Posts Tagged 'Facility'

December 9, 2011

Earn Your Bars

In less than six years, SoftLayer has grown pretty drastically. We started as a small company with ten people crammed into a living room, brainstorming how to build one innovative data center in Dallas. Now we have more than six hundred employees managing thirteen data centers on three different continents. It's insane to see how far we've come when you read those two sentences, and as I think back, I remember the sacrifices employees have made to help our business get where it is today.

In the early days, we were taking out loans and tapping our bank accounts to buy servers. When customers started asking for more features and functionality in the portal, developers coded non-stop to make it happen. A lot of those sacrifices aren't very obvious from the outside, but we wouldn't be where we are today without them. One of the biggest sacrifices SLayers make is when we need to build new data centers to accommodate customer demand ... A "Go Live Crew" of employees moves away from their friends and family to those facilities to make sure the new SoftLayer data center meets our high expectations.

In the military, a soldier will "earn his/her stripes" by doing something that shows that he or she deserves a particular rank or position. The more stripes on the sleeve of your uniform, the higher your rank. As you've probably gathered from pictures and videos around the office, SoftLayer employees don't wear uniforms, but SLayers love to wear SoftLayer swag, and this "mechanic" shirt has been one of the most popular sellers in our company store:

Earn Your Bars Shirts

We wanted to recognize the employees that have given weeks (and sometimes months) of their time to join a Go Live Crew for a data center build-out, so we took that popular shirt and added a little flair. Following the "earn your stripes" idea, these employees have "earned their bars" for each data center they help build.

Earn Your Bars Shirts

Every employee who was on a Go Live Crew in Seattle, Washington, D.C., San Jose, Singapore or Amsterdam will get shirts with location-specific graphics to recognize their contribution, and their most recent shirt will have the "bars" you see in the picture above.

As a bit of added recognition, here are the shirt recipients for each data center location:

Earn Your Bars Shirts
Seattle Go Live Crew
John E., Edmund G., Robert G., Joe H., Brad L., Charles P., Joshua R., William S., Zane W.
Earn Your Bars Shirts
Washington, D.C. Go Live Crew
Troy D., John E., Reed F., Edmund G., Robert G., Brad L., Charles P., Joshua R., Zane W.
Earn Your Bars Shirts
San Jose Go Live Crew
Kalin D., John E., Chris F., Hector F., Edmund G., Robert G., Tim L., Russ M., Edward R., Brent R., Brandon S., Joshua Z.
Earn Your Bars Shirts
Singapore Go Live Crew
Chris F., Joshua F.. Ryan G., Robert G., Hao H., Tim L., Russ M., Todd M., Kyle S., Eric V.
Earn Your Bars Shirts
Amsterdam Go Live Crew
Raul A., Brian C., Elijah F., Hector F., Edmund G., Robert G., Sydney M., Stephen M., Michael P., Goran P., Mark Q., Edward R., Jason R., Brandon S., Sopheara S., Joshua Z.

And if you happened to compare the names between all five teams, you'll notice that Robert Guerra was on every crew. You know what that means?

Earn Your Bars Shirts

He has a brand new wardrobe.

CBNO.

-@lavosby

September 29, 2011

Global Expansion: Singapore Ready for Launch

Are you familiar with the "slow clap" phenomenon?

It's basically a crescendo of applause in a crowd that starts with a single hand clap. A few seconds after that first clap, you hear the second. A slow rhythm takes shape. A few people join in. The rhythm is contagious, and it starts to spread through the crowd. As more people join in, the natural tendency is for the pace to speed up as the volume increases, and within about a minute, a single hand clap becomes a huge roar of applause. In the movie Rudy, one character starts a "slow clap" on the sideline of a football game, and the cheer ends up filling the entire stadium ... And that's the visual that comes to mind when I think about the upcoming "go live" date for our Singapore data center.

Start a slow clap in your mind and think of each successive milestone getting faster and exponentially louder applause:

If you imagined correctly, the applause in your mind should be borderline deafening ... And I didn't even mention the fact that we enabled pre-orders on select servers in Singapore last week with a Triple Double special exclusively for servers in the new SNG01 facility.

AND I haven't said anything about the progress of our first European data center in Amsterdam. We already have a team of people there working to get that facility ready, and it's coming together just as quickly. Don't be surprised to see a few sneak peeks at the build-out process there in the next few weeks.

It's almost unfathomable that we're so close to the launch of our first facility outside the United States, and when you consider how quickly Amsterdam will come online after Singapore, you probably think you're taking crazy pills ... Or that we are. I don't want to take any of the wind out of the sales of our launch day, so I'm just going to share a few more glimpses into the data center.

On Monday, you can light your first server at the end of this Singaporean hallway:

SoftLayer Singapore Data Center

All of the racks are powered:

SoftLayer Singapore Data Center

The server rails are installed:

SoftLayer Singapore Data Center

And we thought it might be a good idea to go ahead and install a few servers:

SoftLayer Singapore Data Center

Now all we need to do is flip the switch ... Are you ready?

-@toddmitchell

May 31, 2011

Bringing Home Data Center Security

Look at any time period in mankind's history, and you'll come to the undeniable conclusion that technology changes the daily lives people in any society. With the evolution of technology, our lives have gotten so much easier. Consider all the little luxuries and conveniences available now to get tasks done in the workplace and home. Unfortunately, our rapid technological advancements aren't necessarily exclusive to the "good guys" ... The "bad guys" are benefiting from new technologies as well. Crime and theft have become more sophisticated, and as a result, more technological advancement has to be pursued in security, and it's pretty remarkable to see some of the security measures and technologies put in place by companies like SoftLayer.

The day I started working here, I thought I was actually joining the CIA. I had to undergo several procedures to gain access to all the facilities: I had my photo taken and my fingerprints scanned before I registered for multiple key cards. The first job I had out of college only required its employees to have a single key card that allowed entrance through one door with access to all areas. Needless to say, it was a lot different to work in such a secure environment.

To give you an idea of what kinds of security we have at our data center, I'll walk you through my daily experience. I step into our lobby and am usually greeted by multiple security guards behind what appears to be bullet-proof glass. I have to pass a fingerprint scanner and numerous secured door checkpoints to get into the office. Every move is under the scrutiny of video cameras recording every square inch of the building. Big Brother is always watching, and for SoftLayer customers, that should be reassuring.

The facility's security reminds me of the movie Minority Report, and while those security measures may seem unnecessary or excessive, they're actually just visible evidence of SoftLayer's focus on the importance of security both online and in the physical realm.

Thinking about safety, I've also started considering heightening security at my home with a few security cameras. Some of my friends joke that this consideration is a sign of impending paranoia, but the "better safe than sorry" mantra should always be kept close to heart when it comes to protecting valuables. Apparently, I'm not alone in my home security research ... A day after writing a good portion of this article, I came to work and in the morning a coworker told me he'd recently bought a security camera with night vision for personal use. I didn't expect such a coincidence, and of course I enthusiastically replied to my coworker that I was thinking about making a similar purchase.

In closing, I'd like to ask you if you've entertained the idea of increasing security in your own home, and if so, do you have any suggestions about what equipment to purchase and features that prove useful? I doubt I'll go as far as hiring security guards and installing fingerprint scanners, but you never know!

-Danny

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