Posts Tagged 'Difference'

September 30, 2014

SELLING SOFTLAYER (in Amsterdam)

Selling SoftLayer services to Internet-centric companies—hosting resellers, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) providers, big data and e-commerce companies—are no-brainers. These companies clearly see the advantages that come with having their servers (the backbone of their business) hosted by a specialist. They switch their capital expenses into variable costs that can be spread over time.

On the flip side are companies in non-Internet-centric industries—banking, health care, oil & gas, and aerospace. How do these companies find value in the IaaS offered by SoftLayer? The IT infrastructure (servers to be precise) accounts for less than 5 percent of their capital expenditure (CAPEX) as opposed to almost 95 percent for Internet-centric companies.

Will the same value proposition work for both Internet-centric and non-Internet-centric companies?

With Internet-centric companies (where servers constitute up to 95 percent of CAPEX), the majority of the workforce is server-savvy. This means there is a very high chance any contact we have with these companies will be with a server-savvy fellow. Selling SoftLayer will then be a question of how SoftLayer’s USPs differentiate from the competition.

The current industry trend is driving a faulty message: The cloud is a commodity.

The truth is: Unlike basic commodities (electricity, gas, or cable), where there is little or no differentiation between what the end user gets irrespective of the provider, cloud and hosting in general are different. This faulty commodity-based assumption drives the price wars in cloud computing.

Comparing apples and oranges cumulus and stratus.

To test and disprove this theory, I brought a customer’s systems engineer (a server expert) into a sales discussion with the CTO.

I requested to put the price negotiations on hold for about 4 hours, and evaluate the services first. To do this, I asked for the exact configuration that the customer had hosted with a competitor. I ordered the exact configuration on the SoftLayer platform and within 2 hours the servers were ready. When the customer’s system engineer tested the performance of the SoftLayer server and compared it to what they had from a competitor, the price comparison was thrown out the window for good.

There are many different facets wherein SoftLayer outperforms the competition but unfortunately, most prospective customers only see price.

For the non-Internet-centric companies, to reach the price discussion is a milestone in itself. Pricing negotiations only begin when the need and suitability (originality) have been established.

The IBM and SoftLayer effect.

As a salesperson, I subscribe to the SCOTSMAN Sales Qualification Matrix (Solution, Competition, Originality, Timescales, Size, Money, Authority, and Need). Most companies in this group need solutions. IaaS is just part of that solution. This is where IBM (Big Blue) comes into the picture. As a service giant in the IT Sector, IBM can and will build on SoftLayer’s IaaS prowess to conquer this landscape. The synergies that are coming from this acquisition will send shockwaves across the industry.

Question is: Will the stakeholders maximize this potential to the fullest?

- Valentine Che, Global Sales, AMS01

July 16, 2014

Vyatta Gateway Appliance vs Vyatta Network OS

I hear this question almost daily: “What’s the difference between the Vyatta Network OS offered by SoftLayer and the SoftLayer Vyatta Gateway Appliance?” The honest answer is, from a software perspective, nothing. However from a deployment perspective, there are a couple fundamental differences.

Vyatta Network OS on the SoftLayer Platform

SoftLayer offers customers the ability to spin up different bare metal or virtual server configurations, and choose either the community or subscription edition of the Vyatta Network operating system. The server is deployed like any other host on the SoftLayer platform with a public and private interface placed in the VLANs selected while ordering. Once online, you can route traffic through the Vyatta Network server by changing the default gateway on your hosts to use the Vyatta Network server IP rather than the default gateway. You have the option to configure ingress and egress ACLs for your bare metal or virtual servers that route through the Vyatta Network server. The Vyatta Network server can also be configured as a VPN end point to terminate Internet Protocol Security (IPSEC), Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE), or OpenSSL VPN connections, and securely connect to the SoftLayer Private Network. Sounds great right?

So, how is a Vyatta Network OS server different from a SoftLayer Vyatta Gateway Appliance?

A True Gateway

While it’s true that the Vyatta Gateway Appliance has the same functionality as a server running the Vyatta Network operating system, one of the primary differences is that the Vyatta Gateway Appliance is delivered as a true gateway. You may be asking yourself what that means. It means that the Vyatta Gateway Appliance is the only entry and exit point for traffic on VLANs you associate with it. When you place an order for the Vyatta Gateway Appliance and select your public and private VLANs, the Vyatta Gateway Appliance comes online with its native VLAN for its public and private interfaces in a transit VLAN. The VLANs you selected are trunked to the gateway appliance’s public and private interfaces via an 802.1q trunk setup on the server’s interface switch ports. These VLANs will show up in the customer portal as associated VLANs for the Vyatta Gateway Appliance.

This configuration allows SoftLayer to create an outside, unprotected interface (in the transit VLAN) and an inside, protected interface (on your bare metal server or virtual server VLAN). As part of the configuration, we set up SoftLayer routers to static route all IP space that belongs to the associated VLANs to the Vyatta Gateway Appliance transit VLAN IP address. The servers you have in a VLAN associated with gateway appliance can no longer use the SoftLayer default gateway to route in and out of the VLAN. All traffic must be filtered through the Gateway Appliance, making it a true gateway.

This differs from a server deployed with the Vyatta Network OS because hosts behind the Vyatta Network OS server can route around it by simply changing their default gateway back to the SoftLayer default gateway.

N-Tier Architecture

Another difference is that the gateway appliance gives customers the option to route multiple public and private VLANs in the same pod (delineated by an FCR/BCR pair) through the device. This allows you to use the gateway appliance to create granular segmentation between different VLANs within your environment, and set up a traditional tiered infrastructure environment with ingress and egress rules between the tiers.

A server running Vyatta Network OS cannot be configured this way. The Vyatta Network OS server is placed in a single public and private VLAN, and there is no option to associate different VLANs with the server.

I hope this helps clear up the confusion around Vyatta on the SoftLayer platform. As always, if you have any questions or concerns about any of SoftLayer’s products or services, the sales and sales engineering teams are happy to help.

-Kelly

March 1, 2010

Don’t Run a Data Center – Run Your Business!

I have a friend who recently took a CTO position with a medium-sized company. The huge company that previously employed him moved their entire IT staff a long way outside of Texas to a rather unpleasant location as a cost cutting move. He and many others declined the relocation offer. I can’t say as I blame them.

The other day, he told me some of the interesting things he’s found at his new company. This company is not a technology company but a professional services company. Up to now, they have opted to be in the IT business by running their own data center. To keep this post to a reasonable length, I’ll just mention a few of the things he’s run into.

Keeping the room powered and cool – trust me, this is harder than it sounds. It involves things like redundant power, UPS devices, generators, CRAC units, dehumidifiers, fire suppression, etc. All this stuff must be tested and maintained constantly.

Ordering new servers – they have to go through an online configurator, and then wait to receive the shipment. Once it arrives, they have to unpack it, rack it, power it up, and install the software. The cycle time from ordering a new server to getting it into production can stretch from days to weeks.

Tracking assets – needless to say, he’s found several holes in the process here. Knowing how much RAM is supposed to be in each server vs. what’s really there is a struggle. Heck, even knowing what servers are supposed to be there is a challenge. It seems that as servers are moved, replaced, or disposed of that the asset tracking system and processes are not as solid as he would like. These loose operations also bring heat from accountants and auditors, especially if a server ‘s value is still on the balance sheet but it has actually been tossed out and they no longer own it.

Maintenance – they pay for a service agreement where a tech is guaranteed to be onsite in 4 hours to do anything up to a complete rip and replace to get them back in production. Once he asked why several servers, each north of $10,000 in value, were just laying around in a parts cage. He was told these were for spare parts in case of an emergency, just in case they couldn’t wait 4 hours.

Bankers and lessors routinely ask us who our biggest competitors are. We routinely tell them that they are not other hosting companies – they are companies like the one described above that insist on being in the data center business even though they are not IT infrastructure companies. Since these companies are our largest competition, let’s look at how SoftLayer beats the competition on the items listed above.

Keeping the room powered and cool – as a customer of SoftLayer, you simply don’t have to worry about all this. Not at all. This is a huge savings of time, effort, and money.

Ordering new servers – Once you either run through the configurator or call your SLales rep with your order, your new servers are immediately provisioned. The cloud products are up in minutes, and you can have a few HUNDRED dedicated servers ready for production in a few hours. Not in days or weeks or months.

Tracking assets – From the accounting side of things, you just don’t have to worry about tracking the assets at all as a SoftLayer customer. They are an operating expense to our customers, not a capital expenditure. As far as knowing what assets you have to work with, you have access to the best customer portal in the business where every detail about every server is kept up in real time, right down to the individual sticks of RAM and drive configurations of each server. If you need tighter integration, SoftLayer provides an API to put all this information seamlessly into your environment. Disposing of a server is a simple cancellation ticket. It couldn’t be easier.

Maintenance – this is also a simple ticket submission, which is resolved in an impressive turnaround time. This service is included in SoftLayer’s monthly fees. There is no need to stockpile parts or entire servers for emergencies.

Bottom line, if your business’s core competency is not IT infrastructure, you are being beaten in the IT infrastructure business by SoftLayer. You are spending way too much time, money, and attention to run something that isn’t a part of your business. Hey, if you can’t beat us, then join us!

By the way, my friend is proposing a major project for his company in 2010. That project is getting out of the business of running a datacenter. He faces a lot of resistance to change “the way we’ve always done it” from the other senior executives. From my point of view, it’s a no brainer. But I’m biased I guess. I’d just tell them, hey, don’t run a data center – run your business!

January 20, 2010

Mexican Food vs. On Demand Infrastructure

My friend Ric Moseley has an interesting theory regarding Mexican food. He claims that all Mexican food has the same basic major components, each dish just stacks the components up in different ways. The major components are tortillas, meat and sauce. Of course there are a couple of different ways to prepare each of these components, but in the end, it really boils down to tortillas, meat and sauce. This applies to just about every main-line dish you find on the menu at any number of the local Tex-Mex restaurants. Crispy tacos, soft tacos, enchiladas, tostadas, burritos, fajitas, nachos, quesadillas, flautas, tamales (well almost)... Add more here... I'm going to stop myself before I start sounding like Benjamin "Bubba" Bufford-Blue from Forrest Gump, but you get the idea. By no means am I knocking the combined assembly. Quite the opposite; I'm a huge fan! When it comes down to it, I appreciate the creativity that is involved in putting these ingredients together in such a manner that the finished combination is far greater than the sum of its parts.

And that kind of leads me back to what SoftLayer brings to the table, so to speak. SoftLayer provides all sorts of components for the modern enterprise. Plenty of folks use them as is, heck who doesn't enjoy a warm fresh tortilla with a pad of butter. However, for many people, it’s just an appetizer. The real satisfaction is from the combination of the united components when that steaming plate of enchiladas arrives. One of the great satisfactions of my job is seeing how our customers roll up our components in new and creative ways. The array of application deployments that are hosted by SoftLayer is entirely staggering. Let me throw on my digital chef hat for a minute. Start with a private network database, add public network servers, mix in some cloud computing for quick scalability, and wrap it all in a load balancer. Que bueno! That's some good cooking, and this chef is off to the margarita machine!

December 14, 2009

‘Tis the Season to Get Things Done

It’s the holiday season, and that means everyone is getting busier. On top of all the existing responsibilities, millions of people are going shopping for gifts, decorating their houses, and navigating the bad weather. On top of all that, many people take their time off during the holiday season!

With this kind of time crunch, it’s best for your business to lie low until after the new year, right? Not so! With all this buying, selling, and giving going on, there’s a lot of extra retail data to process. Plus, it’s the end of the calendar year, many businesses have to get their finances in order too. ALSO, all these newly purchased electronic devices are soon going to be turned on and hooked up to the Internet, where they will almost surely put a new load on your servers.

Systems and network administrators need to be prepared for this influx of new traffic. Sometimes, this means purchasing new servers. However, it’s inefficient to buy the servers so far in advance when you don’t yet know what you will need. It’s best to wait until you’re sure you will need more servers and how many to order. At another hosting company, that would be a problem. People in our industry take the holidays off, too. Lowering the number of sales people and technicians and raising the number of new server requests would normally result in a disaster.

Luckily, SoftLayer does automatic provisioning. As soon as you order your server, it will be provisioned in two to four hours. Day or night, June 3rd or December 31st, if we have it, you can have control over it in two to four hours.

And therein lies the beauty of the SoftLayer system. You don’t have to wait for US to scale your business. If you need another server, get it. When it’s ready, it will automatically be added to your account’s private network and be available to you. You can even automate your server configuration and setup. Depending on the amount of data you need to transfer to a new server, you can have another server up and running your website less than 5 hours from the time you realized you needed it.

In fact, by using the SoftLayer API (and some clever configuration scripts on your servers) you can do live scaling on your website. Using the API, you can provision new servers exactly like the ones you already have. Once they’re available, a script can mirror the configurations from an existing machine to the new machine. Use the SoftLayer API once more to add the new servers to your load balancer rotation, and you’re in business! All without relying on any humans, even yourself! Treat yourself to some R&R this holiday season, while your website continues to get things done for you.

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