Posts Tagged 'Development'

October 20, 2015

What’s in a hypervisor? More than you think

Virtualization has always been a key tenet of enabling cloud-computing services. From the get-go, SoftLayer has offered a variety of options, including Citrix XenServer, Microsoft Hyper-V, and Parallels Cloud Server, just to name a few. It’s all about enabling choice.

But what about VMware—the company that practically pioneered virtualization, making it commonplace?

Well, we have some news to share. SoftLayer has always supported VMware ESX and ESXi—your basic, run-of-the mill hypervisor—but now we’re enabling enterprise customers to run VMware vSphere on our bare metal servers.

This collaboration is significant for SoftLayer and IBM because it gives our customers tremendous flexibility and transparency when moving workloads into the public cloud. Enterprises already familiar with VMware can easily extend their existing on-premises VMware infrastructure into the IBM Cloud with simplified, monthly pricing. This makes transitioning into a hybrid model easier because it results in greater workload mobility and application continuity.

But the real magic happens when you couple our bare metal performance with VMware vSphere. Users can complete live workload migrations between data centers across continents. Users can easily move and implement enterprise applications and disaster recovery solutions across our global network of cloud data centers—with just a few clicks of a mouse. Take a look at this demo and judge for yourself.

What’s in a hypervisor? For some, it’s an on-ramp to the cloud and a way to make hybrid computing a reality. When you pair the flexibility of VMware with our bare metal servers, users get a combination that’s hard to beat.

We’re innovating to help companies make the transition to hybrid cloud, one hypervisor at a time. For more details, visit http://www.softlayer.com/virtualization-options.

-Jack Beech, VP of Business Development

April 27, 2015

Good Documentation: A How-to Guide

As part of my job in Development Support, I write internal technical documentation for employee use only. My department is also the last line of support before a developer is called in for customer support issues, so we manage a lot of the troubleshooting documentation. Some of the documentation I write and use is designed for internal use for my position, but some of it is troubleshooting documents for other job positions within the company. I have a few guidelines that I use to improve the quality of my documentation. These are by no means definitive, but they’re some helpful tips that I’ve picked up over the years.

Readability

I’m sure everyone has met the frustration of reading a long-winded sentence that should have been three separate sentences. Keeping your sentences as short as possible helps ensure that your advice won’t go in one ear and out the other. If you can write things in a simpler way, you should do so. The goal of your documentation is to make your readers smarter.

Avoid phrasing things in a confusing way. A good example of this is how you employ parentheses. Sometimes it is necessary to use them to convey important beneficial tidbits to your readers. If you write something with parentheses in it, and you can’t read it out loud without it sounding confusing, try to re-word it, or run it by someone else.

Good: It should have "limited connectivity" (the computer icon with the exclamation point) or "active" status (the green checkmark) and NOT "retired" (the red X).
Bad: It should have the icon “limited connectivity” (basically the computer icon with the exclamation point that appears in the list) (you can see the “limited connectivity” text if you hover over it) or “active” (the green checkmark) status and NOT the red “retired” X icon.

Ideally, you should use the same formatting for all of your documentation. At the very least, you should make your formatting consistent within your document. All of our transaction troubleshooting documentation at SoftLayer uses a standardized error formatting that is consistent and easy to read. Sometimes it might be necessary to break the convention if readability is improved. For example: Collapsible menus make it hard to search the entire page using ctrl+F, but very often, it makes things more difficult.

And finally, if people continually have a slew of questions, it’s probably time to revise your documentation and make it clearer. If it’s too complex, break it down into simpler terms. Add more examples to help clarify things so that it makes sense to your end reader.

Simplicity

Use bullet points or numbered lists when listing things instead of a paragraph block. I mention this because good formatting saves man-hours. There’s a difference between one person having to search a document for five minutes, versus 100 people having to search a document for five minutes each. That’s over eight man-hours lost. Bullet points are much faster to skim through when you are looking for something specific in the middle of a page somewhere. Avoid the “TL;DR” effect and don’t send your readers a wall of text.

Avoid superfluous information. If you have extra information beyond what is necessary, it can have an adverse effect on your readers. Your document may be the first your readers have read on your topic, so don’t overload them with too much information.

Don’t create duplicate information. If your documentation source is electronic, keep your documentation from repeating information, and just link to it in a central location. If you have the same information in five different places, you’ll have to update it in five different places if something changes.

Break up longer documents into smaller, logical sections. Organize your information first. Figure out headings and main points. If your page seems too long, try to break it down into smaller sections. For example, you might want to separate a troubleshooting section from the product information section. If your troubleshooting section grows too large, consider moving it to its own page.

Thoroughness

Don’t make assumptions about what the users already know. If it wasn’t covered in your basic training when you were hired, consider adding it to the documentation. This is especially important when you are documenting things for your own job position. Don’t leave out important details just because you can remember them offhand. You’re doing yourself a favor as well. Six months from now, you may need to use your documentation and you may not remember those details.

Bad:SSH to the image server and delete the offending RGX folder.
Good:SSH to the image server (imageserver.mycompany.local), and run ls -al /dev/rgx_files/ | grep blah to find the offending RGX folder and then use rm -rf /dev/rgx_files/<folder> to delete it.

Make sure your documentation covers as much ground as possible. Cover every error and every possible scenario that you can think of. Collaborate with other people to identify any areas you may have missed.

Account for errors. Error messages often give very helpful information. The error might be as straightforward as “Error: You have entered an unsupported character: ‘$.’” Make sure to document the cause and fix for it in detail. If there are unsupported characters, it might be a good idea to provide a list of unsupported characters.

If something is confusing, provide a good example. It’s usually pretty easy to identify the pain points—the things you struggle with are probably going to be difficult for your readers as well. Sometimes things can be explained better in an example than they can in a lengthy paragraph. If you were documenting a command, it might be worthwhile to provide a good example first and then break it down and explain it in detail. Images can also be very helpful in getting your point across. In documenting user interfaces, an image can be a much better choice than words. Draw red boxes or arrows to guide the reader on the procedure.

-Mark

January 27, 2015

Hello, IBM Bluemix!

Developers, if you'd prefer to focus on building new applications instead of customizing your own unique cloud infrastructure, IBM Bluemix provides building blocks to rapidly develop and deploy applications on the Platform as a Service (PaaS) level to make life easier for you. It’s an ecosystem of services based on Cloud Foundry, an open source project designed to make deploying and scaling an application as simple as possible. Leveraging an existing project like this is a large part of what makes Bluemix so easy to use.

Bluemix integrates with Jazz, IBM’s DevOps service, to help manage code, plan versions and release, and actually push code to production. You can still use it with your github projects, so no worries there.

And as a SoftLayer customer (or potential customer), you can rest assured that Bluemix projects can run on SoftLayer’s hardware and network.

Core Ideas

The Application
This is your code. Bluemix comes with a number of predefined buildpacks to get your language of choice up and running quickly, but you will still need to actually develop your application. Bluemix hasn’t solved that problem yet.
Buildpacks
A buildpack is a collection of scripts designed to set up your container and all of the application dependencies. If Bluemix doesn’t have a buildpack that suits your needs, you can always create your own. Extending a buildpack is pretty easy. Simply clone an existing one to use as a base, make your changes, commit it to your github repo, and then tell Bluemix about it so it can build your application properly.
Services
Bluemix has a long list of services you can bind to your application. Instead of making a MySQL server yourself, you can just bind the MySQL service to your application and start coding. Along with many of the standard services expected from a CloudFoundry project, there are also some IBM specific ones, like Watson as a service. While I haven’t had the time to learn about Watson personally, everyone I talk to says it’s a rather neat thing to have on your application.

Getting Started

I recommend reading this tutorial which will get you to a nice “hello world” application. Overall I found that going from “I have no idea what Bluemix is” to “I’ve created my own Bluemix application!” to be a rather pleasant experience.

Creating your first Bluemix project is only a few clicks away. A Bluemix 30 day free trial should give you plenty of time to get an idea if Bluemix is the right fit for you.

Bluemix is absolutely worth checking out. So, what are you waiting for? Give it a go!

- Chris

November 6, 2014

#T4 -Tips and Tricks - Pure CSS Sticky Footers

Who doesn’t like a walk down memory lane? In our #T4 series, SoftLayer brings back popular tech tip blog posts. #ThrowbackThursday #T4 #ThrowbackThursdayTechTips

Sticky footers are still landing developers in, well, sticky situations. Don’t fret—we’ve all been there. We’re bumping our popular Tips and Tricks – Pure CSS Sticky Footers blog post that was originally posted two years ago today!

Our objective is simple: Make the footer of our web page stay at the bottom even if the page's content area is shorter than the user's browser window. We got a LOT of feedback the first time this blog was posted, a lot of you loved it, and some of you brought to my attention that some browser environments didn’t support this method.

For this throwback, I have modified the code (the HTML and the CSS), but as you can see, not by too much, only a few things have changed. This method uses the: after attribute, which in my opinion is a LOT cooler. This should help those of you who could not get the previous method to work as this utilizes more of a modern technique and has a lot more universal compatibility!

So enjoy!

Go from this:

CSS Footer

To this:

CSS Footer

  1. Start by getting the HTML structure in place first:
    <div id="page">
     
          <div id="header"> </div>
     
          <div id="main"> </div>
    </div> <!-- /page -->
     
    <div id="footer"> </div>
  2. Then code the CSS for the full page:
    * {
          margin: 0;
     
    html, body {
     
          height: 100%;
    }
  3. Code the rest as:
    #page {
          min-height: 100%;
          margin-bottom: -100px; /* equal to the fixed height of your footer */
    }
     
    #page:after {
          content: “”;
          display:block;
    }
     
     
    #footer, #page:after {
          height: 100px;
    }
  4. For Internet Explorer to not throw a fit, we need concede that IE doesn't recognize min-height as a valid property, so we have to add Height: 100%; to #page:
    #page {
          Min-height: 100%;  /* for all other browsers */
          height: 100%;  /* for IE */
          position:relative;
    }

To read my FAVORITE perk of this trick: check out the original post here.

For questions, comments, or just feel like chatting, contact us at social@softlayer.com.

-Cassandra

October 23, 2014

CSS3 Tips and Tricks – Mastering Multiple Backgrounds

I’ve written a lot of blog posts, some on our very own SoftLayer Development Network, but most of them have been posted right here on SoftLayer’s main blog. One of the most popular is a tutorial I wrote on being able to create a customized background depending on the user’s location. For example: A person visiting a website from the United States during the daytime may see a beautiful yellow background with an orange glow and a bright yellow sun just above the horizon, while a surfer from China may see the same website, but with a dark purple background with subtle white stars and a shimmering moon because it is night. The example I wrote customized the CSS to the time zone based on locale tailoring the site with a more personal touch.

The demand for sites to serve a more interactive experience has always been large in volume, but few websites actually deliver.

Luckily, our Web languages are evolving all of the time, and since I’ve written the “What time is it for you?” blog on our SLDN, more advancements have been made to the background functionality and browser compatibility. This means MORE browsers support these new features, and it’s compliant across the board!

Let’s start off with our usual HTML document (with an addition of an empty div for now, this is where we’re going to master our background techniques).

<html>
<head>
    <title>CSS3 Tips and Tricks – Mastering Multiple Backgrounds</title>
</head>
<body>
    <div class=”slBackgrounds”></div>
</body>
</html>

With CSS3, we can define multiple backgrounds in one declaration, like this:

background: url('earth.png') no-repeat top 30px center, url('star_bg.png') repeat-y center;

By separating each background with just a comma, we’re able to declare many backgrounds for one div. Let’s go ahead and add our multi-background CSS in the <head> of our document:

<style>
    .slBackgrounds {
        width: 300px;
        height: 300px;
        margin: 0 auto;
        background: url('earth.png') no-repeat top 30px center, url('star_bg.png') repeat-y center;
        transition:background-position 600s;
    }
 
    .slBackgrounds:hover {
        background-position: top 30px center, 0px 60000px;
    }
</style>

After adding the CSS styling, you should have something that looks similar to the following:

You’ll notice I added a transition property to the .slBackgrounds class, and I bet you’re wondering why? Everybody has their own learning technique that helps them absorb concepts better and faster than other methods. My learning method (and probably 75 percent of other developers) happens to be the challenge technique: When I learn something new, I think about something extremely fun and challenging that I would like to do with this newfound knowledge beyond just the base use. For instance, why learn how to use multiple backgrounds with CSS3 and just have a five-line blog when we can learn to use multiple backgrounds, AND create an awesome animation sequence that can jazz up the old and boring background system?

Not only does this jazz it up, but by using additions such as the transition and :hover properties, we’re able to open new doors to possibilities with interactivity.

If you haven’t guessed already, the .slBackgrounds:hover section covers what should happen to the .slBackgrounds div when the user hovers over it; in this case, there’s a background-position declaration. The ‘top 30px center’ applies to the first background image, and the ‘0px 60000px’ applies to the second (gotta love multiple backgrounds!).

Go ahead and hover over our images! You should see something like this:

Something pretty simple, but I bet you can already think of a hundred things you can do with the CSS3 multiple background ability, huh? The great news is that the cross-browser compatibility is awesome and supports all newer browsers and most reasonably older ones too! And to think . . . barely five or six years ago it took MUCH more innovative coding and workarounds to achieve results like this without just embedding a flash file or an animated gif!

We’d love to hear how YOU’RE using multiple backgrounds!

- Cassandra

October 16, 2014

#T4 – Tips and Tricks–jQuery Select2

Who doesn’t like a walk down memory lane? In our #T4 series, SoftLayer brings back popular tech tip blog posts. #ThrowbackThursday #T4 #ThrowbackThursdayTechTips

Creating a drop-down menu? Here’s an abridged version of our Tips and Tricks – jQuery Select2 Plugin post from two years ago tomorrow!

Turn your drop-down menu from this:
Option Select

To this:

Pretty Option Select

  1. Download Select2 and upload it to your server.
  2. Add the jQuery library and scripts to the <head> of the page document:
  3. <script src="jquery.js" type="text/javascript"></script> 
    <script src="select2.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
  4. Add Select2's included style sheet:
  5. <link href="select2.css" rel="stylesheet"/>

  6. Before closing the <head> tag, invoke the Select2 function:
  7. <script>
    $(document).ready(function() { $("#selectPretty").select2(); });
    </script>
  8. Then add the #selectPretty ID to the select element you want to improve:
    <select id="selectPretty">
    <option value="Option1">Option 1</option>
    <option value="Option2">Option 2</option>
    <option value="Option3">Option 3</option>
    <option value="Option4">Option 4</option>
    </select>

For questions, comments, or just feel like chatting, contact us at social@softlayer.com.

-Cassandra

September 16, 2014

CSS3 Tips and Tricks – Generated Content Without jQuery

If you guys have read any of my past blogs, you know how much I LOVE jQuery, but every good developer knows that if there’s an easier or more efficient way of doing something: DO IT. With all the new developments with CSS3, HTML5, etc. etc., sometimes we have to get back to basics to relearn how to do things more efficiently, so here it goes!

Nearly every website has some form of 2.0/dynamic/generated content nowadays, and if your site doesn’t… well, it probably should catch up! I’ll show you how with some new CSS tricks and how it can reduce a lot of overhead of including the entire jQuery library (which would save you approximately 84kb per page load, assuming you have no other asynchronous/client side functionality you need).

I’ll start off with an easy example, since I know most of you take these examples and let your creativity run wild for your own projects. (Note to self: start a “Code Gone Wild” series.)

Usually this is the part where I say “First, let’s include the jQuery library as always.” Not this time, let’s break the rules!

FIRST, start off your document like any other (with the basic structure, set your DOCTYPE appropriately, i.e. strict vs transitional):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
</body>
</html>

Wow, you can already tell this generated content’s going to be a TON easier than using jQuery (for those of you whom aren’t already jQuery fans).

Now let’s add in a div there; every time we hover over that div, we’re going to display our generated content with CSS. Inside of our div, we’re going to place a simple span, like so:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
     <div class=”slisawesome”>
          <span data-title="Hello Cassandra!">What’s my name?</span>
     </div>
</body>
</html>

As you can see, the span content contains a simple question and the data-title attribute contains the answer to that question.

Now let’s just make this div a little bit prettier before we get into the fancy stuff.

Add some style to the <head> section of our document:

<style>
     .slisawesome  {
          /* Will TOTALLY be making another blog about the cool CSS gradients soon */
          background:linear-gradient(to bottom, #8dd2d9 , #58c0c7);
          padding: 20px;  /* give the box some room to breathe */
          width: 125px;  /* give it a fixed width since we know how wide it should be  */
          margin: 100px auto;  /* move it away from the top of the screen AND center it */
          border: 1px solid black;  /* this is just a little border */
          position: relative;  /* this is to help with our generated content positioning */
     }
</style>

Now you should have something that looks like this:

This is good; this is what you should have. Now let’s make the magic happen and add the rest of our CSS3:

<style>
     .slisawesome  {
          /* Will TOTALLY be making another blog about the cool CSS gradients soon */
          background:linear-gradient(to bottom, #8dd2d9 , #58c0c7);
          padding: 20px;  /* give the box some room to breathe */
          width: 125px;  /* give it a fixed width since we know how wide it should be  */
          margin: 100px auto;  /* move it away from the top of the screen AND center it */
          border: 1px solid black;  /* this is just a little border */
          position: relative;  /* this is to help with our generated content positioning */
     }
     .slisawesome span::before {
          content:attr(data-title); /* assigning the data-title attribute value to the content */
          opacity: 0; /* hiding data-title until we hover over it */
          position: absolute; /* positioning our data-title content */
          margin-top: 50px; /* putting more space between our question and answer */
 
          /* Fancy transitions for our data-title when we hover over our question */
          /* which I’m TOTALLY going to write another blog for ;) If you guys want, of course */
          -webkit-transition:opacity 0.4s; /* determines the speed of the transition */
          transition:opacity 0.4s; /* determines the speed of the transition */
     }
</style>

Now, right now, your page should still look like this:

That’s okay! We still have ONE more step to go:

<style>
     .slisawesome  {
          /* Will TOTALLY be making another blog about the cool CSS gradients soon */
          background:linear-gradient(to bottom, #8dd2d9 , #58c0c7);
          padding: 20px;  /* give the box some room to breathe */
          width: 125px;  /* give it a fixed width since we know how wide it should be  */
          margin: 100px auto;  /* move it away from the top of the screen AND center it */
          border: 1px solid black;  /* this is just a little border */
          position: relative;  /* this is to help with our generated content positioning */
     }
     .slisawesome span::before {
          content:attr(data-title); /* assigning the data-title attribute value to the content */
          opacity: 0; /* hiding data-title until we hover over it */
          position: absolute; /* positioning our data-title content */
          margin-top: 50px; /* putting more space between our question and answer */
 
          /* Fancy transitions for our data-title when we hover over our question */
          /* which I’m TOTALLY going to write another blog for ;) If you guys want, of course */
          -webkit-transition:opacity 0.4s; /* determines the speed of the transition */
          transition:opacity 0.4s; /* determines the speed of the transition */
     }
     /* Drum Roll --------- Here’s our hover magic */
     .slisawesome span:hover::before{
          opacity:1;
     }
     /* Okay… that was a little anticlimactic… losing cool points */
</style>

Despite my anticlimactic adding of “the magic,” we just added a :hover that will show full opacity when we hover, so refresh your page and try it out! You should see something like this when you hover over THE QUESTION:

Of course you could REALLY start getting fancy with this by adding some php variables for the logged in user, or perhaps make it dynamic to location, time, etc. The possibilities are endless, so go… go and expand on this awesome generated content technique!

-Cassandra

June 3, 2014

My 5 Favorite Sublime Text 2 Plugins

I can’t believe that is was only a mere year ago since I learned of Sublime Text 2. I know, I know … where have I been? What kind of developer was I that I didn’t even know of Sublime Text? I’ll take the criticism, as I can honestly say it has been the best text editor I have ever used.

It’s extremely fast. I rarely wait for saves, uploads, or syntax highlighting, it keeps up with everything I do and allows me to develop directly from the keyboard. I hardly ever reach for my mouse!

It looks awesome. It has kind of retro-look for those developers who remember coding purely from the terminal or DOS. It really brings back memories.

It can be extended. Need some extra functionality that doesn’t come out-of-the-box? Sublime Text 2 has a range of available plugins that you can install to enhance your capabilities with this awesome text editor. In this blog, I’ll cover my top five favorite plugins of all time, what they do, and why they’re great!

1. BracketHighlighter

Many people believe that bracket highlighting should be a ready-made helper for developers of all languages. I agree on this point, however, at least Sublime Text 2 provides a plugin for this. It’s a very simple addition; it allows you to see if your opening brackets have an accompanying closing bracket. Many developers will tell you stories of these large and complex programs that consumed much of their time as they searched for one simple error … only to find that it was just a missing closing bracket.

In addition, it highlights opening and closing tags and quotes, for those of you who do a lot of HTML/XHTML, both bracket and tag settings are customizable.

For more details on the plugin check out the BracketHighlighter GitHub page.

2. DocBlockr

This is a neat plugin that speeds up and simplifies documentation. It supports PHP, Javascript, Java, Action Script, Objective C, C, C++, and Coffee Script.

By typing this:

/** (Press Enter)

The plugin automatically returns this:

/**
*
*/

Boom, the quickest way to document that I’ve ever seen.

In order to document your functions, just put it in your comment:

/** (Press Enter)
function myFunction(var1, var2) { }

And, it'll become:

/**
*[myFunction description]
* @param {[type]} var1 [description]
* @param {[type]} var2 [description]
* @param {[type]}
*/

function myFunction (var1, var2) { }

When you want to do variable documentation, the structure is similar:

/** (Press Enter)
myVar = 10

The plugin will fill out the documentation block like this:

/**
*[myVar description]
* @type {Number}
*/

Tell me that this isn’t nifty! If you want to try it out or just get a closer look at this plugin, head here.

3. Emmet (previously known as Zen Coding)

Unfortunately, I encountered some oddities when I tried to install Emmet with SublimeLinter, so I decided to disable the Linter in favor of Emmet to give it a spin. I absolutely love Emmet.

It provides a much more efficient way to code by providing what they call “abbreviations.” For example, if I want to create a div with an unordered list and one bullet point in it, Emmet lets me save myself a lot of time ... I can type this into Sublime:

div>ul>li

And press Control+E, and my code automatically turns into this:

<div>
    <ul>
        <li></li>
    </ul>
</div>

If I need to add multiple <li> tags, I can easily replicate them with a small addition:

div>ul>li*3

When I hit Control+E, voila! The unordered list structure is quickly generated:

<div>
    <ul>
        <li></li> 
        <li></li>
        <li></li>
    </ul>
</div>

That's just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Emmet's functionality, and if you’re as impressed as I am, you should check out their site: http://docs.emmet.io/

4. SFTP

I think the title of the plugin says it all. It allows you to directly connect to your server and sync projects and files just by saving. You will never have to edit a file in a text editor, open your FTP client and upload the file again. Now, you can do it directly from Sublime Text 2.

When used in conjunction with Projects, you’ll find that you can easily save hours of time spent on remote uploading. By far, SFTP for Sublime Projects is one of the most essential plugins you’ll need for any project!

5. SideBarEnhancements

This is a small plugin that makes minor adjustments to the Files and Folders sidebar, providing a more intuitive interface. Though this doesn’t add much functionality, it can definitely speed things up. Take a look at the plugin on the SideBarEnhancements GitHub page

I hope this list of Sublime Text 2 plugins will enhance your capabilities and ease up your processes, as it has done for me. Give them a try and let me know what you think. Also, if you have a different favorite plugin, I’d love to hear about it.

-Cassandra

May 1, 2014

New App Release: SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

Today, the SoftLayer development team is launching a new platform accessibility tool for SoftLayer customers who want to easily manage their infrastructure from Windows. We've gotten a great response from the users of SoftLayer Mobile app for Windows Phone, so we turned our attention to creating an app for customers on Windows 8.1: SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1.

With a growing number of users adopting and embracing Windows 8.1 on their PCs, and the Windows Store is becoming a vibrant community of useful apps for those customers. There are more than 145,000 apps on the Windows Store, and that number is expected to increase exponentially following Microsoft’s recent introduction of "Universal Apps for Windows Phone 8.1 and Windows 8.1.” With all that goodness and an expanding market, it was imperative for our mobile development team to build an app for customers using Windows 8.1 as their default OS or carrying Windows RT tablets.

Why Windows 8.1?

Our team wants to provide simple, efficient ways for customers to connect to SoftLayer infrastructure and perform any necessary management tasks while on-the-go. Our team is inspired by the power of connected devices in Windows ecosystem. By developing an app for Windows 8.1, we will slowly bring the phone, tablet and PC onto one streamlined platform — a concept many smart devices are adopting quickly.

What’s Fresh?

New Dashboard

The SoftLayer Mobile app for Windows 8.1 is a fresh new approach to its Windows Phone sibling. The app provides a dashboard view after authentication that provides a snapshot of some of the most commonly used information and controls in the portal.

Currently, the dashboard supports four different panels: Tickets, devices, accounting and bandwidth. All display an overview of relevant information for you and your environment. The dashboard also allows you to quickly add a ticket or make a one-time payment on your account.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

In-line Ticket Updates

In the new tickets module, you can update tickets without ever leaving the page. This functionality is similar to what you see on many social websites, and it's integrated to be seamless.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

Search Everywhere!

One of the coolest additions to the new app is the introduction of search functionality in each module. Now, you can search a ticket, a device, or an invoice by just typing into the search box! The search capability lets you spend less time scrolling and more time working.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

Bandwidth Display

Smart phones have apps that measure and report how much data you are using, and your infrastructure should be similarly transparent Bandwidth usage is an important aspect of server management, so we built the bandwidth module to show your infrastructure's public and private traffic for current and previous billing cycles. This view also helps you see when a server is about to reach its limits so that you can plan accordingly.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

The module provides two ways to look at the data:

  • In a tabular form by clicking the “Show/Hide Traffic Details” button.
  • In a graphic representation by clicking the “View Graph” button.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

Same Functionality. Better Experience.

Sometimes change is not always needed for a nicely crafted feature. The new app keeps the same feature richness of the Windows Phone app and arranges it in a user-friendly way. For example, in the devices module, you can navigate to between different tabs to get the information you need, from password lists and attached tickets to a specific device or monitoring alarms.

The “Remote Control” section on the module allows you to perform actions such as rebooting, power cycles, restarts and pinging servers. In addition, you can view hardware and software installed on the device along with the hardware and network components attached. In the current phone version, you can only see the root password for the device, but in the Windows 8.1 app, you see all passwords for the server.

SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

What's Next?

During the development of this app, the team's goal was to test to adopt a framework that would be ideal for scaling. More and more developers are adopting a Model-View-Model (MVVM) approach to mobile and web app development, so our goal was to use that approach for this project. The significant challenge we faced when adopting this approach was finding a well-supported framework that met our application's needs. We weren't able to find suitable frameworks that committed regular updates in SDKs or in APIs, so we ended up using the same MVVM principles without any underlying framework. In the end, the project allowed us to create our own framework for future projects!

There are many exciting features that are lined up for the Windows 8.1 app. Download it now: SoftLayer Mobile for Windows 8.1

After you try it out, please submit your feedback ... We want to keep improving the app by providing the features and functionality that matter most to you.

-Imran

April 23, 2014

Sysadmin Tips and Tricks - Stop Using Root!

A common mistake newer Linux system administrators make is the overuse of root. It seems so easy! Everything is so much simpler! But in the end, it’s not—and it’s only a matter of time before you wish you had not been so free and easy with your super-user, use. Let me try to convince you.

Let’s start with a little history. The antecedents of Linux go all the way back to the early 1970s, when computers cost tens of thousands of dollars (at least). With that kind of expense, you as a user would hardly have a computer sitting on your desk (not to mention they were at least refrigerator-sized), and you would also not have the use of it dedicated to your needs. What was obviously needed was an operating system that would allow multiple users to use the machine at once, via terminals, in order to make the most use of the computing resources available.

If you think about it, it’s clear that the operating system had to be very good at keeping users from being able to stomp on each other’s files and processes. So the early UNIX™ variants were multi-user systems from the get-go. In the ensuing forty years, these systems have only gotten better at keeping the various users and processes from harming each other. And this is the technology that you’re paying for when you use Linux or other modern variants.

Now, you may think, “That doesn’t apply to me—I’m the only user on my server!” But are you, really?

You probably run Apache, which is generally run as the user httpd or apache. Why not root? Because if you run Apache as root, then anyone on the outside who manages to get Apache to execute arbitrary code, would then have that code running as root! Next thing you know, they can execute "rm –rf /," or worse, invade your system altogether and steal proprietary information. By running as a non-root user, even if the attacker gets total access to that user, they are limited to what that user can touch. Thus, user httpd is compromised, but not the entire server.

The same thing is true for mail servers, FTP servers, and so on. They all rely on the Linux permissions system in order to give the programs access to as little as possible—ideally, only exactly what they need to do their jobs.

So, think of yourself as another process on the system. When you log in as your regular user, you are limited in what you can do. But this is not intended to harm you or irritate you—indeed; the system is designed to keep you from accidentally doing damage to your server.

For example, consider if you wanted to completely remove a directory called ‘home’ within your home directory. Note the ever so slight difference between the first command:

rm –R home

And the second command:

rm –R /home

The first command removes a directory called ‘home’ from wherever you happen to be sitting on the file system. The second removes all users’ home directories from the system. One little slash makes all the difference in the world. This is probably why it has been said that Linux gives you enough rope to hang yourself with. Executing the second command as root looks like this:

server:# rm –R /home 
server.com#

And it’s just gone! Whereas if you accidentally put that slash in there while logged in as your user, you would get:

server:# rm –R /home 
server:# rm: cannot remove `home’: Permission denied

This will annoy you, until you realize that if you’d done it as root you would have wiped out all your customers home directories.

In short, just like the processes that run on your machine, you would be well served to use only the permissions you need. This is why many Linux distributions today encourage the use of sudo—you don’t even become root, but just execute things as root when needed. It’s a good policy, and makes the best use of four decades of expertise that have gone into the system you are using.

- Lee

P.S. This is also why you pretty much never want to chmod 777 anything!

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