Posts Tagged 'Emergency'

October 1, 2014

Virtual Server Update

Good morning, afternoon, evening, or night, SoftLayer nation.

We want to give you an update and some more information on maintenance taking place right now with SoftLayer public and private node virtual servers.

As the world is becoming aware today, over the past week a security risk associated with Xen was identified by the Xen community and published as Xen Security Advisory 108 (XSA-108).

And as many are aware, Xen plays a role in our delivery of SoftLayer virtual servers.

Eliminating the vulnerability requires updating software on host nodes, and that requires downtime for the virtual servers running on those nodes.

Yeah, that’s not something anyone likes to hear. But customer security is of the utmost importance to us, so not doing it was not an option.

As soon as the risk was identified, our systems engineers and technology partners have been working nonstop to prepare the update.

On Sunday we notified every customer account that would be affected that we would have emergency maintenance in the middle of this week, and updated that notice each day.

And then yesterday we published that the maintenance would begin today at 3pm UTC, with a preliminary order of how the maintenance would roll out across all of our data centers.

We are updating host nodes data center by data center to complete the emergency maintenance as quickly as possible. This approach will minimize disruption for customers with failover infrastructure in multiple data centers.

The maintenance is under way and SoftLayer customers can follow it, live, on our forum at http://sftlyr.com/xs101.

-@SoftLayer

May 15, 2013

Secure Quorum: Tech Partner Spotlight

We invite each of our featured SoftLayer Tech Marketplace Partners to contribute a guest post to the SoftLayer Blog, and this week, we’re happy to welcome Gerard Ibarra from Secure Quorum. Secure Quorum is an easy-to-use emergency notification system and crisis management system that resides in the cloud.

Are You Prepared for an Emergency?

Every company's management team faces the challenge of having too many things going on with not enough time in the day. It's difficult to get everything done, so when push comes to shove, particular projects and issues need to be prioritized to be completed. What do we have to do today that can't be put off to tomorrow? Often, a businesses fall into a reactionary rut where they are constantly "putting out the fires" first, and while it's vital for a business to put out those fires (literal or metaphorical), that approach makes it difficult to proactively prepare for those kinds of issues to streamline the process of resolving them. Secure Quorum was created to provide a simple, secure medium to deal with emergencies and incidents.

What we noticed was that businesses didn't often consider planning for emergencies as part of their operations. The emergencies I'm talking about thankfully don't happen often, but fires, accidents, power outages, workplace violence and denial of service attacks can severely impact the bottom line if they aren't addressed quickly ... They can make or break you. Are you prepared?

Every second that we fail to make informed and logical decisions during an emergency is time lost in taking action. Take these facts for a little perspective:

  • "Property destruction and business disruption due to disasters now rival warfare in terms of loss." (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)
  • More than 10,000 severe thunderstorms, 2,500 floods, 1,000 tornadoes and 10 hurricanes affect the United States each year. On average, 500 people die yearly because of severe weather and floods. (National Weather News 2005)
  • The cost of natural disasters is rising. During the past two decades, natural disaster damage costs have exceeded the $500 billion mark. Only 17 percent of that figure was covered by insurance. (Dennis S. Mileti, Disasters by Design)
  • Losses as a result of global disasters continue to increase on average every year, with an estimated $360 billion USD lost in 2011. (Centre for Research in the Epidemiology of Disasters)
  • Natural disasters, power outages, IT failures and human error are common causes of disruptions to internal and external communications. They "can cause downtime and have a significant negative impact on employee productivity, customer retention, and the confidence of vendors, partners, and customers." (Debra Chin, Palmer Research, May 2011)

These kinds of "emergencies" are not going away, but because specific emergencies are difficult (if not impossible) to predict, it's not obvious how to deal with them. How do we reduce risk for our employees, vendors, customers and our business? The two best answers to that question are to have a business continuity plan (BCP) and to have a way to communicate and collaborate in the midst of an emergency.

Start with a BCP. A BCP is a strategic plan to help identify and mitigate risk. Investopedia gives a great explanation:

The creation of a strategy through the recognition of threats and risks facing a company, with an eye to ensure that personnel and assets are protected and able to function in the event of a disaster. Business continuity planning (BCP) involves defining potential risks, determining how those risks will affect operations, implementing safeguards and procedures designed to mitigate those risks, testing those procedures to ensure that they work, and periodically reviewing the process to make sure that it is up to date.

Make sure you understand the basics of a BCP, and look for cues from organizations like FEMA for examples of how to approach emergency situations: http://www.ready.gov/business-continuity-planning-suite.

Once you have a basic BCP in place, it's important to be able to execute it when necessary ... That's where an emergency communication and collaboration solution comes into play. You need to streamline how you communicate when an emergency occurs, and if you're relying on a manual process like a phone tree to spread the word and contact key stakeholders in the midst of an incident, you're wasting time that could better be spent focusing to the issue at hand. An emergency communication solution automates that process quickly and logically.

When you create a BCP, you consider which people in your organization are key to responding to specific types of emergencies, and if anything ever happens, you want to get all of those people together. An emergency communication system will collect the relevant information, send it to the relevant people in your organization and seamlessly bridge them into a secured conference call. What would take minutes to complete now takes seconds, and when it comes to responding to these kinds of issues, seconds count. With everyone on a secure call, decisions can be made quickly and recorded to inform employees and stakeholders of what occurred and what the next steps are.

Plan for emergencies and hope that you never have to use that plan. Think about preparing for emergencies strategically, and it could make all the difference in the world. Secure Quorum is a platform that makes it easy to communicate and collaborate quickly, reliably and securely in those high-stress situations, so if you're interested getting help when it comes to responding to emergencies and incidents, visit our site at SecureQuorum.com and check out the whitepaper we just published with one of our customers: Ease of Use: Make it Part of Your Software Decision.

-Gerard Ibarra, CEO of Secure Quorum

This guest blog series highlights companies in SoftLayer's Technology Partners Marketplace.
These Partners have built their businesses on the SoftLayer Platform, and we're excited for them to tell their stories. New Partners will be added to the Marketplace each month, so stay tuned for many more come.
September 6, 2011

Emergency Response Services

When people ask me what I do for a living these days, I tell them I provide emergency response services. With this answer, I usually get very surprised and intrigued looks as they probe for more details about the excitement of saving lives. For those that have known me for a while, they are especially shocked since my career until recently has always entailed sitting in a cubicle, crunching numbers and manipulating spreadsheets.

I don't actually provide ERS, and I don't "technically" save lives during my work days, but I do provide emergency services for our customers, and if you ask them, they'll probably tell you I'm a little like a life saver. I tell people I'm an emergency responder as a bit of a joke, but it's actually a great way to start explaining what I do at SoftLayer. When a customer's service is disrupted (preventing them from conducting important business), we need to respond immediately and knowledgeably to get everything back online as quickly as possible.

As Server Build Technicians, we have to be alert and ready for situations where a server goes down and affects the availability of a customer's site. Being offline can often translate to the loss of revenue and this I completely understand: If I wanted to buy something on a site and I find that the site is offline, I'll probably fire up a search page and look for another vendor. The first store loses my sale because I'm so conditioned to everything being available right when I need it ... And I'm not alone in this mentality.

When I started writing this article, we were gearing up for natural disaster to hit the Washington, D.C. area over the weekend (for the first time in my career). We had to plan what needed to be done at home and work ... Because SoftLayer provides web hosting services that must be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, so we have to do our best to minimize any service impact. We were lucky to have avoided much of the damage from Hurricane Irene, but we still treated it as though it was heading right toward us. In addition to the employees on site, everyone was on call to be ready to come in and help if needed. For those who have never experienced a hurricane, just think of a severe thunderstorm that lasts 8 to 12 hours, resulting in widespread power outages, flooding and wind damage.

A hurricane is scary for everyone in its path, and to a certain extent, all you can do is be safe and have a plan of response. Our data center has extremely reliable power generators and staff to handle these kinds of situations; we're always prepared for the worst case scenarios for your servers so you don't have to be.

-Danny

P.S. If you've never thought about becoming a "Server Emergency Responder," I'd recommend swinging by the SoftLayer Careers page to learn more about becoming a Server Build Technician. As of right now, there are SBT positions available in Dallas, Seattle, Amsterdam, Singapore and Washington, D.C.

January 20, 2010

Hosting for Haiti

SoftLayer is joining the online project Hosting for Haiti in an effort to raise awareness and funding for the American Red Cross. The earthquakes in Haiti on January 12 and the resulting aftershocks have left the country devastated.

The American Red Cross is dedicated to providing emergency relief and recovery to help those affected by the disaster.

This project is a joint effort between hosting providers like ourselves. Peer1 Hosting, GoGrid, The Planet, ServInt, and Rackspace are all involved in helping with donations and spreading awareness. If you would like to get involved, follow the info link at http://hostingforhaiti.com/.

Follow on Twitter: @hostingforhaiti or use the hashtag #hostingforhaiti.

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