Posts Tagged 'E Commerce'

June 5, 2015

Big Data Academy Rewind: Cloud and E-commerce Webinar

The world of big data applications is a nebulous one; to say a lot is expected of these apps is the understatement of the year. Their workloads are massive, their challenges are many, and their infrastructure solutions must be tailored to support the amount of work they do.

But where big data workloads raise big questions, the cloud has big answers. Through the Big Data Academy, SoftLayer and Cloudant have joined forces to help you learn more about deploying big data workloads in the cloud, optimizing your infrastructure environment, and capitalizing on the value of your data via a series of free webinars and workshops.

What if you weren't able to catch any of the free webinars or workshops this time around? You're in luck: we'll be presenting them here in a three-part series you can watch, pause, rewind, and replay at your leisure.

Our Big Data Academy webinar series rewind kicks off by teaching you how to make the cloud work for those big data applications in the land of e-commerce. In short, you’ll learn how to optimize while you monetize.

Watch the webinar below:

Stay tuned for the next Big Data Academy webinar rewind, where we'll talk all about security in the hybrid cloud. Better yet, if you find yourself in Europe this summer, the Big Data Academy has gone backpacking across the continent, with free in-person workshops in Amsterdam, Berlin, London, Paris, and Helsinki throughout June and July. Register now and top off your summer vacation with a free European workshop. (Bonus: All workshop participants will receive a special offer up to $1,250 per month for six months on SoftLayer.)

TOPICS INCLUDE:

  • [00:00:43.00]   Introduction of Harold Smith, SoftLayer Director of Sales Engineering
  • [00:1:00.00]   The history of SoftLayer and its relationship to the cloud
  • [00:4:26.00]   The SoftLayer definition of "cloud"
  • [00:8:40.00]   Why choose SoftLayer?
  • [00:10:33.00]  Cloud solutions for common big data challenges in e-commerce
  • [00:12:09.00]  SoftLayer cloud advantages for e-commerce
  • [00:13:24.00]  Big data solutions optimized on SoftLayer
  • [00:15:33.00]  Customer success stories: Tiket.com and HotelsCombined.com
  • [00:18:18.00]   Why choose Cloudant on SoftLayer?
  • [00:20:24.00]  Introduction of Glynn Bird, IBM Cloudant Developer Advocate
  • [00:21:14.00]   The state of the digital world
  • [00:22:43.00]  Which database should you use to build your app?
  • [00:25:00.00]  Introduction to IBM Cloudant
  • [00:27:32.00]  Cloudant deployment options
  • [00:29:07.00]  Why do e-commerce businesses use Cloudant?
  • [00:29:11.00]   Elastic cloud scalability
  • [00:32:53.00]  Data synchronicity
  • [00:34:48.00]  Geo-mobility
  • [00:34:25.00]  Freedom and fluidity of deployment
  • [00:36:46.00]  Customer success story: GreenMan Gaming
  • [00:38:46.00]  Cloudant for e-commerce
  • [00:41:10.00]   Questions and conclusion

-Fayza

February 2, 2015

#SLCloudLove: Growing an e-Commerce Business On The Cloud

Editor’s Note: Each month in 2015, we’ll be celebrating the cornucopia of reasons why the cloud reigns supreme — from customer tales to cloud insights and everything in between. During February, the notorious month of love, we’re showing you exactly why we heart the cloud. Follow all the fun on your favorite social networks by keeping tabs on #SLCloudLove.

Clicking Add to Cart—that’s how I like to shop these days. Brick and mortar shopping might be retail therapy, but the convenience and online discounts at my fingertips appeases my inherently lazy human tendencies.

With more and more online e-stores cropping up, physical retail outlets can no longer ignore not having an online presence, including a mobile-friendly website and ordering system. The numbers say it all:

  • e-Commerce sales are expected to be more than $1.7 trillion with mobile commerce accounting for nearly $300 billion in sales. Read more here.
  • In India, the e-commerce market is expected to reach $6 billion in 2015—a 70 percent increase over 2014. Read more here.
  • The Chinese government is allowing foreign-owned e-commerce companies to operate in the Shanghai Free Trade Zone as part of a pilot program; the market is expected to see a lot of inflow despite tough competition from local giants like JD.com and Alibaba. Read more here.
  • The six largest Southeast Asian countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam) reached $7 billion in total revenues in 2013 and will grow at a CAGR of 37.6 percent to reach $34.5 billion by 2018. Read more here.

So when I recently attended the iMedia Online Retail Summit, I jumped at the chance to discuss with the audience the benefits of moving their e-Commerce business to the cloud as well as discussing some very interesting stories about e-commerce platforms based in Asia.

Here is a quick overview of the presentation:

e-Commerce on Cloud
There is no denying the high reliance on IT. e-Commerce portals need to handle a rising number of Internet users, provide a secure and convenient online payment system, and support lucrative offers by e-tailors. The problem is that the utilization is unpredictable (except holiday season when it is predictably unpredictable!). If your site slows or freezes, especially during a sale, it can be compared to shutting your store on Black Friday. Customers will abandon their carts, and the social media sites will erupt with negative remarks—recall the recent headliner, Flipkart faces social media backlash over ‘crashes’, ‘misleading’ pricing.

The dilemma: Over-allocate and over-pay for unused resources just to manage sudden shopping spurts, or under-allocate resources and suffer the wrath of the new-age shopper. Cloud resources seems like a natural solution when you don’t want to be stuck in the either-or situation. But, not just any cloud solution will do. If a provider has a lock-in period or contract (even if it’s short-term)—well that's not really cloud, now is it?

Similarly the cloud solution is not justifying your investments if it is going to charge you every time you, as an internal user, try to move your virtual servers across your operating geos to get closer to customers. For example: your next online sale is targeted at holiday shoppers in Singapore or you want to carry out test runs for your Amsterdam customer base, but your core virtual server originally resides in Melbourne.

Solving e-Commerce Challenges with SoftLayer
I like using this image as it gives a great view into how SoftLayer can help e-commerce and e-tail customers manage day-to-day scenarios. From seasonal site traffic spikes to needing backup solutions for business continuity, SoftLayer has a solution for it. Plus SoftLayer brings advantages gleaned from working with e-commerce giants over the past decade.

Walking the Talk—Businesses that are Leveraging Cloud . . . Successfully!
In October 2014, Natali Ardianto, Tiket.com's CTO, gave a keynote address at Cloud Expo Asia about building one of Indonesia’s largest online travel and entertainment portals. When it first launched a few years ago, Tiket.com faced TCP, DoS, and DDoS attacks while hosting unsuccessfully on two different IaaS providers. The company needed a highly stable infrastructure delivering consistent performance and reliable support to ensure site uptime and a smooth end-user experience. Tiket.com chose SoftLayer to support its site. Running on SoftLayer bare metal servers, Tiket.com systems are now able to handle more than 300 API requests per minute and has experienced a 75 percent cost savings. Watch Natali's video where he discusses his cloud experience, or read the detailed case study.

HotelsCombined.com is an impressive collection of over 5 million real-time international hotel deals, a database of more than 800,000 properties and an affiliate base of over 20,000 companies. The company uses a combination of SoftLayer bare metal and virtual servers, load balancers, and redundant iSCSI storage. This provides the company with several thousand cores of processing power and enables it to remain lean and move quickly. The company also uses the SoftLayer infrastructure to provide real-time predictive models to the website and to support its business intelligence tools. Read the detailed case study.


Photo credits @iMediaSummit

While at the conference, I met up with a great bunch of entrepreneurs, startups and giants from across Asia. It was amazing to hear about the journey and growth plans of Rakuten, Life Project, Qoo10, Telunjuk, Seroyamart.com, and many more. Keep your ears open this coming year. The e-commerce landscape is rapidly progressing and these guys are weaving the fabric.

Cheers,

–Namrata (Connect with me on LinkedIn or, Twitter)

July 9, 2013

When to Consider Riak for Your Big Data Architecture

In my Breaking Down 'Big Data' – Database Models, I briefly covered the most common database models, their strengths, and how they handle the CAP theorem — how a distributed storage system balances demands of consistency and availability while maintaining partition tolerance. Here's what I said about Dynamo-inspired databases:

What They Do: Distributed key/value stores inspired by Amazon's Dynamo paper. A key written to a dynamo ring is persisted in several nodes at once before a successful write is reported. Riak also provides a native MapReduce implementation.
Horizontal Scaling: Dynamo-inspired databases usually provide for the best scale and extremely strong data durability.
CAP Balance: Prefer availability over consistency
When to Use: When the system must always be available for writes and effectively cannot lose data.
Example Products: Cassandra, Riak, BigCouch

This type of key/value store architecture is very unique from the document-oriented MongoDB solutions we launched at the end of last year, so we worked with Basho to prioritize development of high-performance Riak solutions on our global platform. Since you already know about MongoDB, let's take a few minutes to meet the new kid on the block.

Riak is a distributed database architected for availability, fault tolerance, operational simplicity and scalability. Riak is masterless, so each node in a Riak cluster is the same and contains a complete, independent copy of the Riak package. This design makes the Riak environment highly fault tolerant and scalable, and it also aids in replication — if a node goes down, you can still read, write and update data.

As you approach the daunting prospect of choosing a big data architecture, there are a few simple questions you need to answer:

  1. How much data do/will I have?
  2. In what format am I storing my data?
  3. How important is my data?

Riak may be the choice for you if [1] you're working with more than three terabytes of data, [2] your data is stored in multiple data formats, and [3] your data must always be available. What does that kind of need look like in real life, though? Luckily, we've had a number of customers kick Riak's tires on SoftLayer bare metal servers, so I can share a few of the use cases we've seen that have benefited significantly from Riak's unique architecture.

Use Case 1 – Digital Media
An advertising company that serves over 10 billion ads per month must be able to quickly deliver its content to millions of end users around the world. Meeting that demand with relational databases would require a complex configuration of expensive, vertically scaled hardware, but it can be scaled out horizontally much easier with Riak. In a matter of only a few hours, the company is up and running with an ad-serving infrastructure that includes a back-end Riak cluster in Dallas with a replication cluster in Singapore along with an application tier on the front end with Web servers, load balancers and CDN.

Use Case 2 – E-commerce
An e-commerce company needs 100-percent availability. If any part of a customer's experience fails, whether it be on the website or in the shopping cart, sales are lost. Riak's fault tolerance is a big draw for this kind of use case: Even if one node or component fails, the company's data is still accessible, and the customer's user experience is uninterrupted. The shopping cart structure is critical, and Riak is built to be available ... It's a perfect match.

As an additional safeguard, the company can take advantage of simple multi-datacenter replication in their Riak Enterprise environment to geographically disperse content closer to its customers (while also serving as an important tool for disaster recovery and backup).

Use Case 3 – Gaming
With customers like Broken Bulb and Peak Games, SoftLayer is no stranger to the gaming industry, so it should come as no surprise that we've seen interesting use cases for Riak from some of our gaming customers. When a game developer incorporated Riak into a new game to store player data like user profiles, statistics and rankings, the performance of the bare metal infrastructure blew him away. As a result, the game's infrastructure was redesigned to also pull gaming content like images, videos and sounds from the Riak database cluster. Since the environment is so easy to scale horizontally, the process on the infrastructure side took no time at all, and the multimedia content in the game is getting served as quickly as the player data.

Databases are common bottlenecks for many applications, but they don't have to be. Making the transition from scaling vertically (upgrading hardware, adding RAM, etc.) to scaling horizontally (spreading the work intelligently across multiple nodes) alleviates many of the pain points for a quickly growing database environment. Have you made that transition? If not, what's holding you back? Have you considered implementing Riak?

-@marcalanjones

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