Posts Tagged 'Employees'

April 15, 2013

The Heart of SoftLayer: People

When I started working for SoftLayer as a software engineer intern, I was skeptical about the company's culture. I read many of the culture posts on the blog, and while they seemed genuine, I was still a little worried about what the work atmosphere would be for a lowly summer intern. Fast-forward almost a year, and I look back on my early concerns and laugh ... I learned quickly that the real heart of SoftLayer is its employees, and the day-to-day operations I observed in the office consistently reinforced that principle.

It's easy to think about SoftLayer as a pure technology company. We provide infrastructure as a service capabilities for businesses with on-demand provisioning and short-term contracts. Our data centers, portal, network and APIs get the spotlight, but those differentiators wouldn't exist without the teams of employees that keep improving them on a daily basis. By focusing on the company culture and making sure employees are being challenged (but not overwhelmed), SoftLayer was indirectly improving the infrastructure we provide to customers.

When I walked into the office for my first day of work, I imagined that I'd be working in a cramped, dimly lit room in the back of the building where I'd be using hand-me-down hardware. When I was led to a good-sized, well-lit room and given a Core i3 laptop with two large monitors and a full suite of software, I started realizing how silly my worries were. I had access to the fully stocked break room, and within about a week, I felt like part of a community rather than a stale workplace.

My coworkers not only made me feel welcome but would frequently go out of their way to make sure I am comfortable and have the resources I needed to succeed. While the sheer amount of new information and existing code was daunting, managers assigned projects that were possible to complete and educational. I was doing useful work building and improving a complex production system rather than the busy work offered by many other employers' internship programs. I learned several new techniques and solidified my understanding of software engineering theory through practice. The open-door policy and friendly people around me not only created a strong sense of community but also allowed more efficient problem solving.

You may have noticed early in this post that I joined the company on a summer internship and that I also told you it's been about a year since I started. While summers in Texas feel long, they don't actually last a full year ... After my internship, I was offered a part-time position as a software engineer, and I'm going to be full-time when I graduate in May.

It's next to impossible to find a company that realizes the importance of its employees and wants to provide an environment for employees to succeed. The undeniable runaway success of the company is proof that SoftLayer's approach to taking care of employees is working.

-John

November 21, 2012

Risk Management: The Importance of Redundant Backups

You (should) know the importance of having regular backups of your important data, but to what extent does data need to be backed up to be safe? With a crowbar and shove, thieves broke into my apartment and stole the backups I've used for hundreds of gigabytes of home videos, photo files and archives of past computers. A Dobro RAID enclosure and an external drive used by Apple Time Machine were both stolen, and if I didn't have the originals on my laptop or a redundant offsite backup, I would have lost all of my data. My experience is not uncommon, and it's a perfect example of an often understated principle that everyone should understand: You need redundant backups.

It's pretty simple: You need to back up your data regularly. When you've set up that back up schedule, you should figure out a way to back up your data again. After you've got a couple current backups of your files, you should consider backing up your backups off-site. It seems silly to think of backing up backups, but if anything happens — failed drives, theft, fire, flood, etc. — those backups could be lost forever, and if you've ever lost a significant amount of data due to a hard drive failure or experience like mine, you know that backups are worth their weight in gold.

Admittedly, there is a point of diminishing return when it comes to how much redundancy is needed — it's not worth the time/effort/cost to back up your backups ad infinitum — so here are the best practices I've come up with over the course of my career in the information technology industry:

  • Plan and schedule regular backups to keep your archives current. If your laptop's hard drive dies, having backups from last June probably won't help you as much as backups from last night.
  • Make sure your data exists on three different mediums. It might seem unnecessary, but if you're already being intentional about backing up your information, take it one step further to replicate those backups at least one more time.
  • Something might happen to your easy onsite backups, so it's important to consider off-site backups as well. There are plenty of companies offering secure online backups for home users, and those are generally easy to use (even if they can be a little slow).
  • Check your backups regularly. Having a backup is useless if it's not configured to back up the correct data and running on the correct schedule.
  • RAID is not a backup solution. Yes, RAID can duplicate data across hard drives, but that doesn't mean the data is "backed up" ... If the RAID array fails, all of the hard drives (and all of the data) in the array fail with it.

It's important to note here that "off-site" is a pretty relative term when it comes to backups. Many SoftLayer customers back up a primary drive on their server to a secondary drive on the same server (duplicating the data away from the original drive), and while that's better than nothing, it's also a little risky because it's possible that the server could fail and corrupt both drives. Every backup product SoftLayer offers for customers is off-site relative to the server itself (though it might be in the same facility), so we also make it easy to have your backup in another city or on a different continent.

As I've mentioned already, once you set up your backups, you're not done. You need to check your backups regularly for failures and test them to confirm that you can recover your data quickly in the event of a disaster. Don't just view a file listing. Try extracting files or restore the whole backup archive. If you're able to run a full restore without the pressure of an actual emergency, it'll prove that you're ready for the unexpected ... Like a fire drill for your backups.

Setting up a backup plan doesn't have to be scary or costly. If you don't feel like you could recover quickly after losing your data, spend a little time evaluating ways to make a recovery like that easy. It's crazy, but a big part of "risk management," "disaster recovery" and "business continuity" is simply making sure your data is securely backed up regularly and available to you when you need it.

Plan, prepare, back up.

-Lyndell

November 14, 2012

Risk Management: Securing Your Servers

How do you secure your home when you leave? If you're like most people, you make sure to lock the door you leave from, and you head off to your destination. If Phil is right about "locks keeping honest people honest," simply locking your front door may not be enough. When my family moved into a new house recently, we evaluated its physical security and tried to determine possible avenues of attack (garage, doors, windows, etc.), tools that could be used (a stolen key, a brick, a crowbar, etc.) and ways to mitigate the risk of each kind of attack ... We were effectively creating a risk management plan.

Every risk has different probabilities of occurrence, potential damages, and prevention costs, and the risk management process helps us balance the costs and benefits of various security methods. When it comes to securing a home, the most effective protection comes by using layers of different methods ... To prevent a home invasion, you might lock your door, train your dog to make intruders into chew toys and have an alarm system installed. Even if an attacker can get a key to the house and bring some leftover steaks to appease the dog, the motion detectors for the alarm are going to have the police on their way quickly. (Or you could violate every HOA regulation known to man by digging a moat around the house, filling with sharks with laser beams attached to their heads, and building a medieval drawbridge over the moat.)

I use the example of securing a house because it's usually a little more accessible than talking about "server security." Server security doesn't have to be overly complex or difficult to implement, but its stigma of complexity usually prevents systems administrators from incorporating even the simplest of security measures. Let's take a look at the easiest steps to begin securing your servers in the context of their home security parallels, and you'll see what I'm talking about.

Keep "Bad People" Out: Have secure password requirements.

Passwords are your keys and your locks — the controls you put into place that ensure that only the people who should have access get it. There's no "catch all" method of keeping the bad people out of your systems, but employing a variety of authentication and identification measures can greatly enhance the security of your systems. A first line of defense for server security would be to set password complexity and minimum/maximum password age requirements.

If you want to add an additional layer of security at the authentication level, you can incorporate "Strong" or "Two-Factor" authentication. From there, you can learn about a dizzying array of authentication protocols (like TACACS+ and RADIUS) to centralize access control or you can use active directory groups to simplify the process of granting and/or restricting access to your systems. Each layer of authentication security has benefits and drawbacks, and most often, you'll want to weigh the security risk against your need for ease-of-use and availability as you plan your implementation.

Stay Current on your "Good People": When authorized users leave, make sure their access to your system leaves with them.

If your neighbor doesn't return borrowed tools to your tool shed after you gave him a key when he was finishing his renovation, you need to take his key back when you tell him he can't borrow any more. If you don't, nothing is stopping him from walking over to the shed when you're not looking and taking more (all?) of your tools. I know it seems like a silly example, but that kind of thing is a big oversight when it comes to server security.

Employees are granted access to perform their duties (the principle of least privilege), and when they no longer require access, the "keys to the castle" should be revoked. Auditing who has access to what (whether it be for your systems or for your applications) should be continual.

You might have processes in place to grant and remove access, but it's also important to audit those privileges regularly to catch any breakdowns or oversights. The last thing you want is to have a disgruntled former employee wreak all sorts of havoc on your key systems, sell proprietary information or otherwise cost you revenue, fines, recovery efforts or lost reputation.

Catch Attackers: Monitor your systems closely and set up alerts if an intrusion is detected.

There is always a chance that bad people are going to keep looking for a way to get into your house. Maybe they'll walk around the house to try and open the doors and windows you don't use very often. Maybe they'll ring the doorbell and if no lights turn on, they'll break a window and get in that way.

You can never completely eliminate all risk. Security is a continual process, and eventually some determined, over-caffeinated hacker is going to find a way in. Thinking your security is impenetrable makes you vulnerable if by some stretch of the imagination, an attacker breaches your security (see: Trojan Horse). Continuous monitoring strategies can alert administrators if someone does things they shouldn't be doing. Think of it as a motion detector in your house ... "If someone gets in, I want to know where they are." When you implement monitoring, logging and alerting, you will also be able to recover more quickly from security breaches because every file accessed will be documented.

Minimize the Damage: Lock down your system if it is breached.

A burglar smashes through your living room window, runs directly to your DVD collection, and takes your limited edition "Saved by the Bell" series box set. What can you do to prevent them from running back into the house to get the autographed posted of Alf off of your wall?

When you're monitoring your servers and you get alerted to malicious activity, you're already late to the game ... The damage has already started, and you need to minimize it. In a home security environment, that might involve an ear-piercing alarm or filling the moat around your house even higher so the sharks get a better angle to aim their laser beams. File integrity monitors and IDS software can mitigate damage in a security breach by reverting files when checksums don't match or stopping malicious behavior in its tracks.

These recommendations are only a few of the first-line layers of defense when it comes to server security. Even if you're only able to incorporate one or two of these tips into your environment, you should. When you look at server security in terms of a journey rather than a destination, you can celebrate the progress you make and look forward to the next steps down the road.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to go to a meeting where I'm proposing moats, drawbridges, and sharks with laser beams on their heads to SamF for data center security ... Wish me luck!

-Matthew

November 8, 2012

Celebrating the First Anniversary of SoftLayer Going Global

In October, SoftLayer's data center in Singapore (SNG01) celebrated its first birthday, and our data center in Amsterdam (AMS01) turned one year old this week as well. In twelve short months, SoftLayer has completely transformed into a truly global operation with data centers and staff around the world. Our customer base has always had an international flavor to it, and our physical extension into Europe and Asia was a no-brainer.

At the end of 2011, somewhere in the neighborhood of 40% of our revenue was generated by companies outside of North America. Since then, both facilities have been fully staffed, and we've ratcheted up support in local startup communities through the Catalyst program. We've also aggressively promoted SoftLayer's global IaaS (Infrastructure-as-a-Service) platform on the trade show circuit, and the unanimous response has been that our decision to go global has been a boon to both our existing and new customers.

This blog is filled with posts about SoftLayer's culture and our SLayers' perspectives on what we're doing as a company, and that kind of openness is one of the biggest reasons we've been successful. SoftLayer's plans for global domination included driving that company culture deep into the heart of Europe and Asia, and we're extremely proud of how both of our international locations show the same SLayer passion and spirit. In Amsterdam, our office is truly pan-European — staffed by employees who hail from the US, Croatia, Greece, France, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Ireland and England. In Singapore, the SoftLayer melting pot is filled with employees from the US, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and New Zealand. The SoftLayer culture has flourished in the midst of that diversity, and we're a better company for it.

All of this is not to say the last year has not been without challenges ... We've logged hundreds of thousands of air miles, spent far too many nights in hotels and juggled 13-hour and 6-hour time zone difference to make things work. Beyond these personal challenges, we've worked through professional challenges of how to make things happen outside of North America. It seems like everything is different — from dealing with local vendors to adjusting to the markedly different work cultures that put bounds around how and when we work (I wish I was Dutch and had as many vacation days...) — and while some adjustments have been more difficult than others, our team has pulled through and gotten stronger as a result.

As we celebrate our first anniversary of global operations, I reflect on a few of the funny "light bulb" moments I've experienced. From seeing switch balls get the same awed looks at trade shows on three different continents to realizing how to effectively complete simple tasks in the Asian business culture, I'm ecstatic about how far we've come ... And how far we're going to go.

To infinity and beyond?

-@quigleymar

October 10, 2012

On-Call for Dev Support AND a New Baby

I began working at SoftLayer in May of 2010 as a customer support administrator. When I signed on, I was issued a BlackBerry to help me follow tickets and answer questions from my coworkers when I was out of the office. In August of 2011, that sparingly used BlackBerry started getting a lot more use. I became a systems engineer in development support, and I was tasked to provide first-tier support for development-related escalations, and I joined the on-call rotation.

In the Dev Support group, each systems engineer works a seven-day period each month as the on-call engineer to monitor and respond to off-hours issues. I enjoy tackling challenging problems, and my Blackberry became an integral tool in keeping me connected and alerting me to new escalations. To give you an idea of what kinds of issues get escalated to development support, let me walk you through one particularly busy on-call night:

I leave the office and get home just in time to receive a call about an escalation. An automated transaction is throwing an error, and I need to check it out. I unload my things, VPN into the SoftLayer network and begin investigating. I find the fix and I get it implemented. I go about my evening, and before I get in bed, I make sure my BlackBerry is set to alert me if a call comes in the middle of the night. Escalations to development support typically slow down after around 11 p.m., but with international presences in Amsterdam and Singapore, it's always good to be ready for a call 2:30 a.m. to make sure their issues are resolved with the same speed as issues found in the middle of the day in one of our US facilities.

Little did I know, my SoftLayer experience was actually preparing me for a different kind of "on-call" rotation ... One that's 24x7x365.

In June 2012, my wife and I adopted an infant from El Paso, Texas. We'd been trying to adopt for almost two years, and through lots of patience and persistence, we were finally selected to be the parents of a brand new baby boy. When we brought him home, he woke up every 3 hours for his feeding, and my on-call work experience paid off. I didn't have a problem waking up when it was my turn to feed him, and once he was fed, I hopped back in bed to get back to sleep. After taking a little time off to spend with the new baby, I returned to my job, and that first week back was also my turn on the on-call rotation.

The first night of that week, I got a 1 a.m. call from Amsterdam to check out a cloud template transfer that was stuck, and I got that resolved quickly. About 30 minutes later, our son cried because he was hungry, so I volunteered to get up and feed him. After 45 minutes, he'd eaten and fallen asleep again, so I went back to bed. An hour later, I got a call from our San Jose to investigate a cloud reload transaction that was stalling with an error. I worked that escalation and made it back to bed. An hour and a half later, the little baby was hungry again. My wife graciously took the feeding responsibilities this time, and I tried to get back to sleep after waking up to the baby's cries. About an hour later, another data center had an issue for me to investigate. At this point, I was red-eyed and very sleepy. When my teammates got up the next morning, they generously took the on-call phone number so I could try to get some rest.

This pattern continued for the next six days. By the end of that first week, I got a call from work at about 3 a.m., and I picked up the Baby Monitor from the night stand and answered, "Dev support, this is Greg." My wife just laughed at me.

I've come to realize that being on-call for a baby is a lot more difficult than being on-call for development support. In dev support, I can usually documentation on how to resolve a given issue. I can search my email for the same error or behavior, and my coworkers are faithful to document how they resolve any unique issues they come across. If I get to a point where I need help, I can enlist the assistance of an SME/Developer that commonly works on a given piece of code. When you're on-call with a baby, all the documentation in the world won't help you get your newborn to stop crying faster, you don't get any clear "error messages" to guide you to the most effective response, and you can't pass the baby off to another person if you can't figure out what's wrong.

And when you're on-call for development support, you get some much-needed rest and relaxation after your seven days of work. When you're on-call for a new baby, you've got at least a few months of duty before you're sleeping through the night.

As I look back at those long nights early on, I laugh and appreciate important things in my life: My wife, my son, my job and my coworkers.

– Greg

August 31, 2012

The Dragon SLayers

It's been a couple weeks since we last posted blog post featuring what SLayers are doing outside the office, so I thought I'd share my experience from a couple months ago when SoftLayer competed in the 2012 Annual DFW Dragon Boat Festival. As you may remember, Cassandra posted about SoftLayer's participation in the Houston-area Dragon Boat Festival, so I'm taking it upon myself to share the Dallas experience.

Let me start off by admitting to you that I'm no expert when it comes to dragon boat racing. In fact, when I was asked to join the team, I was reluctant ... I'd never done anything like a dragon boat competition before, and I didn't want to make a fool of myself. It took a bit of convincing from my coworkers, but I ended up signing on to represent SoftLayer as one of the twenty people in our boat.

As it turns out, I wasn't the only rookie. In fact, this was the first year we've had a boat full of newbies, so we all learned the ropes (or oars) of dragon boat racing together. We had practice on Home Depot buckets in the hallway for about two weeks before we actually hit the water, and by the time our on-the-water practice came, we already had a good feel for the basics of the race. Until then, I had no idea how small the boat was and how soaked we'd get while we were paddling. What had I gotten myself into?

My son was home from college over the race weekend, so I managed to get him signed him up as a backup rower. When we got to the lake, the SLayers were all very noticeable ... Our team was sporting the "Dragon SLayer" shirts, and the SoftLayer tent was abuzz with activity. There were other big companies there like AT&T, Sprint, the Dallas SWAT team, Penny's and Samsung, but we weren't intimidated — even when the other teams started talking smack when we broke out our Home Depot buckets to get some last-minute practice.

When we set sail — er... paddle — we were nervous. The gun sounded, and in a flurry of synchronized rowing, we found ourselves at the finish before everyone else in our heat. First race, first place. Obviously, we were excited by that outcome, so we were probably even more antsy when it came time to run the second race. We piled into the boat, made our way to the starting line, and after another flurry of activity, we won the second race! We were in the finals.

You can probably guess what happened next:

We won it all!

In the video, you can see that we started out slow but came from behind to take the victory (The video gets better at the end of the race). The eagle eyes in the audience will probably also notice that we rowed so hard that the dragon head came off of the boat.

Our practice on the Home Depot cans turned out to be pretty effective. My son Jeremy wound up playing a key role on the boat — the drummer — and he headed back to college with quite a story to tell his friends. All of the SLayers stuck around to accept our trophy, and we made sure to snap a few pictures:

I am proud to call myself a SLayer (and a Dragon SLayer)!

-Fabrienne

Categories: 
July 19, 2012

The Human Element of SoftLayer - DAL05 DC Operations

One of the founding principles of SoftLayer is automation. Automation has enabled this company to provide our customers with a world class experience, and it enables employees to provide excellent service. It allows us to quickly deploy a variety of solutions at the click of a button, and it guarantees consistency in the products that we deliver. Automation isn't the whole story, though. The human element plays a huge role in SoftLayer's success.

As a Site Manager for the corporate facility, I thought I could share a unique perspective when it comes to what that human element looks like, specifically through the lens of the Server Build Team's responsibilities. You recently heard how my colleague, Broc Chalker, became an SBT, and so I wanted take it a step further by providing a high-level breakdown of how the Server Build Team enables SoftLayer to keep up with the operational demands of a rapidly growing, global infrastructure provider.

The Server Build Team is responsible for filling all of the beautiful data center environments you see in pictures and videos of SoftLayer facilities. Every day, they are in the DC, building out new rows for inventory. It sounds pretty simple, but it's actually a pretty involved process. When it comes to prepping new rows, our primary focus is redundancy (for power, cooling and network). Each rack is powered by dual power sources, four switches in a stacked configuration (two public network, two private network), and an additional switch that provides KVM access to the server. To make it possible to fill the rack with servers, we also have to make sure it's organized well, and that takes a lot of time. Just watch the video of the Go Live Crew cabling a server rack in SJC01, and you can see how time- and labor-intensive the process is. And if there are any mistakes or if the cables don't look clean, we'll cut all the ties and start over again.



 

In addition to preparing servers for new orders, SBTs also handle hardware-related requests. This can involve anything from changing out components for a build, performing upgrades / maintenance on active servers, or even troubleshooting servers. Any one of these requests has to be treated with significant urgency and detail.



 

The responsibilities do not end there. Server Build Technicians also perform a walk of the facility twice per shift. During this walk, technicians check for visual alerts on the servers and do a general facility check of all SoftLayer pods. Note: Each data center facility features one or more pods or "server rooms," each built to the same specifications to support up to 5,000 servers.



 

The DAL05 facility has a total of four pods, and at the end of the build-out, we should be running 18,000-20,000 servers in this facility alone. Over the past year, we completed the build out of SR02 and SR03 (pod 2 and 3, respectively), and we're finishing the final pod (SR04) right now. We've spent countless hours building servers and monitoring operating system provisions when new orders roll in, and as our server count increases, our team has grown to continue providing the support our existing customers expect and deserve when it comes to upgrade requests and hardware-related support tickets.



 

To be successful, we have to stay ahead of the game from an operations perspective. The DAL05 crew is working hard to build out this facility's last pod (SR04), but for the sake of this blog post, I pulled everyone together for a quick photo op to introduce you to the team.

DAL05 Day / Evening Team and SBT Interns (with the remaining racks to build out in DAL05):
DAL05 DC Ops

DAL05 Overnight Server Build Technician Team:
DAL05 DC Ops

Let us know if there's ever anything we can do to help you!

-Joshua

July 6, 2012

My Advice to Myself (A New Server Build Technician)

When I started at SoftLayer, I had no idea what to expect. As I walked from the parking lot to the front doors at SJC01, I started to get nervous ... I felt was like I was stepping onto a stage, and I was worried about making a mistake. I took a deep breath and walked in.

Now that I look back on my first day (which was about a month ago), I have to laugh at my nervousness. I'm not sure what I expected to encounter, but the environment I entered was probably the most welcoming and friendly I've ever seen. Two of my coworkers, Cuong and Jonathan, recently shared their experiences as SBTs in San Jose, but because I have some recent first-hand experience that's still fresh in my mind, I thought I'd share my own perspective.

If I were able to talk to myself as I nervously approached the San Jose data center on my first day, this is what I'd say:

As you'd expect from any new job, your first day at work involves a lot of learning (and paperwork). You're probably chomping at the bit to get out into the data center to start building servers, but you need to crawl before you walk. The first thing you need to do is get the lay of the land ... You get a guided tour of the office, the data center and your workspace. Even if you've worked in a data center before, you're going to be surprised and impressed with how everything is set up. Once all of your paperwork is in order, you start learning about SoftLayer's business and how you contribute to the customer experience. Once you understand the big picture, you can get into the details.

You're given a training guide that goes over many of the processes and procedures that are followed on a day-to-day basis in the data center, and you're shown all of the components you'll be working with as you build, upgrade and manage server hardware. You might not be performing much work on hardware in production in your first few days, but you're going to learn a lot and have plenty of time to ask questions. While you're learning how to perform your work tasks, you're building friendships with your coworkers, and you're officially becoming part of the SoftLayer family. Your fellow SLayers support you and help you make sure SoftLayer's customers are getting the service they expect.

You're taught everything you need to know, from staying organized and focused to best practices around working with servers. You have nothing to be nervous about.

I've only been with SoftLayer for a short period of time, but I can confidently say that working here is remarkable. I don't feel like an "employee;" I feel like a team player. I feel like everyone is on the same page about what needs to be done in the data center, and whenever questions come up, answers are given quickly.

I'm excited to come to work every day. I would have never dreamed I'd feel this way because I was always told jobs are long and drag-out boring, but my experience has been the polar opposite. Now, When any of my friends complain about getting up and going to work, I recommend they visit http://www.softlayer.com/about/careers.

-Jackie

June 29, 2012

We're Shipping Up to Boston - HostingCon 2012

It's that time of year again ... HostingCon is upon us, and we're faced with an interesting challenge: Go even bigger and badder in Boston than we did at HostingCon 2011 in San Diego. And that's a tall order.

Given the fact that we've already sponsored and participated in dozens of conferences around the world this year, you might be surprised to learn that we've still got a surprises in our bag of tricks. Without giving too much away, I thought I'd share a few of the SoftLayer-specific highlights you make note of if you're planning your HostingCon itinerary.

Conference Sessions

Want some hosting insight from the executive management team of one of the largest privately held hosting providers in the world? You might want to add these sessions to your calendar:

Partnerships Done Right
Lance Crosby, CEO
9:00am – Monday, July 16
Management Track

As more "non-traditional" hosters (telcos, cable companies & VARs) enter the cloud services market finding the right partner is a must. The opportunity is huge but this isn’t a situation where a rising tide will float all boats. Lance Crosby, CEO of SoftLayer will explain how, in order to be successful, you’ll need to understand the following: 1) Building for Internet Scale, 2) Think platform first, and 3) How to automate. The session will include discussion of how SoftLayer leverages partners to drive business growth.

Build vs Buy: Operations & Billing Automation
Nathan Day, Chief Scientist (+ Panel)
9:00am – Tuesday, July 17
Technology Track

The finance, operations and administrative back office of a hosting company can be a complex animal. Some hosts have dedicated software development teams to build in-house solutions, others opt to buy as much as they can from 3rd party vendors. Hear three different approaches to tackling the problem, and learn how your product line can determine the optimal mix of open source, home grown and off-the-shelf solutions.

Finding Your Story: Branding and Positioning in the Hosting Industry
Simon West, CMO
2:00pm – Tuesday, July 17
Sales & Marketing Track

In a crowded marketplace it's critical to establish a clear position and identity in the minds of your customers and prospects. SoftLayer CMO Simon West will discuss best practices for defining and articulating your brand position, illustrating with specific examples drawn from his experience in building some of the industry's most notable brands.

Build, Launch, Sell: Strategies for Launching a Product in the Hosting Business
George Karidis, CSO (+ Panel)
3:00pm – Tuesday, July 17
Management Track

Introducing value-added services around basic hosting can be the strategy that turns a hosting business into a winning venture for the host, and a truly valuable service for the customer. In this interactive session, a panel of product management experts from the hosting business will cover best practices for building (or integrating), launching and selling a new product to your customers, helping you to develop processes, procedures and strategies for seeing a new product launch through from start to finish.

The SoftLayer Booth: #413

When you step into the expo hall at the John B. Hynes Convention Center, you're going to see SoftLayer. In our 20' x 30' space at booth 413, we'll have a few of your favorite SLayers available to answer any and all of your questions about what's new and what's next for SoftLayer ... And to pass out some always-popular SoftLayer swag.

SoftLayer Booth

By popular demand, the Server Challenge will be making its return to HostingCon, and if last year is any indication, the competition will be fierce. The pride of besting all HostingCon attendees in reassembling a server rack is arguably as valuable as the New iPad the winner receives. Though your pride doesn't have a Retina Display.

Host Me All Night Long

Following the phenomenal success of "Geeks Gone Wild" last year (headlined by The Dan Band), we knew we had our work cut out for us when it came to planning a party for HostingCon in Boston. We've teamed up with cPanel and comcure to put together "Host Me All Night Long" at Royale Boston on Monday, July 16.

Host Me All Night Long

One of my favorite comedians, Ralphie May, is going hit the stage at 8pm, and you won't want to miss a second of his set. Following Ralphie, Yellow Brick Road is bringing their award-winning Classic Rock tribute skills from Las Vegas to keep the night going. Given the name of the party, you shouldn't be surprised when a little AC/DC "You Shook Me All Night Long" is played.

Like last year, the attendance is strictly limited, and when the number of tickets available at http://hostingconparty.com/ reaches zero, you're out of luck. Even if you're our best customer ever, you need a ticket to get in the door, so register while you can! If you show a little extra SoftLayer love on Twitter or Facebook, send me a link to it (khazard@softlayer.com), and I might be able to hook you up with a VIP code to get you priority access and into the VIP section at the venue.

Like the Dropkick Murphys, we're "shipping up to Boston," and we hope to see you there!

-@khazard

June 22, 2012

Building the SoftLayer Team - Inside and Outside the Office

Almost a year ago, I walked into SoftLayer for the first time as an employee, but it wasn't my first encounter with the business. I knew quite a bit about SoftLayer (and what it would be like to work for SoftLayer) because a family member and more than a handful of friends were already SLayers. By the time applied to join the company as an "API Evangelist," I had high expectations ... Or so I thought. As it turns out, I had no idea how outstanding working for SoftLayer would be.

When people talk about company culture, you usually hear buzzwords like "collaborative environment," "team-oriented," "transparency" and "progressive thinking." To a certain extent, they all sound a little forced and cliche, and it almost kills me that they're exactly the words I'd use to honestly describe my SoftLayer experience. Why? Because every day, I see people collaborating on news ways to innovate, execute code more efficiently and improve our systems ... And not only do I see that happening, I feel involved in those conversations as well.

In a day and age where it seems most companies do business like they are herding sheep, it's pretty phenomenal to work in an environment where employees are encouraged to speak, and when they speak, they are heard.

A surprisingly large part of SoftLayer's company culture involves getting employees out of the office. Yes ... I said out of the office! From baseball games to barbeque contests to dragon boat races, the SoftLayer team actually becomes more of a "team" when we leave the office. In my previous jobs, the last thing I'd want to do at 5:00pm on a Friday would be to spend a couple more hours with my work desk's neighbor. These days, I look forward to the chances to hang out with my coworkers outside the office. I know it sounds cheesy, but it's the truth.

Just look at the Pink Soles in Motion fundraiser to raise money and support the Susan G. Komen for the Cure. Did it make a difference that the event was on a Saturday? Absolutely not. You could see SLayers in their SoftLayer gear everywhere you looked.

I am always impressed by the sheer number of people who love what they do and love being a part of SoftLayer. If you subscribe to the "SoftLayer Culture" RSS feed, you'll see exactly what I'm talking about ... That category is filled with posts from employees who can't help but share their love for SoftLayer with the world. When you get so many passionate and enthusiastic people under one roof, you get a with contagious excitement and the shared purpose of providing the best possible products and services to our customers.

When I walk through the office and see happy people talking about their work, I know I'm in the right place.

Thanks for the one-year anniversary, SoftLayer! It's been a great year.

If you want to put the SoftLayer culture to the test, check out the available Careers at SoftLayer to find an opportunity that can bring you onto the team. You won't be disappointed.

-Sarah

Categories: 
Subscribe to employees