to you.


January 31, 2014

Simplified OpenStack Deployment on SoftLayer

"What is SoftLayer doing with OpenStack?" I can't even begin to count the number of times I've been asked that question over the last few years. In response, I'll usually explain how we've built our object storage platform on top of OpenStack Swift, or I'll give a few examples of how our customers have used SoftLayer infrastructure to build and scale their own OpenStack environments. Our virtual and bare metal cloud servers provide a powerful and flexible foundation for any OpenStack deployment, and our unique three-tiered network integrates perfectly with OpenStack's Compute and Network node architecture, so it's high time we make it easier to build an OpenStack environment on SoftLayer infrastructure.

To streamline and simplify OpenStack deployment for the open source community, we've published Opscode Chef recipes for both OpenStack Grizzly and OpenStack Havana on GitHub: SoftLayer Chef-Openstack. With Chef and SoftLayer, your own OpenStack cloud is a cookbook away. These recipes were designed with the needs of growth and scalability in mind. Let's take a deeper look into what exactly that means.

OpenStack has adopted a three-node design whereby a controller, compute, and network node make up its architecture:

OpenStack Architecture on SoftLayer

Looking more closely at any one node reveal the services it provides. Scaling the infrastructure beyond a few dozen nodes, using this model, could create bottlenecks in services such as your block store, OpenStack Cinder, and image store, OpenStack Glance, since they are traditionally located on the controller node. Infrastructure requirements change from service to service as well. For example OpenStack Neutron, the networking service, does not need much disk I/O while the Cinder storage service might heavily rely on a node's hard disk. Our cookbook allows you to choose how and where to deploy the services, and it even lets you break apart the MySQL backend to further improve platform performance.

Quick Start: Local Demo Environment

To make it easy to get started, we've created a rapid prototype and sandbox script for use with Vagrant and Virtual Box. With Vagrant, you can easily spin up a demo environment of Chef Server and OpenStack in about 15 minutes on moderately good laptops or desktops. Check it out here. This demo environment is an all-in-one installation of our Chef OpenStack deployment. It also installs a basic Chef server as a sandbox to help you see how the SoftLayer recipes were deployed.

Creating a Custom OpenStack Deployment

The thee-node OpenStack model does well in small scale and meets the needs of many consumers; however, control and customizability are the tenants for the design of the SoftLayer OpenStack Chef cookbook. In our model, you have full control over the configuration and location of eleven different components in your deployed environment:

Our Chef recipes will take care of populating the configuration files with the necessary information so you won't have to. When deploying, you merely add the role for the matching service to a hardware or virtual server node, and Chef will deploy the service to it with all the configuration done automatically, including adding multiple Neutron, Nova, and Cinder nodes. This approach allows you to tailor the needs of each service to the hardware it will be deployed to--you might put your Neutron hardware node on a server with 10-gigabit network interfaces and configure your Cinder hardware node with RAID 1+0 15k SAS drives.

OpenStack is a fast growing project for the implementation of IaaS in public and private clouds, but its deployment and configuration can be overwhelming. We created this cookbook to make the process of deploying a full OpenStack environment on SoftLayer quick and straightforward. With the simple configuration of eleven Chef roles, your OpenStack cloud can be deployed onto as little as one node and scaled up to many as hundreds (or thousands).

To follow this project, visit SoftLayer on GitHub. Check out some of our other projects on GitHub, and let us know if you need any help or want to contribute.


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