Posts Tagged 'Display'

May 23, 2012

Web Development - JavaScript - Creating a Sticky Menu

When designing websites, I like to focus on ease of use and accessibility for the end user. While creating your site to be friendly to screen readers and text-based browsers is a must, the accessibility I'm referring to is making it easy for your audience to navigate your site and perform certain common actions. By providing an easy interface for your users, you are immediately increasing your chances that they'll return for more of your site's goodness.

Thus far in our "Web Development" blog series, we've looked at JavaScript Optimization, HTML5 Custom Data Attributes, HTML5 Web Fonts and using CSS to style the Highlight Selection. In this post, we're going to create a "sticky" menu at the top of a page. As a user scrolls down, the menu will "stick" to the top and always be visible (think of Facebook's Timeline view), allowing the user quicker access to clicking common links. With some simple HTML, CSS and JavaScript, you can have a sticky menu in no time.

Let's start with our HTML. We're going to have a simple header, menu and content section that we'll throw in our <body> tag.

<header>
    <h1>My Header</h1>
</header>
<nav id="menu">
    <ul id="menu-list">
        <li>Items</li>
    </ul>
</nav>
<div id="content">
    Some content
</div>

For brevity, I've shortened the content I show here, but the working example will have all the information. Now we can throw in some CSS to style our elements. The important part here is how the <nav> is styled.

nav#menu {
    background: #FFF;
    clear: both;
    margin: 40px 0 80px 0;
    width: 99.8%;
    z-index: 2;
}
ul#menu-list li {
    border: solid 1px blue;
    list-style-type: none;
    display: inline-block;
    margin: 0 -3px;
    padding: 4px 10px;
    width: auto;
}

We have set the menu's background to white (#FFF) and given it a z-index of 2 so that when the user scrolls, the menu will stay on top and not be see-through. We've also set the list items to be styled inline-block, but you can style your items however you desire.

Now we get to the fun part – the JavaScript. I've created a class using Mootools, but similar functionality could be achieved using your favorite JavaScript framework. Let's examine our initialize method (our constructor) in our Stickit class.

var Stickit = this.Stickit = new Class({
    initialize: function(item, options) {
        // 'item' is our nav#menu in this case
        this.item = document.id(item);
 
        // The element we're scrolling will be the window
        this.scrollTarget = document.id(options.scrollTarget || document.window);
 
        // The 'anchor' is an empty element that will always keep the same location
        // when the user scrolls. This is needed because this.item will change and
        // we cannot rely on it for accurate calculations.
        this.anchor = new Element('div').inject(this.item, 'top');
 
        // The 'filler' is an empty element that we'll use as a space filler for when
        // the 'item' is being manipulated - this will prevent the content below from
        // jumping around when we scroll.
        this.filler = new Element('div').inject(this.item, 'after');
 
        // Set the styles of our 'filler' to match the styles of the 'item'
        this.setFillerStyles();
 
        // Initialize our scroll events – see the next code section for details
        this.initEvents();
    }
});

What we're doing here is grabbing our element to stick to the top – in this case, nav#menu – and initializing our other important elements. I'll review these in the next code section.

var Stickit = this.Stickit = new Class({
    ...
    initEvents: function() {
        var that = this,
            // Grab the position of the anchor to be used for comparison during vertical scroll
            anchorOffsetY = this.anchor.getPosition().y,
            // Grab our original styles of our 'item' so that we can reset them later
            originalStyles = this.item.getStyles('margin-top', 'position', 'top');
 
        // This is the function we'll provide as our scroll event handler
        var stickit = function(e) {
            // Determine if we have scrolled beyond our threshold - in this case, our
            // anchor which is located as the first element of our 'item'
            var targetScrollY = that.scrollTarget.getScroll().y,
                fixit = targetScrollY > anchorOffsetY;
 
            if (fixit &amp;&amp; that.cache != 'fixed') {
                // If we have scrolled beyond the threshold, fix the 'item' to the top
                // of the window with the following styles: margin-top, position and top
                that.item.setStyles({
                    'margin-top': 0,
                    position: 'fixed',
                    top: 0
                });
                // Show our (empty) filler so that the content below the 'item' does not
                // jump - this would otherwise be distracting to the user
                that.filler.setStyle('display', 'block');
                // Cache our value so that we only set the styles when we need to
                that.cache = 'fixed';
            }
            else if (!fixit &amp;&amp; that.cache != 'default') {
                // We have not scrolled beyond the threshold.
                // Hide our filler
                that.filler.setStyle('display', 'none');
                // Reset the styles to our 'item'
                that.item.setStyles(originalStyles);
                // Cache our values so we don't keep resetting the styles
                that.cache = 'default';
            }
        };
 
        // Add our scroll event to the target - the 'window' in this case
        this.scrollTarget.addEvent('scroll', stickit);
        // Fire our scroll event so that all the elements and styles are initialized
        this.scrollTarget.fireEvent('scroll');
    }
});

This method contains the meat of our functionality. The logic includes that we test how far the user has scrolled down on the page. If s/he scrolls past the threshold – in this case, the anchor which is located at the very top of the "stuck" item – then we set the menu to be fixed to the top of the page by setting the CSS values for margin-top, position and top. We also display a filler so that the content below the menu doesn't jump when we set the menu's position to fixed. When the user scrolls back to the top, the styles are reset to their original values and the filler is hidden.

To see a full working example, check out this fiddle. The Stickit class I created is flexible enough so that you can "stick" any element to the top of the page, and you can specify a different scrollTarget, which will allow you to scroll another element (besides the window) and allow the item to stick to the top of that element instead of the window. If you want to give that a try, you can specify different options in Stickit and modify your CSS as needed to get it working as you'd like.

Happy coding,

-Philip

March 13, 2012

Web Development - CSS - Highlight Selection

I immediately fell in love with CSS when we were introduced in late 2000. The ability to style a whole site outside the HTML was a fantastic concept and probably my first true introduction to separation of style and content. Put your words over here, and put how you display those words over there. So simple! Since then I have always been an advocate of cascading style sheets. Today's tip will involve an effortless addition that will have your readers say, "Ooooh. That's a clever little change."

I find that when I read articles and blogs online, I not only read with my eyes, I scan the page with my mouse. Especially if it's a wordy article or not styled in smaller columns, I highlight the text by clicking and dragging to help me maintain my focus. Up until recently, whenever you selected text that way in your browser, your operating system would choose the color of the background highlight. For Windows, this is generally blue. For OS X, this is whatever you've set your preferences to (which is light blue by default).

For those of you that use a newer version of Webkit (Chrome or Safari) or Gecko (Firefox), the site designer can determine what color to highlight your selection of text, and CSS has made it easy.

/* Webkit */
::selection {
    background: #972F2C;
    color: #FFF;
}
/* Gecko/Mozilla */
::-moz-selection {
    background: #972F2C;
    color: #FFF;
}

As of today, Webkit browsers are the only ones that support ::selection without browser prefixing. Firefox requires the -moz- prefix. Here we have set the highlight background color to "SoftLayer Red" (#972F2C) and made the text color white (#FFF). It should be noted that earlier versions of Webkit and Gecko did not support anything but the background property. There is still limited support for which CSS properties are allowed during selection. You are unable to change font-style, font-size, text-decoration and many other properties, but we can hope support for most of the properties will be available in the future.

This is pretty cool so far, but we can take it one small step further. Just like other selectors, we can apply the ::selection selector to other elements and style each one differently.

h2::selection {
    background: #B72E33;
    color: #FFF;
}
p::selection {
    background: #ACEFB2;
}
div::selection {
    background: #E4DB80;
}
span::selection {
    background: #C780E4;
    color: #FFF;
}

This produces the following:

Highlighting Example

Surprise your readers and give them some highlight goodness.

Happy coding!

-Philip

November 29, 2011

SoftLayer Mobile v. 1.1 on Windows Phone: New Features

I was on a Caribbean cruise during the second week of November, and I kept telling myself that the first thing I needed to taste was a delicious mango. Even though I knew it's out of season, I still had hopes. I had a chance to indulge in that tropical fruit, and I couldn't help but think about a mango that gets tastier with every day: the new Windows Phone OS 7.1, codenamed "Mango."

I'm not going to talk about Mango or its new sensational features, but I do want to share a few of the changes that we pushed out to the Windows Phone Marketplace as a version 1.1 of SoftLayer Mobile. While I could ramble for pages about all of the updates and our strategy in building out and improving the mobile platform, but I'll try to be brief and only share four of the biggest new features the team included in this release.

Verisign Authentication
The first update you'll notice when you fire up SoftLayer Mobile 1.1 on Windows Phone is the security-rich inclusion of VeriSign authentication. You are able to activate an additional layer of security by requiring that users confirm their identity with a trusted third party tool before they get access to your account. In this case, the third party vendor is VeriSign. Every customer looking to bake in additional security on their account will appreciate this addition.

SoftLayer Mobile WP

VeriSign authentication in SoftLayer Mobile on WP7

Device-Based Bandwidth
The next big addition to this Windows Phone app release is the inclusion of device-based bandwidth for two billing cycles – your current cycle and the previous cycle. In v. 1.0 of SoftLayer Mobile, users were only able to see bandwidth data for the current billing cycle ... It's useful, but you don't have a frame of reference immediately available. This release provides that frame of reference. One of the coolest parts is the aesthetically pleasing presentation: our metro-style container, "pivot control." Just slide through and see your billing cycles in one long view!

SoftLayer Mobile WP

Billing cycle view along with a button to view graph for that cycle

Bandwidth Graphs
If you didn't notice from the picture, its caption or the heading of this section, the next big update is the inclusion of bandwidth graphs! The bandwidth graph page gives you a bird's eye view of your bandwidth activity for any selected billing cycle. You'll see the max "Inbound," "Outbound" and "Total" values. Those different marks are very useful if you're tracking which days your device uses the most bandwidth and when those surges subside. The application uses the built-in charting functionality that comes with Silverlight libraries. Since we're taking advantage of those goodies, you can bet it looks beautiful. No, it's not a bitmap image ... it's a real bandwidth chart. As with the other bandwidth update, the graphs are available for both the current and the previous billing cycle.

SoftLayer Mobile WP

Bandwidth chart for a previous billing cycle

Ticket Updates
The next addition to the family is a new way to visually distinguish your unread updates on tickets while viewing a ticket list page. The "toast" notification for the ticket list view gives flags unread ticket updates, and the ticket list will feature bold text on the ticket's subject if that ticket is marked with an "unread update" *ndash; meaning an employee or someone has an update to that ticket which you haven't seen yet. This is very much Outlook-y style and very native to Windows Phone.

SoftLayer Mobile WP

Toast notification along with Outlook-style unread ticket

What's Next?
With this release, we're not resting on our laurels, so what are we doing in our labs? Right now we're working on OS migration to move our existing app from OS 7.0 to the new Mango-flavored Windows Phone 7 version I mentioned a little earlier. Now you see why I was so fixated on mangoes while I was on vacation. The migrated mango app will only be available to devices that are mango-licious (Upgraded to 7.1).

Stay tuned, and you'll see some of the other new features we're working on very soon. If you have a Windows Phone, you need to download SoftLayer Mobile, rate it and give us your feedback!

-Imran

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